Go Premium
Facebook Twitter Google Plus

Intellectual Property and Ripping Shit Off in Korea

August 1, 2013

Comments

Share Post

Ok, so this is a bit of a random topic, but it’s something we feel is worth talking about. It doesn’t have a lot of practical info for you if you’re coming to visit Korea. Not like you need to know what things to pack and, also, worry about your copyrights, but it’s a topic we’re somewhat passionate about, since it’s one that affects us. Korean businesses rip off a lot of other people’s shit, and that freaking sucks. We talked about a couple of stories today in which we were affected, but there are others, some of which we had to settle out of court, that we won’t be talking about here.

The legal jargon of copyrights and intellectual properties is something that’s beyond us. I’m sure there’s a lot of legality to the issue that we just don’t have the knowledge to speak about, and I’m sure some people who are lawyers in Korea will be able to say in so many words that it’s not copyright infringement if blankity blank blank fart blank. Or, who knows: maybe there are some laws about international intellectual property here in Korea that allow for Angelina Jolie bars to run. Or maybe Angelina Jolie was like “yeah! I’d love to have my pics all over a bar in Bucheon” Who knows. All we can really comment on is our experiences and how we perceive the situations around us.

At the same time, I remember reading a while ago that a tech company, namely SpaceX, won’t patent its intellectual property, simply because China would just use that as a recipe book. Great metaphor, really, and basically gives us the impression that we have here. Ideas from other countries can be ripped off, and there isn’t really much that can be done to stop it.

Side note: I know some of you know what company we were referring to that took a lot of our footage after we refused to be on the show. Buuut, notice how we didn’t name them? Why, you might ask? Defamation laws! Korea’s got some bizarre laws in which you can’t publicly say bad things about people, even if those things are freaking goddamned 100% true. We have close friends of ours who recently got fired from their schools wrongfully, and assaulted by the school’s owner as well, but they can’t go public with that on the internet because they’d get sued for defamation. I’m sure that there’s more subtlety and variation to the law, but we’re not familiar enough with it. All we know is that it’s damning enough to be afraid of speaking out publicly. And, seeing how this is a big company that we’re talking about, and we’re just petty foreigners with little protection here, we’re going to be as vague as possible. Yep.

Anyhow, you heard us also mention in the video the idea not only that we didn’t want to be in that major network’s video, but also the reason WHY we didn’t want to be there, which we just touched on a bit. Basically, we get contacted from time to time from TV shows who want us to play the role of the fun foreign couple who comes to Korea and is amazed by everything. “Oh! The food is so spicy but so delicious! We did not know your country makes such great food! Wow! And it is good for your health too! This country amazes me so much!” What’s bizarre about these shows is that they’re on Korean channels, spoken by Korean hosts, subtitled in Korean (or, they even want us to say these things in Korean), and aired for a Korean audience. What purpose do these shows serve, apart from feeding the audience’s sense of nationalism and pride? It’s not educational. It’s not meant for other countries to watch. It’s ego-stroking, really. We agreed to do those shows before we really knew what they were like and the message they conveyed, but now we’re not interested in doing them. Does that mean that we refuse all shows? No. There’s another major network we’ve been speaking with who have suggested a cool concept for a show, which we’re totally down for, and which doesn’t reek of nationalism.

And, sure, I know some people will say that the nature of those shows we’re against is essentially what we do with our videos as well: we’re showing the world the awesomeness of Korea. But there’s a difference, I think. We can talk about things that are annoying. We can say what we think is wrong. Sure, whenever we do say something negative it’ll come at the cost of getting nationalist netizens demanding our deportation, but we’re at least trying to come at Korea with a grain of salt. We’re more interested in sharing our stories, rather than spreading a message of Korea’s supremity. We’ll do the same no matter what country we’re in.

Ok, this got a bit heated. Sorry for ranting. This TV show thing annoyed us, and what better place to talk about it than here? You guise are cool people with whom we can discuss these things rationally. You commenting Nasties are legit :D We’re more than ok with talking about any of the points here, about copyrights and intellectual property and trying to get a better understanding of Korea’s stance on it, or even about our positions on different kinds of Korean TV shows with foreigners. Let us know what you think.

Oh, and lastly, if you like this video and want more like em, click on this button below to let us know. It’s definitely worth the energy it takes to click the button :D

Comments

394

Share Post

TL;DR

HIDE COMMENTS

Intellectual Property and Ripping Shit Off in Korea

394 COMMENTS

Leave a Reply

  1. Copyright just doesn’t seem to be an idea there. I know people when I was studying there (Konkuk University if you’re wondering) that would literally copy and paste from Wikipedia and call it their essay and get A’s. Usually those students (no, exclusively as far as I knew) were Chinese and Korean. I knew people (once again, from East Asia) who would find presentations online, memorize them, them give them as their own never once giving credit to who made the PowerPoint. And this is normal.

    I think this is why Korean scholasticism seem so different than that of the West. Over here we put more of a focus on application and understanding, making our students write essays and having them answer more open-ended questions on concepts rather than specifics. While in Korea (and I’m assuming China too since those students acted this way) they focus more on facts: who did this, when did this happen, what equation does this, etc. I’ve heard stories of people who did not even speak English and would take courses taught in English and then memorize the text book, look for similar words, and regurgitate the knowledge from that area of the book.

    3 years ago
    • I read an article awhile back (I think in the New York Times) about the increase of students from Asia at American universities. The article talked about a lot of things, the culture shock, language barrier, homesickness, etc. But one of the things they mentioned was that some universities have made sure to include a class on plagiarism during orientation because they kept having students from Asia shocked to find themselves on academic probation for plagiarism after turning in a paper copied and pasted from wikipedia. They realized that a lot of the students simply didn’t realize that you can’t do that.
      Businesses are a whole other matter though. They know full well they’re not supposed to do that, but don’t give a shit.

      3 years ago
  2. I just wondering that the K… W…. had contact you, and then you guys denied them. After that, TV Show just download your video on Youtube !!! The Copyright Law is exist, but it doesn’t work properly in tons of country. !!!

    3 years ago
  3. I think the big difference in the Ripping off issues is between Korea and China, China is SUPER well known for it but Korea isn’t as well known internationally so they’re able to escape being noticed

    3 years ago
    • that’s because korea doesn’t do it on the scale china does, there’s a reason they’re known for it

      3 years ago
    • Also, China is a lot better at getting around loopholes. I mean, some fakes are outright fakes, without any attempt to go around legal loopholes. If you look at a lot of the products that use designer logos, you’ll find that the logos have been altered in some way. It’s like when people on youtube making English Sub videos for songs have to change the pitch of the song or something (although I think that’s more to escape the semi-automated system YT uses). China does that a lot.

      And also, although declining, China has been considered a rising super power in the past few years so I guess it makes the companies feel bold…and speaking as a Chinese person (despite being born and raised in Canada), I know that a part of Chinese culture is…I guess you can call it a bull-headed attitude…doing things even though you know you shouldn’t, forcefully. It’s what my dad knew growing up, and what I experienced the couple of times I’ve visited China.

      And I guess some people might see it as–well, those are big companies who make lots of money. They won’t care about a handful of indie shops, etc stealing logos and designs (or can’t be bothered with them) because it won’t make a huge dent in their profits. And I guess that’s true. Anyone who would rather buy a fake designer product (say, purse) probably wasn’t planning on buying the original, anyway–so it’s not profit lost.

      Morally speaking, one should always give credit where credit is due. Too bad people aren’t always moral…

      3 years ago
  4. OK, here is my view on the topic of “copyright” in Korea…

    A short while ago I discussed copyright issues with one of the companies in my country, in retrospect to the development that is happening in China. The thing is, as it goes: Chinese people copy A LOT. They have seriously gone to international events with “stolen” models, but the jurisdiction has always been well done, because legally they have managed to stay away from most sueings…

    When I start to think of copyright generally in Asia, you have to remember Asia as a whole was during one point behind in the industrial development, and I am not talking about the 19-th century enlightment they had when they realised “oh, Europeans and Americans are WAY ahead of us”.

    I mean literally, how many things haven’t been labelled as made in Japan, made in Korea or made in China as of these last 30 years.? Still, the development within theses countries (apart from China), started to escalate in the 80s, by… copying. (Chinese development escalated a decade later for various reasons).

    This I guess can explain why “copyright” has until now not been the greatest topic, because neither of these countries created very original aspects until later in history. Now, when the K.pop industry has become one of these beacons for creative flow, I guess it is only natural for them to want to keep this as their own, and not share in the same way. After all, it is an industry.

    Same time, I supose that essence of copying and earning money by using something that works, like advertisement through famous people or logos, is still there. My guess is, the more we get closer to Asia in general (which is happening faster than ever thanks to e.g. the Internet), the more they have to realise they cannot do this in the same way.

    3 years ago
    • Except Japan woke up in the 1980s and realized that just copying was not getting them anywhere and that they would become very dependent on this path. They then started actually licensing patents and improving designs and bringing in the knowledge on a legitimate basis. That’s when “made in Japan” went from crap to actually worth something, then to actually being sought after. Somehow, I don’t get the impression that China or Korea have woken up yet….. Was it something to do with Samurai culture of honour? Who knows.

      3 years ago
      • Has to do with American intervention honestly. After WWII, Japan was in shambles and they accepted USA’s help to get back on its feet. Then they were smart and started coping with things themselves and got the upper hand later on. The same happened with China and South Korea but they took longer because they had always being on the SU’s side ideology-wise. It wasn’t until their ideologies fell short that they started opening up their meagre economies. It’s always foreign investment that brings money to the countries. If they know how to use it, they develop.

        I’m in way trying to say this in a biased, subjective way, but for anyone with a little bit of world history knowledge, they should know USA was at the top after WWII. Most of the war had happened in Asia and Europe, and the USA was practically intact, with a monster growing economy. It offered help to the destroyed countries and asked only for the interests, reinforcing their place at the top with marketing strategy in music and movies and ideology play against the SU in the Cold War.

        3 years ago
        • Hah. Yeah, there is that. If the US hadn’t done that though after WWII, there wouldn’t have been anyone for them to trade and their economy would have tanked as well. But, leaving Japan to the side, I would argue that this democratic-style “capitalistic altruism” had somewhat different motives than foreign investment these days. It’s impossible to call it “corporate investment” when countries like China own 51%+ of every company in the country, it’s more like a quiet invasion. But why take on the responsibility of taking care of the extra people and the land, just loot and leave it to burn like a pirate. Look at the way that China “invested” in Africa – it’s a completely different result and I think it’s naive to blame it on countries “not knowing what to do with the investment”. Canada is currently being heavily invested in by China and things are not pretty – I don’t know how long the veneer of smoke and mirrors can last. Europe is starting to slam doors to foreign investment and I can totally see why. When a country treats another country the way Microsoft used to treat its competitors…….

          Cyber_3 – How did this turn so political? History is not my forte – help me internets!

          3 years ago
      • Well Hyundai is doing better than Honda and Toyota in many ways and Samsung has surpassed Sony and many other Japanese companies. Copying is how we all learn (thing about how you learn to write, dance, cook or play a musical instrument). China has already topped US and Japan as the top patent file so I will expect many innovative and sought after products coming out of China in the future.

        3 years ago
        • I can’t argue with the “copying is how we learn” but innovation is how we thrive. If all the money goes to the copiers, soon there will be nothing left TO copy because all of the creators will have gone bankrupt. This is a limited time model. Also, you can only throw a disposable labour force at your foundation for so long before the whole thing starts to crumble. Will China pull a rabbit out of its hat? I’m skeptical.

          Also, China is top in patent filing because a)if you want to do business in China you need to work with a 51% government-owned company and that company will file the patents of your tech for you in China (which is recent – before foreign companies didn’t bother), b) China is trying to cover its butt as all the sh*t that they have been copying for years is finally starting to hurt their business and they have to make themselves look more legit, and c) if someone in China steals your patent (from another country) and patents it in China, you can’t legitimately produce your own tech in China without licensing it first from this patent holder – easy $$$. I would highly doubt that more than 1% of those patents are for anything “new”. It’s a clever system, really.

          3 years ago
      • Actually I was just thinking about this and said to myself that copyright and intellectual property laws in Korea and China will become tougher in the exact same way that they became tougher elsewhere. Some company will eventually create something super innovative, and then another company will steal it, and they’ll suddenly see the value in strictly enforced copyright law and start lobbying for it.

        3 years ago
        • I hope that you are right.

          I cannot speak for Korea because I have never been there but of the large office full of electrical engineering graduates that I met in China, none of them, N-O-N-E! even knew basic high school electrical theory. When money or position is required to get a degree and that is all you require, you won’t see much innovation. It’s all smoke and mirrors, the only innovators from China I have seen have been the ones that were educated abroad.

          3 years ago
    • Ooo. Love your post. Very insightful. Didn’t think about it that way. China wasn’t far from my thoughts either because the way I saw the copyright issue, was that perhaps–to an extent–it was under the same mentality as China (except you know, China being exceptionally bad at it).

      3 years ago
  5. great video and blog…and im not surprised by how you feel about your videos being used. i checked my subscriptions on youtube and there was a video with you guys faces as the screen shot but when i clicked it was a k** world video about the hallyu wave. it wasn’t offence or anything but as you guys mentioned it’s just an ego boost, and the fact that the channel is government run just makes it a lil shady in my opinion. its a little like a form of propaganda

    i really didn’t think about english songs being used in variety/dramas….you mentioned about the huge fees to use the songs but i was wondering if the shows are using the copyrights for the songs that apply in south korea or asia, so then they are not paying the dollar amount but the amount that applies to their country/region. for example if a song’s copyright is owned by warner music group , instead of contacting the american side of it wouldn’t they just seek permission from the korean company? i only ask this because i feel that these big variety shows made by the big 3 korean networks wouldn’t make such a ricky move by not seeking permission first to use a song :S

    3 years ago
  6. I just remembered when I ever I used to go to 99 cents stores they always sold rip off Digimon and Pokemon stickers although some of them were real characters

    3 years ago
  7. i know which company you guys are talking about!! i think you mentioned it on twitter?

    i’ve actually wondered about this before cos when you go on kpop merch sites there are always these “(relevant kpop group) style” products!! like for example if a kpop idol wore a Jeremy Scott top, these sites would have a rip off version of it!! even clothing items from dramas!!
    also i always thought how can they keep making and selling things with a kpop groups logos and stuff on them!! (i admit i brought some stuff though…. ahahaha!!)

    that defamation law is crazy!! my friend told me of a teacher that got fired from the college we used to go to and how he was swearing and laughing at the college for getting bad marks after he (and many others were fired) and posted it up on his facebook and many students saw!! guess if it was in Korean he couldn’t do that!!

    3 years ago
  8. The whole logo stealing happens a lot in other countries, specifically in China. I live in the States, but I do go to China every few years. And I always find it hilarious at how badly disguised some of the logos and slogans are. There are a lot of Nike rip offs and such. Last time I went, there were a lot of Snoopy and Winnie the Pooh merchandise for glue sticks or pencil cases and whatever, and I’m pretty sure the companies that created these characters didn’t give them permission. What you said about large companies not seeking these small businesses is really true.

    Because I’m not a creator, I can’t relate to having my material distributed without my consent, but I do know how angry it makes a lot of creators.

    3 years ago
  9. This is really, seriously, messed up. I don’t even know what else to say. We would never dare even *think* about doing things like that around where I live. Can we ship some of our lawyers over there? I mean, that should be a simple enough solution. We have too many, they don’t seem to have enough. We’ll share. Or maybe trade for some of the Kpop idols. How many lawyers per Kpop idol do you think would be fair?

    Back to being serious- I hope that Korea does start to put forth an effort to respect other countries and the rights of the people in those countries. It makes me slightly sick to my stomach to think that they could be so arrogant as to have us pay them for their music, then go behind our backs and steal the work of our artists. (I do realize not everyone there is doing that, but, still… That’s messed up.)

    3 years ago
  10. I live in the US and I work with a few Koreans and when we design concepts, they are like, use google images! I tell them they will get sued and they don’t understand. It’s frustrating. I want to protect the works of others and then when I say they can’t, they still want to do it.

    3 years ago
    • its not a korean thing, i have worked with people like these before too. i mean using it as a concept is fine, but the end product has to be with a licensed picture of something you created. funny thing is, the same people who uses other people’s IP would be fuming if someone else does the same to them. it seems like they grasp the concept of copyright better when they are the victim.

      3 years ago
  11. This was super interesting, guys! I was just reading an article on how Korea and Japan handle music copyrights differently, and Korea is way more easygoing with that type of thing. The leniency goes both ways, because Korea is so much nicer about having random unofficla K-pop videos around YouTube while it’s nearly impossible to find J-pop videos, and they get removed SO quickly. I even notice that once I put a Japanese music video in a playlist on YouTube, it’ll get removed from YouTube the next day, while Korean videos will stay forever and ever and ever. It’s nice for foreign fans because accessiblity is easier, but it obviously isn’t fair to westerners who get all their stuff ripped off.

    3 years ago
  12. Also, I have to say. I REALLY like this TL;DR. I think you should revisit this concept sometimes. You know, like if you think something big is happening in the news and we haven’t asked it, just bring it up. It certainly was a nice surprise.

    3 years ago
    • I agree! I’m sure there are a lot of TL;DR topics that Simon and Martina can think of that maybe their viewers wouldn’t because we wouldn’t know to ask since a lot of us are outside of Korea.

      It was also really cool to see a TL;DR about something that affects them so directly and something they can actually answer from personal experiences. A lot of the TL;DR videos end up being things that they don’t have much experience with in Korea (ie: dating, Korean social issues) so Simon and Martina can only give an outsiders view on the topic.

      3 years ago
  13. Black Face?! Oh lord….

    3 years ago
    • i am honestly asking this…
      is black face really THAT bad?

      i don’t know about all the instances this has happened in korean shows but as long as they’re not making fun of the race isn’t it fine?
      when i read of black face i instantly think of White Chicks
      in the UK too there is a show called Little Britain and one of the white men dress up as a black woman…

      3 years ago
      • Black Face AND White Face are both bad, which is why I don’t like that movie. Even if other people don’t think Black Face is offensive, people of color have said that they don’t like it, and in my experience, when someone tells me that something I’m doing offends them or makes them uncomfortable, I don’t do it anymore, and I don’t try to tell them that they shouldn’t be offended. Not trying to call you out, just want to let you know my opinion :)

        3 years ago
      • There has been more recent debates about this. I think it is a practice no one really cares to bring back, I mean what is the point really? Black face brings up two major issues. 1) It was a way to keep black people out of the entertainment business. It implied that they were inferior performers. 2) It perpetuates lots of negative stereotypes, which is the biggest problem in modern society.

        Recently black face and it’s appropriateness in society has been talked about because there was a fashion article in a major magazine where models painted their skin black. (one being Vogue) Another case was when a playboy bunny dressed up as Lil Wayne for Halloween. Generally said, it is BAD because what practical reason is there to go into black face? None. If you aren’t making fun of black stereotypes, then why wouldn’t you just hire a black person to do the role?

        3 years ago
      • Little Britain is pretty awful for a lot of reasons. It’s just another of those shows which claim to be satirizing bigotry as an excuse to propagate bigotry.

        3 years ago
      • When u think of black face u should probably instantly think of the history of it first rather than current events. It really is THAT BAD. The history is why no matter how ppl do it it is unacceptable

        3 years ago
        • but kroea doens’t have the same history as america, do they? different countries find different thing offensive, blackface isn’t a thing in korea (and in many other countries)

          3 years ago
        • It doesn’t matter. Korea didn’t have black ppl there for a long time as well but now they do & should know why they may face backlash for doing it. Black people, no matter what country they are from, were mocked with blackface. It’d be different if u were talking about a country custom but this is an entire race of ppl we are talking about. Black ppl in the UK would be just as offended by blackface as those in…Alabama.

          3 years ago
        • If Korea wants to go global with K-Pop, then they have to realize that there are things that they can and cannot do

          3 years ago
      • omg yes, black face is terrible! Please read up on it!!!! Even just a little to know WHY it’s wrong http://black-face.com/

        3 years ago
      • Yeah… it’s that bad

        http://populargusts.blogspot.ca/2012/03/three-decades-of-black-face-in-korea.html <- This is a good summary of how it is in Korea

        3 years ago
    • I thought the exact same thing and then had to google the hell out of it…ridiculous.

      3 years ago
    • Yeah… On top of that, they do perform black face on Korean variety shows. Not in ye oldie past but in modern times.

      -_-

      3 years ago
    • I wonder if they know that’s why two Pokemon had to get re-designed oh wait Gen 1 and 2 except for Crystal and Gen 3 never can to Korea

      3 years ago
  14. Has anyone contacted you guys about using stuff that wasn’t yours?

    3 years ago
  15. That law about suing anybody for defamation is something that needs to be seriously revised in Korea. I read an article not long ago (french article, I’m from France) about some journalists who are very limited in their work due to this law. There were brave ones who wanted to use freedom of speech without naming during the presidential elections and they still got “taken care of” o_O

    Stay safe Simon and Martina, I wouldn’t want to hear about you guise being “TAKEN CARE OF” :S *Nervous laugh*

    3 years ago
  16. I own that socks. It’s exactly the same socks without the BB ‘brand’. I think they get it from a wholesaler and re-pack it. I’ve seen korean pop idol pictures on party flyers here. it’s a scam to make people think there is a hot man/girl attending that party.

    3 years ago
  17. is it just me or does this remind anyone of reply 1997 when seo in guk’s character walks around with a bunch of rip-offs? lol

    3 years ago
  18. just keep doing what you’re doing, guise! I love how you guys show different sides of Korea instead of showing it as a “perfect place”…you have tons of us fans supporting you! :) great work…fighting!

    3 years ago
  19. I’ve always wondered about this type of thing because on K dramas they always cover up the logos on everything, but then you see all types of merch or coffee shops with ripped off logos.

    3 years ago
    • I remember the covered up logos on all the cars on Rooftop Prince. The faux logo was a large S I believe that covered up the Ford logo’s. I wonder if that really is enough to make it okay to use the vehicles in a show XD

      3 years ago
  20. SUE THEIR ASSES. (lol jk) but defamation laws? that’s just…no. also, the media is a contradiction of the defamation laws. the media has all this stuff about people doing bad things and they’re not getting sued for defamation. double standards ugh

    3 years ago
  21. Great topic to talk about! I’ve been wondering about copyright issues in Korea for a long time. I had a hunch the variety shows don’t pay for the bg music… Also for example compared to Japan I’ve always thought Korea doesn’t care that much when it comes to using pictures. I mean I started listening to Japanese music before k-pop and I got used to the fact that you can’t even find pictures of JE boys on their website (you can now though) and how visual kei bands don’t like fans editing their pictures or making gifs (especially PS company). But k-pop groups are fine with it and even sometimes tweet the edited pictures without complaining. You also can’t take photos at concerts in Japan but you usually can in Korea. (that’s kinda sad though because concert pics are nice…) I just think it’s kinda weird but I would lie if I said Korea’s way wasn’t convenient for a poor fan like me.

    3 years ago
  22. as far as I know, apple sued a tiny Little CafĂ© in Germany that used a logo looking a bit similar to theirs….so you better watch out, small korean businesses, they sure will come at you soon, too!

    3 years ago
  23. HA! I seriously always wondered how in certain K-Dramas, they could have like 10 different foreign songs in each episode, and be able to pay all those fees… in just one show, they could have over 1 Million invested in the music, and I was like, where do they get the money to do this?!!

    3 years ago
  24. well it’s kind of present here in Philippines too.. Like instead of Hello Kitty, they write, Hello Kiki.. And a nike logo and addidas logo, both, in one pair of shoes…. but nobody seems to care

    3 years ago
  25. I actually remember seeing your video on a certain channel (I’m pretty sure that it was the international broadcasting station you were talking about) and kept thinking “omg simonandmartina what is–“

    3 years ago
  26. You know, it’s funny you mentioned this. My mom mentioned to me–not too long ago–that designers are taking action against these unfair use of property (aka knockoffs). Like fining people that make them, sell them, as well as buy them. I’m not sure if the law is in effect yet or if it will be (Let me check…I’ll get back to you guys on that). I just find it super interesting that this is a topic you brought up because I have wondered before about copyright laws in other countries (especially since I touched on the topic in a class I once took).
    But then it makes me wonder, how are you guys able to use the songs for the KMMs? I’m curious. It there like a set time limit that allows the music to be used in your videos? Or does your blog count as promotion because you give credit to the groups and add the original links after the reviews? Are the change in laws going to affect the way you do business?

    3 years ago
    • I know a lot of companies are getting in trouble in the US for clothing copyright. Not so much knockoffs but from stealing from online artists. Urban Outfitters and Forever 21 had items that stole from Etsy artists. Basically the items were quietly removed after receiving a lot of complaints.

      And I know knockoffs a little more “legal” since the designer still needs to make their own pattern to imitate the other dress. Like buying Chinese knockoff wedding dresses is completely legal.

      3 years ago
    • Fair Use clause under the Copyright laws

      3 years ago
    • They’re allowed to use a few seconds of the songs

      3 years ago
      • I also understand if you distort the original version in some way you can use it…

        3 years ago
        • on youtube, yes. to “sneak” pass the automated content ID “sniffer”. that explains all those mirrored or rotated videos on youtube. for music, people change the pitch/key of the song. LOL

          3 years ago
  27. You should sue them.
    :D
    Or at least get some sort of compensation.

    3 years ago
  28. simon said crazy guy with gloves and i instantly thought “two by two hands of blue”

    but yeah on the actual topic, when i was watching shinee’s wonderful day or w/e i noticed how many of my favorite musicians music they were using like david cook and maroon 5 and i thought it was cool that they used the music but they’re obviously not paying to use it and that personally makes me mad as a fan of those artists

    3 years ago
  29. saw the video and now i have a mood drop, why are those socks so hard to find -sighs- I’m going to korea in September and i wanted to buy a lot of socks

    3 years ago
  30. My boyfriend found an ad in China that was promoting “apple endorsed” ice cream popsicles. No joke.

    3 years ago
  31. My face got used in a photography studio’s brochure when I asked them and signed a form explicitly telling them they did NOT have permission to use my image, so I sent them an angry e-mail, got them to pay for my session plus a hundred more dollars (not even kind of enough) and then collected every copy I could find they distributed to my high school and then burned them ceremoniously in the backyard.

    They made good kindling, though. At least I got some roasted marshmallows out of the whole situation

    3 years ago
  32. It really sucks because my friends and I really want to make english covers of a lot Kpop songs to make it more popular, but we can’t use the soundtracks ):

    3 years ago
  33. Keeps Broadcasting Shit

    3 years ago
  34. What i don’t understand is that korean doesn’t really care about shop’s copyright but on the other hand when it come to kpop companies, there is a huge problem with song’s copyright.

    3 years ago
    • It’s not plagiarism. They rather call it ‘sampling’.

      3 years ago
      • Yeaah, but sampling has to be done a particular way, too, and Kpop companies are starting to get in trouble for both — GLAM’s I Like That got pulled from their youtube channel for an improperly licensed sample, frex. And I’m just waiting for someone at Disney to get alerted to Tahiti’s new track, which is clearly based on and Aly & AJ song.

        SM has gotten pretty good at buying proper rights, though. Then again, they have more international fans that most.

        3 years ago
  35. You saw it and every Nasty what question them about the Copyright XD
    Like you dont have the right to use it. And i was happy that you saw that XDD

    Greets from Germany.. Copyright is a big and expensive thing :D

    3 years ago
  36. international station huh… I think I know which one already. Ahaha

    3 years ago
  37. The kpop companies sure get on people’s butts on youtube for using their stuff. For example a person who might use a kpop video so that they can include Hangul, English and Romanization lyrics so that international fans can learn a song…

    3 years ago
    • Actually, there is some truth to that, but also a lot of it is automated with the system YT users to crawl videos.

      3 years ago
      • Bingo. YouTube has a Content ID system that automatically finds these things and takes action. It’s automated. It’s not like companies can browse through all of YouTube and pick videos to take down. I’m surprised myself with how many times our videos are reuploaded on other YouTube channels as well…

        3 years ago
        • True, but they give priority to big, commercial companies. Which is why NASA loss rights to the Mars rover landing got treated to a DMCA copyright takedown. http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2012/08/as-curiosity-touches-down-on-mars-video-is-taken-down-from-youtube/ All the news companies claimed rights to the content, and the NASA site was actually temporarily shutdown. This has happen a lot. News stations highlighting a viral video on YouTube then filing the video under their copyright, getting the original maker a DMCA notice.

          3 years ago
        • that sucks. for some big corporate company to take down YOUR OWN video when they are the one who took it from you in the 1st place. that really sucked.

          3 years ago
  38. I thought about this in that song by Girls Generation, The Boys. Especially the middle part of the song. Its exactly the same as Rob Base and DJ E-Z Rock in that song It Takes Two. Like serious rip off! I almost can’t believe they performed it live in America without people noticing!

    3 years ago
    • I noticed it too. Apparently “sampling” is hard and extremely time consuming to prove in court. Especially if it’s the artist’s property and not the record company’s. The prices of licensing are usually cheap (to use in a song, as opposed to play it on a show – shows get tons of ad revenue, they can afford more). I don’t understand why people insist on ripping off. For example, I’ve heard in an interview that Weird Al got permission for every one of his parody songs from the artists, every single one.

      3 years ago
      • Important to note here is the fact that Weird Al is covered by another section of copyright law–the right to create a parody–and while he got permission from the artists he was parodying because he’s a nice guy, he wasn’t legally obligated to do so.

        3 years ago
        • TOTALLY true dat. However, considering how popular his parodies were and how much money he had to have made off of them, I think that he was glad for the extra butt coverage in the end even if he only got it because he was being nice and not because he needed it. I think that the artists he parodied probably really appreciated being asked.

          3 years ago
    • There’s a difference between homage and ripping someone off. Don’t forget that the song was composed (and original English written by) Teddy Riley, who’s at least as recognizable a name in American music as Rob Base, and who would know that those lyrics are distinctive and identifiable with “It Takes Two” (which, by the way, sampled its hook from a 1972 song, “Think” by Lyn Collins).

      The partial quote of the lyric was a deliberate reference to the older song, and doing things like that (whether it’s directly sampling a recording or making reference to lyrics) is something that’s commonplace in pop music, whether American or Korean.

      3 years ago
      • I would think Teddy would have gotten the rights to sample the song.

        3 years ago
        • It’s a lyrical reference, though, and while not just the lyrics but the cadence of the rap are imitated, it’s one that a) is insignificant enough to the song as a whole and b) is obvious enough to be recognized as homage. Pitbull’s “Hotel Room Service,” for example, lyrically references a number of songs, including “Rapper’s Delight” by the Sugar Hill Gang and Jay-Z’s “I Just Wanna Love You,” but credits none of the writers of those songs on the song’s credits.

          3 years ago
  39. OMG. This is also common here over at our place .__.

    3 years ago
  40. The label on the socks say BigBang but it has Girl’s Generation on it… WAAAT

    3 years ago
HelloTalk
ToFebruary