Go Premium
Facebook Twitter Google Plus

DICKS – Greetings and Set Phrases

February 22, 2015

Comments

Share Post

We’ve got pretty big DICKS this week; we are going to teach you some basic greetings. In Korean “hello” or “good night” is not always as simple as it seems. How you say goodbye depends on the situation, and how politely you say it depends on who you’re talking to. There are different levels of politeness in Korean, and thus different ways to say hi, bye, and thanks, but today we are going to teach you formal phrases that you say to older people or your superior at work. Here are some set phrases you can use, depending on the situation:

Hi!

– 안녕하세요.
– 안녕하세요! 처음 뵙겠습니다. (Hi, nice to meet you for the first time)
– 만나서 반갑습니다. (Hi, Nice to meet you!)

When you pickup the phone

-여보세요?

When you eat

– 잘 먹겠습니다. (before eating)
– 잘 먹었습니다. (after eating)

During New Years

– 새해 복 많이 받으세요.
– 올해에도 건강하세요

Goodbyes are different in Korean and depend a lot on the situation. Generally, you can always use “안녕히 가세요” or “(조심히) 들어가세요” but if you’re with a group, there are more natural phrases to use.

When you are leaving first

– 안녕히 계세요.
– 먼저 갈께요
– 먼저 들어가겠습니다.
– 먼저 들어가보겠습니다.

“먼저 갈게,” which literally means, “I have to leave first,” is kind of a weird phrase for foreigners, but it is very natural say this after hanging out with group of people. Exchange students or language program students should note this: you should definitely say something to teachers or classmates when you leave.

While discussing this, we also realized these leaving phrases have a kind of apologetic feeling to them. So here are some thoughts of mine on why that might be. Culturally, to show respect, older people than you always come first, so it feels rude when are the first to go, leaving behind a person who is older than you. But even when you are with friends I think people got used to saying something when you leave first, and the custom stuck.

Also in Korea there are lots of group activities and group gatherings. It’s intense. People expect you to be there and do whatever you are doing together until the end. But why feel apologetic? It’s a group time, and leaving might make you feel like you are missing out on some special group bonding experience. These aren’t hard and fast rules. This is only my theory.

“들어가세요”/ “들어가” which means “Go inside,” or “Please go inside.” We say in situations when, in English, you’d say “goodbye.” It is polite to walk up to your front door and say good bye whenever someone is leaving in any culture, right?  Koreans say bye as if the other person is doing a huge favor, as if it’s a sacrifice for you to come to the front door and say good bye. That feeling is part of what we mean when we say “No need to come out, go inside.” It’s also a bit different if you’re at work.

When you are leaving work first

– 먼저 들어가겠습니다.
– 먼저 들어가보겠습니다.
– 먼저 퇴근하겠습니다.
– 먼저 들어가겠습니다. 내일 뵙겠습니다. / 먼저 들어갈께요. 내일 뵈요. (See you tomorrow)

When you are leaving but coming back

Person A : 다녀오겠습니다. (when you leave)
Person B : 다녀오세요

Person A : 다녀왔습니다. (when you come back)

At the very end of the day

– 수고하셨습니다
– 수고 많으셨습니다
– 고생하셨습니다
– 고생 많으셨습니다.

These are incredibly useful verbs to know in Korean. They mean something along the lines of “to make an effort” or to “to take the trouble,” but we use it as a way to say “thanks for your hard work!” at the end of the work day. There are two different ways to use it: 수고하세요 and 수고하셨습니다. Their uses are totally different.

When you leave a store/coffee shop/restaurant

– 수고하세요

When a customer enters your store/restaurant

– 어서오세요

Comments

69

Share Post

Korean Slang

HIDE COMMENTS

DICKS – Greetings and Set Phrases

69 COMMENTS

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  1. Could you please add the romanized or phonetic way to say these things? I can’t read Hangul yet but I am pretty good at memorizing vocab, and seeing the phrases written out phonetically would help a lot. Thank you!

    3 years ago
  2. I’ve learned from watching K-dramas and variety shows the gwiyomi and three bears songs which come across to me as something that you would learn when you are a child but it got me wondering what other nursery songs children learn and what themes they are? For example in the North America we have songs about the railway, farms,various animals, stars, boats, etc.

    3 years ago
  3. um HELLO you GUYS!! English totally has a VERY IMPORTANT pair of set phrases for greetings!

    “See you later, alligator”
    “In a while, crocodile”

    *drops mic*

    3 years ago
    • Min

      Hahahaha this one is especially important between siblings or as a special daddy-daughter goodbye ritual…

      3 years ago
  4. I had an experience related to this when I used to work at a Korean restaurant in my hometown. It was owned by a Korean family. Mom worked in the kitchen, Dad would come help out in front, Uncle made sushi, one daughter ran the bar, and the other was a waitress. When I’d leave after my shift I’d say by to whoever I saw on my way out, but one night after leaving, my manager (one of the daughters) caught me outside and kind of scolded me for not saying goodbye to Mom. From then on I always made sure to find Mom, Uncle, and Dad before leaving so I could say goodbye. It was weird at first, but eventually I got used to it and when I switched jobs I wasn’t working for a Korean boss anymore, so they thought it was weird I found them to say bye when I left! =__= can’t win

    3 years ago
    • You learned it with first hand experience, it would have been better without the scolding part though. Thanks for sharing your story.

      3 years ago
  5. I was so confused by Leighs shirt. Somewhere at the end I realized it means Newspaper. I was thinking the whole time: what the hell is a Jews Paper…

    3 years ago
  6. I tried to explain to my Korean (born and raised) boyfriend about American greetings one time when we talked about what he should do when meeting my parents; I told him you don’t need to be formal, my parents just want to be comfortable around you and want you to be comfortable around them and so you can be a little casual.
    And he says, “Then what should I say?! ‘Yo what’s up?’ SUPER WEIRD!!!!!”

    I tried to explain that American’s don’t just greet with a super formal style “Hello good sir, how are you today?” or a super informal style “Yo whaddup playa” and that most often we just say “Hey” or “Hi” which is a little polite but mainly casual.

    But months later he still just shakes his head and says “SUPER WEIRDDDDD 아이구 스트레스 받았어”

    3 years ago
  7. In Argentina we greet friends by saying “Hola” and a kiss on the cheek, and for good bye we say “chau”, which is a derivated from the italians’ “ciao”, plus the kiss on the cheek.
    Though we only give a kiss depending on the situation, for example, sometimes the whole class will give a goodbye kiss to the teacher, other times just some students will, and in some cases, If they are distant/you don’t feel close to them you just wave goodbye.
    Also If you are being introduced to someone you’ll have to kiss them too, even If you don’t know them.

    In other places of Argentina (I live in Buenos Aires) people give two kisses instead of one, but I didn’t know that, so one day when I was on hollidays I left a dude hanging there waiting for the other kiss, oops!

    3 years ago
    • In Puerto Rico we have the same thing as Argentina, except we only kiss a person on the cheek if we know them. For strangers we usually just shake hands, along with saying “Hola, es un placer concerle,” which means: Hello, it’s a pleasure to meet you. For family though (this is specific for parents, aunts/uncles, and grandparents) we say, “Hola, bendicion,” which is asking that family member to give you his/hers blessing. The family member usually will respond with, “Dios me la/lo bendiga,” which means: May God bless you. This is always done at both, greetings and partings. So when you go to your grandparents home, you ask for the blessing and when you leave, you ask them again for it. Do you guys in Argentina have something similar to this?

      3 years ago
  8. it’s me or Leigh is becoming even more beautiful ? :3

    3 years ago
  9. As a Canadian living in England (formerly living in Korea) I find the British greetings very strange.
    People tend to say “Are you alright?” instead of hello. Over 6 months in and I continue to be baffled by everyone’s concern over my well being. Sometimes it is only “alright?” instead of the full phrase.

    But really, when I walk into a shop and the shopkeeper asks me “are you alright?” I feel like I must look pale or sickly for them to be showing such concern.

    In addition, I live up in Lincolnshire and it is common for people to call others “duck.”

    3 years ago
    • Haha I was just about to leave a comment about the same thing.
      I’m also a Canadian living in the UK and I still don’t know what the correct answer to “alright?” is. I am totally baffled by it. I usually just ignore it.. lol.
      BUT…. that just got me to thinking about how Soo Zee finds “what’s up” to be weird – I guess it’s sort of the same thing! I use what’s up all the time.. But unlike “alright?” I’d actually reply to “what’s up” with a short answer like, it’s all good… or frankly I’d just say what is actually up and say my day has been good/bad/I have a cold/complain about something etc. But I think now we’re getting to the Polish side of my heritage haha :D

      3 years ago
      • Min

        “What’s up?” is a funny phrase… I have always answered: If I’m inside “the ceiling” or outside “the sky”. It frustrates my friends but makes me laugh.

        3 years ago
  10. In Marathi when you’re leaving, in an informal (meaning not in the office or in school) setting, you say “mee yete/yeto” (depending on if you’re a girl or guy). It literally means “I am coming there” but you say it when you’re leaving to kind of say “I will be back sometime” or “I will visit again”

    3 years ago
  11. I keep reading Leigh’s shirt as “Jews Paper” :3 <3

    And look at that heavenly glow you two got goin'!

    Does anyone else here from USA/Europe bow whenever eating out at asian restaurants or when you see asian friends with their parents/relatives? I feel like such a goober :)

    /bow

    3 years ago
    • I tend to bow at everyone!Lol! Not a full, bending bow, but a nodding one. Kdramas have taken over my brain! And I’m okay with that.

      Does anyone else use Korean words or phrases forgetting that other people don’t know what you are saying? The other day I was tellng my mom about the lastest episode of Running Man where KwangSoo and Fei had to kai, bai, bo the servers in restaurants and win or they didn’t get to eat and it didn’t occur to me that she didn’t know what kai, bai, bo was.

      3 years ago
      • LOL… I guess I caught this virus as well. I’m constantly answering people in Korean words, and then have to covertly try mending what I said so that they can understand me. The KZombie virus is too strong for my brain to fight off.

        3 years ago
        • I’ve greeted Engineering clients from banks in Korean and get this awkward… “Sorry, what?” every time.

          I actually have to go back to Bucheon to do some Civil Eng’g work -_-;; I’ll bring my beard and warmer clothes this time

          3 years ago
    • I did a study abroad in Korea where I learned to bow to everyone essentially. When I got back to the States, it stuck with me so I bowed to everyone for a good month before stopping the habit. I got a few looks but felt incomplete without my bow and quietly saying goodbye in korean.

      3 years ago
  12. Hello guys.
    I don’t wanna be a dick, but there are incorrect expressions.
    For example,
    먼저 갈께요 > 먼저 갈게요
    내일 뵈요 > 내일 봬요 or 내일 뵈어요

    http://krdic.naver.com/rescript_detail.nhn?seq=4638
    http://krdic.naver.com/rescript_detail.nhn?seq=6371

    Thanks :D

    3 years ago
    • Totally missed that, it is still confusing… Thanks for not missing this. :D

      3 years ago
  13. I’m from the US but I studied in Hong Kong for a semester and it took me a while to get used to them never knowing how to reply to “How are you?” or “How’s it going?” They would always get all awkward and brush it off without replying. I was later told how they always greet each other “Have you eaten?” It was also weird for me when they would ask “Where are you going?” as a greeting and never really want an answer to the question. If I answered they would look at me weird and say I’m not supposed to actually answer the question and just say hi back. They also say “I’m leaving first” like a lot of other Asian countries it seems. Just some things I found really interesting while there.

    3 years ago
  14. I’m from Sweden and I think we do it the same way as koreans about saying goodbye. Like, one of my friend she always just says bye and leaves or she doesn’t say anything at all and I’m every time I just stand there baffled like ‘what just happened’ and I always nag at her for not being more “elaborate” with her goodbyes (?).
    If you’re leaving before everybody else here in Sweden we just go “I’m sorry, I have to go now. I have to go home and study.” or something like, we just kind of quickly explain WHY we have to leave.

    3 years ago
  15. In Denmark we really don’t go without saying goodbye Oo and when I see american film and people just hang up – don’t you guys say bye before hanging up Oo how would you know if they are done talking?!

    3 years ago
    • It’s completely rude in the U.S. to hang up on someone without saying goodbye in some fashion, even if you are very close–people will trot that out as a grievance “And then he JUST HUNG UP ON ME!!!” They’ve cut that custom out of movies and TV to speed up the pace, but people will often joke about how rude the characters are being.

      3 years ago
    • I was just thinking about what we do in Denmark, and I noticed today that whenever I part with my friends I hug them all individually and say “goodbye”/”see you later” or something like that- whenever someone just leaves it’s weird and rude xD

      3 years ago
  16. When i leave i say something like “see ya”, “see ya later” or “i’m gonna go now/first”, stuff like that! Not just me but friends and just a lot of other people i’ve heard…it’d just be strange if someone left without saying, that’s just disappearing!!

    In Bengali we also have a set thing to say when we leave the house and then our parents will reply with a set answer ahaha! I’m not gonna attempt to spell it out in English cos i wouldn’t know how!

    One thing i love about England is the greetings when buying something (Of course not all places or every person does this, for me it’s mostly been women). It’s just lovely and makes you feel warm when you go to the counter and the person greets you with a “Hi there darling”, but then usually it’s when you leave and they say stuff like “There you go lovely/darling/sweety/gorgeous” or even “Here you are (while handing the purchased stuff) my love” and so on that makes the shopping experience better! Ahaha!

    3 years ago
  17. This is my first time commenting – just wanted to say that this is far and away my favorite channel on EYK. I recap dramas for a k-drama blog, but since i’m not fluent in Korean (one day!!) I often miss out on the slang (and sometimes the puns, which is tragic). Watching your videos has been very helpful, since all of the phrases you’ve covered show up with astonishing regularity (I’m thinking of 썸 타다 and 깡 especially). Self-study helps, but the resources I use are more about grammar and vocab, and they don’t even scratch the surface of contemporary slang. So thank you so much for this segment, and I hope you keep it going for a long time!

    Also, if you need new phrases, could you explain 어장관리? I learned this phrase recently, and though I doubt I could explain it, it’s definitely one of my new favorites.

    3 years ago
  18. In France we often end up phone calls by saying “Bisous” which basically means “Kiss. It became a way to say goodbye to friends :) (you can’t say “bisous” to your boss or someone you don’t know that well)

    3 years ago
    • Whautttttt? This is amazing, I will use this to my French friends!

      3 years ago
      • Say it twice: Bisous bisous!

        Because you know, the French kiss both checks and that two kisses!

        3 years ago
  19. It may sound weird but I miss Leigh’s and Soo Zee’s DICKS

    3 years ago
  20. Where I’m from in Northern Ireland when we’re leaving normally we’ll say “I’m away!” instead of “I’m going.” or whatever. You can also say “She’s away” -> “She left”. You can also say “Is that you away?” -> “Are you leaving?”.

    For greeting as previously mentioned “What’s the craic/Any craic/etc” but you can also say (this is super local) “Bout’ ye?” which is short for “What about you?/How about you?” meaning “How are you?”. “Hows you?” and “What about yourself?” are also used a lot – all same meaning.

    Lastly there’s an extra one which isn’t a greeting but “Is that you?” DOES NOT mean “Is that you?” it means “Are you finished?” (logic, I know). So you would usually respond with “That’s me.” (“I’m finished”) or “Not yet.” Often used in conjunction with “I’m away.” so “That’s me, I’m away.” is also common. The way we speak English is a bit weird I guess haha

    3 years ago
    • Yeah, I was confused for a while when an Irish roommate I had would always say ‘will’ when actually implying ‘should’ e.g “WILL we go to the party?” (as if it would be decided by some outside entity), and I’d be like “Err… I don’t know, will we?”

      3 years ago
      • Yeah I think we borrow a lot of grammar from Irish language, even if we don’t actually speak Irish so that might be one. So you might hear a lot of syntax that doesn’t make sense to you, but is natural for your roommate (and me :P). If you’re not sure, just ask :)

        3 years ago
  21. Checking in from Canada and there are a lot of us that use “Cheers” as a goodbye/ending to e-mails as well. Or even to say sort of “thank-you” at times. For example, in a purchase or restaurant, after you receive your good someone might say “here you go” or “Thanks” and the other might reply “cheers”. It’s more of a casual thing, I think, with a bit of a “stay well” connotation! Maybe our British/European roots lend to that habit!

    3 years ago
  22. In Mexican culture, its important to greet and say goodbye to everyone. And I mean EVERYONE. One of the reasons why I hate family parties because I always have to say “Hi” to my aunts, uncles, and cousins. Especially if you haven’t seen them in a long time. Even with my friends, when someone arrives they go around greeting everyone individually and when they’re leaving we each say goodbye to them individually. And since we like skinship (lol) we hug each other or do that kiss on the cheek when saying bye or hello.

    3 years ago
  23. First thing that came to my mind is that in polish slang and in informal conversations between friends we often use “sorry” to apologise instead of “przepraszam”. “Przepraszam” means “sorry” in polish, but most of the time we use english “sorry” to apologise for minor things like e.g. bumping into someone on the street and the normal “przepraszam” when we really mean it and want to apologise for something serious. We somethimes even add sufixes to “sorry” to make it into e.g. “sorka” or “soreczka” so it’s even more informal, but you usually say it jokingly.

    3 years ago
  24. I’m from the northeastern US, where most people are considered to be very reserved but there are a wide variety of greetings and eye contact situations. As a socially awkward person in general I have a hard time navigating the different levels of friendliness. When I lived in Costa Rica for a year I LOVED how easy it was to greet people. Everyone is friendly. You shake hands with total strangers, but after that it’s a hand on the shoulder and a kiss on the cheek, even with the opposite sex. Very easy. And most people say “chao” for goodbye. You are expected to announce your arrival and departure even if you come in late or leave early, which I found difficult. I prefer to go unnoticed. I do appreciate commonly accepted rules for greetings so I don’t get that awkward “what’s up” or “how are you” when they aren’t really asking.

    3 years ago
  25. Hey Soozee and Leigh, I have a Question for you guys. I was watching Season 1 of Roommate and in the 5th episode Minwoo was saying how when Ga yeon called Shin Sung Woo Oppa, he was laughing but “the tips of his toes were moving”. I’m American so I don’t get this at all. Can you explain it for me?

    3 years ago
  26. JC

    Just to give a little background on maybe why “What’s up?” or “Wassup?” is an American thing, it was the central theme for some Budweiser commercials back in the early 90’s, including their Super Bowl one (they are youtube). In one, it got changed to “Wasabi”. My family still uses that one as a greeting, saying it back and forth a couple of times. Yeah, we sound stupid but it’s a family thing.

    3 years ago
  27. Please correct me if I’m wrong, but have you gone over the difference between “bromance” in English and Korean? I recently had a very awkward situation with a Korean friend of mine when I used the term.

    3 years ago
  28. Pacific Islander/New Zealand Kiwi phrases(Not all use though):

    “Cheer Bro” equivalant to “Sup”
    “GAP it” same as “We are leaving”. Usually used in a group of people example. We’re gonna GAP it(implying some of the people are leaving). Much older may not be as used as often

    Abbreviated Australian(What i use specifically *LAZY LANGUAGE*):
    “Howsit” Meaning How is it going?/How are you going?/How are you feeling?/ How have things been?
    “Gday” – Good Day, also a form of greeting
    “YO!” – when responding to someone you know who has spotted you and greeted first.

    CHALLENGE: Create your own SLANG and see how far you can push it.

    3 years ago
  29. One I can think of off the top of my head is milf. “M.i.l.f” ( mom I’d like to fu**)
    Used when talking about someone’s mother who you ….errm find attractive
    Ex. “Have you seen that woman over there with 3 kids? Total milf.”
    I myself have never used it though haha

    3 years ago
    • Totally unrelated to the topic but this was the first dicks video on my feed so I wanted to share this slang word lol :p

      3 years ago
  30. Omg ㅋㅋㅋㅋ can I be apart of the eatyourkimchi crew!?!?!…..even though I’m not in Korea…YET!!

    3 years ago
  31. I am originally from Minnesota and now living in Toronto. I think we have our own variations of set phrases. With family and friends we usually announce departure, with strangers we always announce departure and in every shop I have worked in (smaller businesses) we always say good-bye.
    Typically the family exchange goes: “I should head home.” Gets up followed by hugs and Kisses all around. They respond “It was great to see you. Drive safe.” I walk to door. “Thanks! I will see you later.” They say, “Buh bye!” I say, “Bye!”
    Strangers or acquaintances depend on situation, but usually involves a lengthy combination of thanking for invites, reaffirming how nice it was to talk to them, followed with best wishes or hopes to see them again soon.
    Work usually involves running around the shop saying to everyone, “Alright, I am taking off. See you tomorrow!” Usually with a, “See you tomorrow,” or a “Drive safe,” or “Have a good night.”
    So, I would say that while we do not have one set phrase and response, we have multiple polite phrases that are too be used if one does not wish to appear rude. The system in English is just far more complex from the sounds of it.

    3 years ago
  32. Min

    Well as Californian/Mexican-American cheek to cheek “kiss” is part of my greetings and my goodbyes… I have noticed that in Mexico we start to leave about 10 minutes before we actually leave… you start your departure by alerting everybody to the fact that you are leaving saying “bueno, ya me voy.” or “bueno, ya me tengo que ir” and that means “well, I’m leaving” and “well I have to leave now” respectively. And basically what happens is that whatever everybody else was working on or chatting about is dropped and the attention is on the person who said that and people will start a list of recommendations like “cuidate” (take care) “salúdame a la familia” (say hi to your family for me) but that is never the end because someone will ALWAYS remember something that they just HAVE to tell you RIGHT THIS MOMENT before you leave. jajaja.

    3 years ago
  33. Hey guise, you should shed some light on the word “기집애”. After many years of watching kdramas, I get the gist of it but a clear explanation would be nice to know ^^

    3 years ago
  34. When I lived in the Virgin Islands, I learned “Good Day”, “Good Evening”, and “Good Night” were both forms of saying good bye as well as greeting someone. It just depended on the time of day. Took me awhile to get used to it and when I moved back state side I still continued to do it for a long while afterwards which some people found weird.

    3 years ago
  35. oh, tomorrow i will start Korean language lessons >< little bit nervous, i'm not a smartest person in the world :)

    3 years ago
  36. Hey! As a teenager living in the States, most of my friends and I just say stuff like, “see ya”, “later” or “gotta go.” And in reply it’s mostly “see ya”, “bye”, or “have fun”. It’s very casual even to people who I don’t know very well. But leaving without saying anything is kind of weird and awkward if you had a conversation, unless it was a very short conversation. Then it’s completely normal. And even if a person says bye, it’s normal for some people to not reply. Although everyone who I hang out with or go to school with makes it a point to say bye so as not to leave the room awkwardly without saying anything and they also say something back.

    3 years ago
  37. nothing wrong with bowing. I’ve started bowing to people the Korean restaurants/and markets around me,especially the older people,without even thinking about it.

    3 years ago
  38. I’m in the States.
    I had a coworker (a contractor) who kinda reported to me. She made a point of saying goodbye to me every evening. But most of the time if we’re at work, people just leave. If we see someone as they’re leaving (or when we’re leaving) we’ll say “bye,” “see you tomorrow,” “have a good evening” etc, but it isn’t required to say goodbye.
    Neither is it required to say “hello” – so I’ll often get asked “is such-in-such here today?” my response is often “I haven’t seen them” and sometimes I add, “but I haven’t been looking” if it is a close colleague asking.
    With friends, sometimes I say goodbye if I’m leaving first, or I just leave. “Gotta go,” “bye,” “see you later” and a tad more formally “I need to leave now, ya’ll have a good evening” If it is a party, I try to always tell the host goodbye if I leave first. I was raised that it is rude to not say goodbye when you’re leaving a party or someone’s house. Especially someone’s house.
    In the South, leaving someone’s house without telling them goodbye is considered extremely rude. But there is not really a prescribed phrase.

    3 years ago
    • Min

      Oh it is rude to leave a house without saying goodbye!! When I went over to my friends house I always made a point of greeting and saying goodbye to everybody that was home. My friends whould look at me a bit weird though because I’d be specifically looking for their parents to say goodbye. That might just be me though, my parents raised me super old-fashioned and emphasized respect towards the adults.

      3 years ago
  39. In Greece we have a simple way of saying hello and goodbye. It is pretty much like “aloha” in Hawaii were one word means both. “Γειά σου!” (Yeeah soo/singular/반말) – “Γειά σας!” (Yeeah sas/plural or 존댓말). “How are you?” would be “Τι κάνεις;” (plural/polite: “Τι κάνετε;” btw the semicolon is the question mark in Greek) which mean both how are you and literally “what are you doing?” (right now). See ya! is “Τα λέμε” (tah laemae) which literally means ttyl. I once taught a Greek class to Korean women living in Greece and they particularly liked the last one because they said it sounds like saying 딸래미~
    Thank you for the info~ I am brushing up on my Korean because I will be in Korea in a month for my wedding and knowing which hello and goodbye to say will be very useful!!! :D
    (Last time I was in Korea the hellos and goodbyes were THE most awkward parts for me, not being sure what to say :P)

    3 years ago
  40. Something that I hear is peculiar to the South in the US is that we greet people on the street. If you make eye contact with someone, one will say “Hey! How’s it going/How are you doing?” and the other will respond with some kind of set phrase like “I’m doing pretty well! And you?” If you don’t want to say anything it’s perfectly acceptable to smile and nod too. Ignoring people when you’re passing in close proximity is weird if neither says anything, but it’s rude if you don’t respond in some way when the greeting is given. I’ve had friends from other parts of the country say they didn’t know what to do when they first encountered this.

    3 years ago
    • I spent some time in South Africa (grew up and still live in Ontario, Canada) and had a similar experience! Everyone would at least smile when passing on street, but that’s a bit of an odd and uncommon thing to do here! I really liked it though! I wish it was common place in North America!

      3 years ago
    • That’s true! I never noticed the eye-contact thing until I left the South. I guess greeting strangers isn’t commonplace everywhere.

      3 years ago
      • i’m from the south and i spent a year and a half in ohio and people looked at me like i was completely bonkers if i would greet them. once i was taking a walk and waved at one of my neighbors who i had not met and said hello, the dude actually looked around like “is she waving at me?” then crossed the street to avoid passing me!
        another thing that seems to be peculiar to the south in the US is giving a wave or a nod to someone who let you pass them while driving. you are also supposed to do this in a parking lot, if a car stops to let you pass to give a little wave. people in ohio looked at us , once again, like we were crazy trying to figure out if we were waving at them. in the south it’s like a little “thank you” or “excuse me.”

        3 years ago
        • Min

          actually that wave in the parking lot to people who let you pass is something that we also do in Yucatan, Mexico and something that I did see quite a bit of in California.

          3 years ago