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It’s coooooooking time! I really love Korean savoury pancakes. They’re super easy to make and you can throw any ingredient inside of them. Today I’m making the most basic Korean pancake, 파전 aka Pajeon which is a yummy savoury green onion pancake.

The 파 (pa) part of this word means green onion, not to be mistaken with 양파 (yangpa) which is a white onion. The 전 (jeon) part of this recipe doesn’t translate exactly but rather means “anything dipped in a flour + water kindof batter and pan fried”. So for example, you can go to a jeon restaurant in Korea and order Seafood Jeon, Kimchi Jeon, Tofu Jeon, Oyster Jeon, Meatball Jeon, Zucchin Jeon, OR why not order 모듬전 (modem jeon) which means “assorted jeon” and get a mix of all of them? Just don’t mistake 전 Jeon for 튀김 (twigim) which is deep fried food!

To begin with, this recipe is ABSURDLY easy to create. You can’t screw it up. Any so many people have differing opinions. You want more greens onions and less batter? Go for it. More batter with a few sprinkled onions? Super duper. You want to add an egg to the batter rather than pour it onto while it’s cooking? Knock yourself out. I tested four different versions of the recipe before I settled on this method so it’s just my personal favourite.

Green Onions

Thought all green onions were the same, huuuuuhhhhhh??? Note, if you didn’t already, please go back and re-read that HUUHHHHH as Kanye West’s cameo in JYJ’s “Ayy Gurl”. The type of onions I’m using is like a cross between a chive and a green onion. It’s flat and thin but also wide. The stem is thicker than a chive but not tough like a green onion. I included four diagrams of different onions to help you out since I know different parts of the world have different types of ingredients. Now I do admit, I have had Pajeon in Korea that used picture 1 type of onion, the original “pa” if you will, but it was so tough when you but into it you just pulled out the whole onion awkwardly. Yup. Flapping in the wind like a cow eating grass. Moo. The reason I used the “Asian” chive is because you can easily tear it with your teeth but it also holds up against the heat and doesn’t turn into brown mush inside your pancake.

green onion1

green onion2

green onion3

green onion4

Cooking Tips

When it comes to making this pancake, the hardest part is actually the cooking. You want it to cover the surface of the green onions with batter as well as fill in the gaps between them so that it holds together. But don’t drown them, otherwise you won’t be able to taste them inside your thick doughy pancake.

When it comes to cooking it, you might want to do a small test run. Too hot a pan, the pancake burns and the inside is a gooey mess with uncooked onions. Too low of heat you might not get a nice crispy exterior. And have fun flipping it. I know I did. EVERY damn test pancake was a perfect flip and then on camera, KERRSPLAT!!. Listen guise…NO STRESS OR ANYTHING BUT IF YOU DON’T NAIL MAKING THIS PANCAKE THE WORLD MIGHT BLOW UP!! AGHGAHGHGAJHGJHGJH!! Ha ha joking. *crazy eyes*

Dipping Sauce Comments

If you’re Simon, you’ll be dipping this pancake in ranch, but for the the rest of us, the soy sauce + rice wine vinegar combo is a must. You’re welcome to adjust the amount of vinegar and sugar to your taste, I prefer more sour things so start with half the amount and add more to your taste. If you don’t like spicy food, leave out all the red pepper stuff.

Onto the recipe!

Pajeon Recipe (Savoury Green Onion Pancake)

Batter:

1 cup flour
1 tsp salt
1 cup cold water

Filling:
a big bunch of green onion (end stems cut off)
1 egg (beaten)
1 sliced red pepper (optional)

Dipping Sauce

1/4 cup soy sauce
1 tbsp rice wine vinegar
1 clove garlic (minced)
1 tsp sesame oil
1 red pepper (diced and de-seeded)
————
1/2 tsp sugar (optional)
1/2 tsp 고추가루 gochugaru aka hot pepper flakes (optional)

Hardware

1 small sauce bowl
1 big mixing bowl
1 big flat frying pan
long cooking chopsticks or tongs
1 ladle for pouring batter
1 flipper

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Take all the dipping sauce ingredients and dump them unceremoniously into a small bowl. Let them mingle and get to know each other for at least 20 minutes.

2. Dump the flour and salt in a mixing bowl big enough to fit the length of the green onions. Whisk in cold water to prevent it from being lumpy. Lumpy Space Princess batter sucks.

3. Beat one egg and set it aside for later.

4. Wash the green onions. Cut off any parts of the stems that are too tough. I also like cutting off the joined stems so that I don’t bite into one end and drag out three onions with it.

5. Get yer frying pan ready! Put it on medium heat and add oil for frying. Swirl the oil to coat the pan. NOTE: Use a pan big enough to match the full length of the onions. You want to be able to lay them out in the pan flat like a carpet. If you don’t have a big enough pan, chop the onions in half to match that pan size.

6. Once the frying pan is hot, gently place your green onions into your batter and coat them. Try to keep them in as straight a line as possible. You don’t want to violently stir the green onions into the batter and have them sticking up all crazy. The flatter the better.

7. The next part you have to work quickly! Using tongs or long cooking chopsticks, gently place the green onions which are now coated in batter into the hot pan. Try to lay them out as flat and evenly as possible. Quickly take the remaining batter and fill in any gaps between the onions to join them into one unified pancake. Use your flipper to shape the pancake if batter is spilling around like crazy.

8. Watch the surface of the pancake. After 1-2 minutes it will change from being liquid to being more solid with little bubbles starting to pop. At that point, pour the beaten egg evenly all over the pancake. Use the flipper to keep the egg from spilling out onto the pan, and fold it back onto the pancake.

9. After another 1-2 minutes the egg will become more solid. Use the flipper to gently check under the pancake to see if it is brownly nicely or burning rapidly. You want to flip it once the other side is lightly browned.

10. Once the other side is lightly browned, prepare to flip the whole giant pancake like a boss. BOOM! You just flipped it perfectly like a boss. I’m proud of you.

11. Let it cook for another 2-3 minutes checking to see if it’s browning on the other side. All together, it took me between 6-8 minutes to cook the pancake depending on how thick I made it!

12. Serve the pancake by slicing it into a grid shape and serve with the dipping sauce. You can use red pepper to garnish if you so please! Enjoy!

—–

Final comments! If you don’t eat eggs, the egg is not totally necessary so feel free to leave it out. Also, since the flour to water ratio is 1:1, you can easily make this recipe bigger or smaller, and feel free to fool around with different type of flours. I tried whole wheat flour and it worked, but the pancake was much tougher tasting. If you are gluten free, I’ve used Bob’s Red Mill GF All Purpose Baking Flour and it was awesome for pancakes!

If you do end up making this recipe, don’t forget to leave a comment and let everyone know if you ran into any difficulties! The more tips and tricks we get from each other the better our Pajeons will become. Hahahah I feel like that sounded SO serious, like “WE CAN RID THE WORLD OF EVIL IF WE ALL TALK ABOUT OUR GREEN ONION PANCAKE EXPERIENCES”.

EDIT: Some people found the pancake batter to be too salty, so I reduced the salt from 1 tbsp to 1 tsp. I realized that I use a very chunky sea salt so it’s probably not a true tbsp and if you use fine grain salt it’s probably SO MUCH SALT! Thanks for all the notes everyone! ^^

ToFebruary
  1. How can I make this not smokey? I use olive oil and after a while the pan starts to smoke and the fire alarm goes off… :/

  2. I know I’m a bit late lol
    But I just wanted to tell you that you do an awesome job and I’m amazed by the variety of categories you do videos on. Your videos are professional but also funny and not boring like the most cooking shows. Also the part where Martina failed at flipping the Pajeon showes that little mistakes happen but I think that made the video even better because it happens to me all the time.
    Greetings from Germany!

  3. Thank-you so much for this recipe Martina!! I finally tried it out and my family loved it!! Everything went really well. I could only get regular green onions, so I sliced them up really thin and they turned out great. I need to make a lot more next time ^.^

  4. Martina, I was wondering if you could put up a Gluten free version of a Pajeon recipe! I have tried…but failed. So I was wondering if you have had any success and if so could you post it!
    Thank you very much!

  5. I think it is important to precise that you should use RICE flour. Plus is gluten-free. A good vegan option is to use egg substitute and mix it to your flour, it ends up EXTRA crunchy. Anyways, thanks. I made something delicious inspired by you. Couldn’t take a picture, we ate it straight from the pan.

  6. I recently re-watched some of your older videos from 2009/10, I can’t believe how much you guys have improved! I don’t know much about video scripting/filming/editing but I can still tell that this cooking video is amazingly put together! I love how you make use of all the semiotic channels, how the visual and the accoustic signs, verbal and non-verbal, come together or work against each other to make a whole that is more awesome than its parts. What I’m trying to say, this is a really fun video!

  7. 1st time commenting on an EYK video, here we go, 8D

    So this is my second time making pajeon, the first time I used a recipe from Marja Vongerichten’s cookbook. This recipe was simpler, so I said ok. I picked up some Chinese chives from an Asian supermarket (I used scallions with Marja’s recipe). The scallions are a familiar taste unlike the Chinese chives, but the chives are better for cooking because they are skinnier and cook faster. I made this recipe using whole wheat flour, which looks strange in the bowl but it fries we’ll enough. I only used about 1/5 of the bunch of chives and ended up with three large pancakes. I cut the chives in half, otherwise I’d need a satellite saucer to fry them in. I used sesame oil to fry the first pancake (not reccomended), then I used vegetable oil for the next two; I put egg on the first two pancakes, but not the third. I need a better handle on this recipe because I think I made them too thick, but I didn’t want to end up with too many pancakes. One thing from Marja’s recipe I would HIGHLY reccomend is mixing in rice flour for a better crunch. The first time I made pajeon I mixed half all purpose flour and half rice flour, and the batter was spot on. I made the sauce from this recipe, awesome tast since I like salty and sour

    That’s my two cents for this video/recipe, thanks EYK

  8. can you teach us how to make Bulgogi (the spicy kind)

  9. I went to the Asian store and got the onions. They were called ‘green nira’. Not sure if that is the correct kind. uhhhh my pajeon dough was gooey on the inside even after cooking for a long time. How do prevent that in the future?

  10. Official pajeon report: I used the second type of green onion (only kind I could find at the grocery store) and it turned out fine. And by fine, I mean DELICIOUS. Food tastes so much better after you’ve seen a FAPFAP on it. Flipping, though… I failed. Miserably. The edge of the pajeon caught on the pan and left this big glob of batter. You’ll forgive me, right? Right?

  11. Wow, I love cooking new food at home and this pajeon looks pretty easy with the right ingredients. Just wanted to know what sauce Martina used? How do you make it?

  12. How do I turn this into a kimchi jeon recipe? Do I just replace the green onion with kimchi?
    > I should probably google/youtube it…

  13. Dear Martina~! I’ve just done pajeon. I don’t used to cook, so it isn’t very good, but my younger brother and father ate a few pieces and said it isn’t bad, but next time my pajeon should be thinner ^^. I think i used too long chives for my frying pan and made too much batter T_T Anyway, thank you for this recepty, I’ll looking forward next one ~( OuO)~

  14. Have you tried these with almond flour or coconut flour? If so, how did it turn out?

  15. Can I check for the dipping sauce would any soy sauce do or does it have to be korean soy sauce?

  16. oh how i love watching this video right now when i’m working overtime and extremely hungry………..

  17. Dude… eating kimchi pajeon with makgeoli on a rainy day…

  18. Haha I’ve tried making Pajeon before i’m pretty sure i didn’t make it right lol, and the recipe used made multiple large pancakes, and with me basically being the only one in my family with adventurous taste buds I basically had to eat it all myself… until my Dad tried it and then decided to eat it with maple syrup… which made it better for him… but my brain was like “NOOOOOOoooo that just doesn’t seem right…stop…”(-OoO)- but I had to shut myself up for i knew that the only way for all of it to be eaten was if he ate it the way he wanted to… still makes me shudder to this day. So now my main source of Korean food if is at my friends house. Mmmmmmm…. rice and side dishes….mmmmmmm marinated sesame leaves… and kimchi… oh the deliciousness. *drools* (*ㄱ*)

  19. Whoops, read the recipe wrong and ceremoniously and tenderly placed the dipping sauce ingredients into a bowl. It worked out.

  20. side note… I am very close to delete my youtube account. I’m constantly marking that I don’t want google+ connected to youtube (which is not official) and they don’t get it. I don’t want google+ at all. Today I can’t even comment as youtube is bugged as hell. I’m so furious and hopeless that I had to tell about it.

    • Yeah we sent big looong emails to YT with screenshots of all the buggy behaviour. I know with such a huge platform it’s going to have some major bugs. The one thing I really like about the google+ merging is that they used the google+ comment thread system. So now on YT ppl can actually reply and create a readable thread! That’s awesome news. But the juggling between accounts can be annoying right? :|

      • All my problems are created because I don’t want to have google+, I don’t need it. I don’t have facebook. I’ve kept my twitter account only because I want to share things here. I’m not the person “let’s share things with bunch of people who are following me” as I don’t have such people (raised in different times and I’m not into it). What I hate the most is that they are forcing me to do sth I don’t want to do and I don’t need to do and I feel very bad about it.

        replying on YT is more clear for sure :)

    • Same! I can’t comment at all either, so I left some pretty foul-mouthed comments in their Feedback. I don’t want to make a stupid G+ page for YT, then have it all screwed up when I log in. It’s REALLY annoying.

      • I have 6 G+ YT accounts/names/channels created on YT. SIX. Every time they asked me if I want one I’ve marked “stay with YT” then “don’t want G+” and then I needed to cut the connection, because they’ve created it anyway. They’ve kept it. SIX + the one I’m using. I can’t erase it otherwise I will delete the one that I want. Feedback. One day I will send them a letter, maybe they will read it ;).

  21. Oooooh this are soooo good!!!! I’m very glad all the fresh fruit/vegetable markets around here (there are like 4 in the same avenue) are all from Korean owners…. They sell big bags of the Korean scallions for $1!!!

  22. 파전(pajeon) is pan cake made with green onion (파).
    부추전(buchujeon) is pan cake made with Asian chive (부추).
    What you show in the video is 부추전(buchujeon), not 파전(pajeon).

    May be you are confused?

    • Nope I’m not confused which is why I included four different picture screen shots explaining that I’m using the “Asian Chive” rather than green onions! I don’t like using green onion in my pajeon because it’s too tough and when you bite in it pulls out of the pancake! If I call it a buchujeon it will just create chaos for ppl who have never heard of that kind of pancake and wonder how to make pajeon. Since they are made the exact same way, ppl can choose to use whatever onion they please! :D This is just my little twist on a Korean recipe! ^^

  23. I can’t wait to make a mixed vegetable version of this :D Thank you Martina~~

  24. “WE CAN RID THE WORLD OF EVIL IF WE ALL TALK ABOUT OUR GREEN ONION PANCAKE EXPERIENCES”.

    Oh if only it were that easy… I’d make these damn savory pancakes that look super delicious every day! :D

  25. You can put some other ingredients like octupus? Because I went last week to the korean restaurant here and they put some other ingredients, I think was octupus =O btw, Is look yuuumy~ Se ve delicioso ^^!

  26. Yum! I had these the first time about a month ago for my birthday. The restaurant made kimchi pajeon. It was so yummy. I need to try this recipe!

  27. “or a parallelogram” ahahahahha i loved the way you said that way too much!!!

  28. I absolutely love making pajeon. It really is simple and so far everyone who tried it loves it. I make mine usually with lots of veggies including but not limited to onion/ green onion, broccoli, carrots, mushrooms, peppers and bean sprouts. Obviously with that many veggies I have to chop then up for the best mixing. Lol. I also use a lot more salt then normally recommend…I like salty….

    But however this is made…it’s simple and delicious

  29. Wow, this is a cool and easy recipe, I will have to try it soon. I just wanted to mention that I recently discovered that I could substitute young coconut juice in a can(is that what it’s really called?) for water in my asian dishes, even coconut milk instead of milk and it just adds a little more subtle yummy flavour to the dough/thing, especially for simple dishes like this. I know you like coconut Martina, so give it a try ^_^

  30. The Badger Song will always be relevant!

  31. My dad makes something similar-ish. It’s chinese and when I was little I called it chinese pizza. But it basically uses #2 of the spring onions. You take all purpose flour, a bit of rice flour, eggs, and water. You mix all that together (even the egg) with chopped pieces of the green part of the onion. And so instead of having strings of the onion, you just have little pieces of it. IT’S SO FREAKING GOOD OMG. I hope that made sense and maybe you guys could try it! It’s so delicious and nostalgic for me.

  32. A nice alternate dipping sauce: mustard mixed with chipotle, chili flakes, and a touch of honey. Use a good spicy brown mustard for best results.

  33. OOOHH MAN!! This made me think of the wonderful courgettes/zucchini pancake the sister of my korean boyfriend used to do! She did this quite a lot in the morning when i was in Korea for the summer! The recipe is so simple but SOOOO good ^_^Long live korean cuisine!

  34. At :10 what is that tune from?! I’ve been trying to figure it out for almost a week and I can’t remember ;_; Anyway, this looks really good and I can’t wait to try and make it^^

  35. I used regular green onions…it was bad lol If you really want to use them though just slice them up thin and put them in, it didn’t taste bad the onion just wasn’t cooked, so I was chewing giant pieces of raw green onions >_< I love your cooking show by the way Martina ^_^

  36. When you have enough recipes posted or even just collected, would you consider making a printed cookbook and selling it through your site?

  37. A little tip: Add about one teaspoon of soy sauce into the pajeon mix to get a nicer brown color and also it’ll tastes more savoury!!

  38. @Martina Wow… thanks for the simplified recipe… I am a fan of korean jeon and even made kimchi jeon myself too…
    Definitely will try this one out…
    One thing worries me is whether it would taste like flour since it is just flour and salt? Hope it will turn out delicious haha…

  39. Martina’s cooking show would be sooo awesome. I’d watch it all the time and then make awkward references when cooking dinner. Too bad I don’t have such an impressive spatula…

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