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Korea vs Japan

March 28, 2013

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For starters, I’m sure some people might see the title of this blog post and video and jump into the comment section, guns blaring, keyboards smoking from all the rage typing. Korea vs Japan! There’s bad blood between Korea and Japan, for reasons that we can’t do justice in explaining in a short blog post. We see these tensions pop up often in our YouTube comments, if we ever mention anything Japanese. I know it’s gonna be the same in the YouTube comments to this video. But I know you blog readers are more civil than that, and can focus on the discussion at hand. Which is why we love you all. Thanks for coming here and leaving great comments. The discussion in last week’s Sexism in Korea video here on the site was wonderful. Thank you all for that.

We’re hoping that we can keep up the discussion with this week’s topic of differences between Japan and Korea. Basic differences, that is; stuff you might have noticed. Not talking about differences in language or culture or history or politics. Just different experiences of both countries. We mentioned a few in our video. There are tons more. Some that we didn’t mention that you might find interesting:

DVDs
Japan has a much bigger disk culture, it seems. We saw tons of DVD shops, and huge, sprawling DVD sections in stores for soooooo many things. Old shows, like Alf, had the complete DVD sets available in Japan (seriously who the flurk would buy an Alf complete set?!?!). In Korea, though, we BARELY see any DVDs. It’s unfortunate. When we first came to Korea, we could rent DVDs from the convenience store, and saw a few DVD shops around the area that we could get movies from. Now, our convenience stopped renting out DVDs, and those rental shops are closed. I’m sure we could find DVDs if we went out looking for them, but they’re nowhere near as pervasive as they were in the places we visited in Japan.

Taxis
Korean taxis are freaking cheap! To be honest, I don’t think I ever took a taxi before coming to Korea, because taxis are so expensive everywhere. Sure, they drive like maniacs and we feel like we’re in danger every time we’re in one, but they’re cheap! In Japan, taxis are crazy expensive. We never went into one, but we were told to stay away. You know, damn: we should have tried it just to see what it was like. We can’t compare the prices because we’re not sure. Maybe Japanese taxis are not as crazy expensive as people make them out to be?

Driving
You know how we feel about driving in Korea (it’s the worst). We always feel funny whenever we go to Japan, because on the first day we’re always like “Don’t cross the street yet! It’s our light, but this mofo’s gonna kill us!” but that never happens. Cars stop behind the lines they’re supposed to stop at! It’s amazing. Korea: we love lots of things about you, but we hate your driving the most!

Speaking the Native Language
Ok, so this one we’re not too sure about. Please let us know if you’ve experienced it differently. Here’s what we kinda thought: whenever we saw interracial relationships in Japan, between a foreigner and a Japanese person, they very often spoke to each other in Japanese. In Korea, though, most of the interracial relationships we’ve seen have people speaking in English. Is it just us who noticed this? We don’t want to form any speculations as to why, or if this is indicative of different countries and their perceptions on language. Maybe we just fluked out and saw a few instances in Japan of people speaking Japanese, when in reality foreigners don’t speak it too often. Or maybe lots of interracial couples in Korea speak Korean to each other (but we seriously barely know of ANY). Thoughts?

Lots of Different Kinds of Foreigners
In Japan, we saw many more foreigners than we do here in Korea. Most of the foreigners we meet here are English teachers, while in Japan we saw lots of different foreign families, with baby carriages! Seriously barely see any foreigners with baby carriages here. Maybe foreigners leave their babies at home? Ha! That was a joke. But, seriously: we heard people speaking German, Russian, heard a lot of Nigerian accents, and just saw more multicultural diversity in Japan than we do here in Korea. Maybe because we were just in the touristy parts of Tokyo, while it could be that outside of those areas foreigners are totally screwed? I don’t know.

Restaurant Service
We talked about how we dearly missed vegetables when we went out to restaurants in Tokyo. Another thing we really missed that we couldn’t really articulate in a short video was the level of customer service that we missed from Korea. Wow. It’s one of our favorite things about this country. If we go to small restaurants, not the big franchises, and there’s an ajumma (older lady) working there, she treats us like we’re family. She’ll talk to us fondly, let us know if our jackets fell of our chairs and are on the ground, will flip our meat for us, give us extra side dishes not on the menu for free, and just so much more. One of our favorite places in Bucheon (OH WE MISS YOU SO MUCH BUCHEON!) – our favorite Samgyeopsal place in fact – had the sweetest ladies. They loved Martina’s hair, would talk about it whenever she redyed it. There’d even be moments when they’d pull of loose strands from Martina’s jacket. During the winter, they’d heat up sweet potatos, not available on the menu, and bring them to us. Damn! They were so kind and caring! And that’s not just for that restaurant: we get similar treatment in lots of other restaurants in Korea. We never got that in Japan. We did for that Best Sushi in Japan place, but that was more because he was passionate about his art, rather than being kind and caring, you know? Who knows: maybe we just went to the wrong restaurants in Japan, but we remember feeling that lack of care in Tokyo restaurants.

Anyhow, that’s it for now. I’m sure some of you will mention something and we’ll be like “Oh right! Totally forgot about that!” And then we’ll copy what you said, put it in the post, and then delete your comment, like it never happened. Ha! We wouldn’t do that :D

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Korea vs Japan

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  1. In japan the food is good but it’s sooo expansive and they only give u little bit and in subway or bus stops when u ask question they say there is a map over there go look for ur self but in Korea subway and bus are so simple it say were u go and other things

    2 years ago
  2. Also kimchi taste way better in Korea

    2 years ago
  3. Hahaha, let’s talk about ajumma (older lady) in korea.

    ajumma literally means aunt in korean, as does ajussi (older gentleman) means uncle. it refers to an older lady, usually married, but not necessarily.

    an ajumma is the most beloved thing in korea, not only because she’s older, and lady, but because she carries with her special aura with her–she’s kind, she’s generous, sometimes she can be harshy, but cares about you. no wonder the word itself means aunt!

    there was a set of jokes about ajumma in korea while ago (like 10-20 years ago), which i wouldn’t go further execpt an example, mainly because i can’t remember them well, and because it would cloak the post. anyway, the idea behind it is sometimes her actions seem funny, and selfish, but her intentions are always good, and lovable. because her actions are from her love for the family. and because she’s such a harmless person, who’s physically weaker, and should save her strength to care for the family. (ex. when in a bus, when there’s empty seat, an ajumma would be the first person to catch the seat–since she has to go home, and cook and care for the family. etc.)

    korean culture is very much family-oriented. and many of you would probably know about this, but we not only call older lady ajumma (an aunt), older gentleman ajussi (an uncle), but also calls older friend either hyong (an older brother) or noona (an older sister), and younger friend dongsaeng (an younger brother or sister). also, we always call seniors either harabuji (a grandfather), or halmeoni (a grandmother).

    3 years ago
  4. Hello I usually dont bother to comment on internet but I just wanted to share my personal (opinion dont get me wrong ^^) experience. so u guys mentioned that how couples speaking English in Korea and in Japan they speck Japanes? I think it is because like u guys mentioned most of foreign people live in Korea, they are living in Korea as English teacher thus they are usually not encourage to speck Korean and if u live in Seoul u don’t actually need to use Korean that much. in addition many Korean people see u differently if u speck English

    3 years ago
  5. Why hello there. I see you have strong feelings about Korea and Japan. However it is against our commenting guidelines to be disrespectful. Which this post obviously is. If you persist in posting disrespectful and inflammatory comments you will be banned.

    Cheers
    Natz

    3 years ago
  6. Hmm, thanks for the information. I wonder if Korean hoe is served anywhere outside of Korea. It would be interesting to taste the difference.

    4 years ago
  7. Eri

    Maybe you mean Omotesando? It’s actually not Harajuku anymore (as harajuku itself is just actually just a part of shibuya) Close to the Harajuku station everything is mostly for teenagers, especially takeshita-dori, this is the über-hip fashion most people know and mistake for the overall japanese style. Omotesando on the other hand has many foreign high fashion brands and is very expensive but if you go to the sidestreets it’s again more of a younger harajuku vibe. And you can get your VEGGIES there!! = ) If you ever go to Tokyo again and miss your veggies: I can recommend “brown rice cafe” I love this sooo much, it’s vegetarian japanese kitchen and organic! Just opposite of brown rice cafe is also the “crayon house” which offers vegtable all you can eat! I could name some more places, but these I like the most : )

    4 years ago
  8. whenever i’m in Japan, they always start off speaking English to me, until I respond to them in Japanese.

    4 years ago
  9. “Japan has a much bigger disk culture ” they have a lot of anime dvd’s don’t they?

    I dont know about the spoken language between interratial relationships… it might be just a personal preference thing…like they’re trying to learn different languages so they agree beforehand to talk in a certain language …I don’t know :)

    I’d like to think that the reason, behind Japanese men and women dressing black and white, would be because they’re ninjas undercover and they want to stay away from the public eye as much as possible :)

    And about the Japan x Korea conflict. I think what was in the past should stay in the past. People can acknowledge it but shouldn’t feel pressured. I love both Japan and Korea.

    Awesome TLDR! ^^

    Love you guise (>*-*>)

    ♥♥♥♥

    4 years ago
  10. third question

    4 years ago
  11. Is restaraunt service bad in Japan compared to Canada too, or just in comparison to Korea?

    4 years ago
  12. I studied abroad in Tokyo from last September to February of this year and one thing that stood out for me was how every single Japanese female wore a skirt every single day, no matter the freezing temperatures. The only exception I saw was if girls were coming from sports practice and very clearly wearing their team sweat-pants. I do not even own a skirt, so my college Japanese friends seriously approached me to express their concern over me wearing pants every day. I don’t know if it’s because these girls were trained to wear skirts every day from primary school dress codes, but from college to the workplace, when you can wear your own clothes, all the women continue to wear skirts.
    I have only been to Seoul during the summer, when it was too hot to wear pants comfortably, so I wonder what is like for the rest of the year/seasons? Anyone who can comment comparing fashion in the two places?

    4 years ago
  13. One of the major differences I noticed when I visited South Korea, if the attitude of people on the trains. In Japan we DO NO TALK ON PHONES, and definitely not in loud voices (In fact there are signs in all trains asking you to put your phone on silent and refrain from talking, if not turn it off). We generally don’t have loud conversations either. Or eat (unless it’s a shinkansen). From my visit I saw that Koreans are, in general, polite and respectful, but from a Japanese perspective I found train trips to be different to those back home. But in saying that, I totally agree with you two about the actual train system: WHY CAN’T ALL THE STATIONS BE AS EASY TO WORK OUT AS THEY ARE IN KOREA??!!

    4 years ago
  14. Funny you’d mention sushi, cause it’s like the opposite situation with my Mom. She hates sushi in America because they are just mushy pieces of blandness to her. Good sushi/sashimi, for her, needs to be fresh and firm that requires good amount of chewing. I guess that’s preference shared by most Koreans, so that’s why all the sushi places in Korea are like that, different from sushi places in other parts of world run by Korean people.

    4 years ago
  15. Simon and Martina did not compare which country was better than the other. They were comparing about how things are different in each of the countries. They love both Korea and Japan. In fact, they have talked about wanting to move to Japan and start Eat Your Sushi. But yes, I agree with you that it can get very annoying and frustrating when people want to debate or discuss two or more countries and talk about which one is better. But this is not what Simon and Martina did in this TL;DR.

    4 years ago
    • I think they want to eventually do both. I think whenever they do Eat Your Sushi, they will still keep doing Eat Your Kimchi too.

      4 years ago
  16. When I was in Japan, I was talking to a Japanese guy who went to college in Korea, and I talked about wanting to go to Korea. These are the things he told me about Korea. He told me that the food was very spicy so I had to be careful. He said that in Korea, everyone is in a rush and is telling you to hurry, but they often show up late. And he talked about how they add ‘ya’ to the end of people’s names. When I went to Korea, I realized that the food was spicier than Japan’s, people were rushing around much more than Japan, but yes still did manage to keep us waiting. I guess he was right :)

    4 years ago
  17. Isn’t the “men don’t cry” the very same reason why they cry in dramas or concerts? It heightens the climax and I feel for a lack of sleep highly stressed young idol in a concert would feel teary after a sudden difference in burdens. That and fan service. Hmm.. my point is it’s not that the men have different sensitivity.. or something.. But what the public finds ok. Real tears.. is a very manly thing.

    4 years ago
  18. LOL did Simon just say ” I achurry ” ?

    4 years ago
  19. You guys should definitely check out other areas of Japan–Tokyo is one of the biggest metropolitan cities in the world and is really quite different from the rest of Japan. Outside of Tokyo you see fewer foreigners and I feel that people (in the Kansai region especially) were also much warmer. I lived in Kyoto last year and spent some time in Osaka and Kobe. It’s vastly different! Tokyo seems to exist in its own bubble.

    4 years ago
  20. Hmm. I was wary when I saw the title, but after watching the video and reading the blog, I’d say you handled the topic really well. I can’t speak for the Korean aspects, but I found myself nodding along with most of the things you observed about Japan.
    Also, I can get really sensitive and defensive when it comes to anything Japanese, but you didn’t set off any alarm bells, so I doubt you’d offend anyone from that side.

    Good job!! ^^b

    4 years ago
  21. Because they live in Korea and have been for five years and have been to Japan two times. Eat Your Kimchi is about Simon and Martina’s experiences being in Korea. Their videos have helped other foreigners, even k-pop stars, who have come to Korea to live or visit.

    4 years ago
  22. You guys are so brave…seriously. I don’t think I would have the guts to bring up Korea and Japan in the same youtube video. More power to you!

    There are just a few things that I want to comment on based on my experience living in Japan for 3+ years and living in Tokyo and beyond.

    1.) The subway/train system.

    I can see your point about how it’s nicer that the Seoul subway system is managed by one group and so it’s easier to get around and about in Seoul. Tokyo and the mutant spider web that is the subway system is pretty complicated and that’s usually why most people I know take the above ground trains. I really only used the subway maybe four times the two years I lived in Tokyo. I stayed mostly on the Yamanote line and a few of the private train lines. And of course always use Hyperdia. Hyperdia is your friend and saves you from having to use a subway/train map which is ridiculously complicated even when it’s in english. It really takes about six months before you’ve got Tokyo’s transit in your head. Y’all might want to look into getting a suica card next time you’re here.

    2.) Pornos.

    While I completely agree that the amount of pornography available to the average individual on the street (and visible by minors) is ridiculous in comparison to the west and Korea, I would like to point out that you were staying in Akihabara which is pretty much the pornos center of Tokyo and Japan at large. True there are also many things available in Akihabara to the average nerd on the street (Models, video games, maid cafes and butler cafes) but there’s no where near the same amount of porn out in the open in say, Harajuku or Meguro or Shinbashi, etc… Y’all were kind of staying in Pornos city if you catch my drift.

    3.) Speaking Japanese….

    I’m going to be brutally honest here, the Japanese are terrified of doing something, anything wrong. They will freeze in place, petrified at the thought of making a mistake and so that’s why a lot of them simply won’t speak english, even if they know it and they’re quite good at it. They are afraid a foreigner will correct them and thus embarrass them. (You know because when someone makes a mistake in English we all Hulk out and destroy property and egos.) It’s a big deal and as a teacher it’s something I deal with on a frustrating daily basis. I can’t managed to coherently form a sentence more complicated than “I like chocolate” but because I don’t have that crippling cultural fear of making a mistake I happily blather on at my students like a drunk six year old. So that’s why a lot of foreigners speak japanese to their japanese friends ad co-workers because we can’t get them to speak english to us! *HULKS OUT* Not without copious amounts of beer and then really, everybody is speaking the universal language of booze.

    4.) Veggies

    Japanese cooking has a strong emphasis on seasonal foods so you’ll often find that restaurants will change their meu based on what’s in season. So since you came to Tokyo in February a lot of the veggies in season are root vegetables and previous veggies made into pickles. Fresh side veggies isn’t really a japanese thing unless you count shredded diakon with your sashimi. They like to boil, pickle and saute their veggies or slice them up and serve them in a weird salad. If you really want veggies then your best bet is to order a salad or look specifically for a vegetarian/vegan/Shoujin ryouri place. Summer is a different story but sadly, you guys were here in February. Which doesn’t even have cool treats like Sakura mochi.

    I hope I haven’t offended you or anyone else and I do hope you will come back to Japan and get a chance to visit Osaka, Kyoto, etc… They’re beautiful and a complete differently experience from Tokyo.

    4 years ago
  23. Well more than tv vs reality, it depends on what part of the country you’re in as well.
    I lived in the southeastern province of Korea and apparently men there are know to be more rough, less emotional, men of few words, and generally perceived as more “manly”
    But then again, that applied to the girls as well. It was kind of a joke that Seoul girls want a southern guy and all guys like Seoul girl.. opps getting off topic.
    But w/the men crying, apparently it’s really attractive to Japanese girls b/c they feel Korean guys are easier to talk to. Just what people have told me over the years. Haven’t really seen this in person so don’t know how valid it is.

    4 years ago
  24. Kk

    Looking snazzy, Simon!

    4 years ago
  25. Hi Simon and Martina; I love your TL:DRs its what got me into you guys in the first place :D Just a tip maybe it’s best to choose your title better if you don’t want it to sound so antagonistic? e.g. Differences between Japan and Korea or Our experiences of Japan vs Korea communicates the topic more clearly to me. That title stokes the fire unnecessarily when it wasn’t meant to invite conflict remember it is a sensitive issue and does put people on the backfoot.

    4 years ago
    • I agree with you there :/
      When I saw the title, without even watching the video or reading the blog post, I had a big sense of dread in the pit of my stomach :(

      4 years ago
      • Thanks fuuko (Annalita?) BTW I’m an Aussie too from Melbourne :) yeah hopefully people will view the video and read the blog to get a better understanding!

        4 years ago
        • Annalita = An(derse)n(L)alita :D

          Melbourne > Sydney *runs away*

          4 years ago
  26. I reaaaally enjoyed this post! since i live in Japan and all ^_-

    the flyer thing does exist in Japan, but it’s much different, and i’m pretty sure not illegal (if equally annoying…) people will usually stand outside of train stations and hand out either flyers, or tissue papers with advertisements on them. in the summer, the often hand out “uchiwa”s (big round plastic hand fans) with advertisements on them. the thing is, the fans and tissues are a good idea, but a) there’s only so many you can take and b) it’s really not gonna make me go to your store/restaurant/etc. also, at my station, it’s always the same 3 people advertising the same 3 shops. it’s like dude, you see me and try to give me a flyer every single day and i’ve lived here for a year and still not been to your hair salon. get a clue!!

    i’ll cook you veggies next time you come!!!! or better yet, i’ll take you to this organic food restaurant near my house! (lol… since i’m not an amazing cook, eheh…)

    it’s really cool to hear that the little worker bees in korea like to dress up!! yeah, in japan, there’s a reason they’re called “salaryman” and they all look the same – as they should (according to japanese mentality). do you know the japanese proverb “the nail that sticks out gets hammered down”? that explains a lot.

    about the language stuff… i think the reason for the difference is that (forgive me for saying) Japanese people really suck at english. when they can, they’ll speak to you in english, but it’s not a great percentage of the population that can, but they’re usually pretty eager to speak english and it often happens that you’ll meet a stubborn person who tries to express themselves in broken english, even though your japanese is blatantly much better. also (and this kinda makes me laugh) i can’t tell you how often i’ve had someone bump into to me and then eagerly say “sorry!” and walk away looking so proud that they’d spoken english to the foreigner. lol

    but yeah, i do think that a lot of things that you noticed are because you were in Tokyo… outside in the boonies, it’s a lot different and much less “multicultural”, if you will.

    4 years ago
  27. A possible reason for the interracial relationships speaking Japanese is maybe it is an easier language to speak? It might just be me and maybe not the same for non-english speakers, but (since I’m trying to learn both languages at the same time) I find that I pick up on speaking Japanese a lot quicker. I feel like for Korean there are more sounds that are difficult for my mouth to shape and make sounds right.
    Overall wonderful TL;DR!

    4 years ago
    • I agree. Japanese has five absolute vowels (a, i, u, e, o) and that’s it. Korean has like twenty-one (including the diphthongs)…

      4 years ago
  28. Simon and Martina, about the speaking the Native Language, I believe you are right. I am half Japanese and half American, and when I went there last summer NO ONE would talk to me because I looked American and that I was a bit taller than some people. During the trip, many people would bump into me and would just say “sorry or gomennasai” and just walk away. If you go to Harajuku, there are more people who are interested in foreigners. When I saw a group of girls in awesome colorful costumes, a cameraman walks up to me and asks in English what I think about this group of girls. He was surprised that I spoke Japanese to him. Harajuku shops (to me at least, this doesn’t mean it’s a fact) they are more open minded. They gave me discounts on clothes and accessories when they found out I lived in America, but that could just be me. It does seem that no one talks to you unless you have a Japanese friend or relative that speaks out toward people. This is what I experienced from my 3 months.
    About the restaurants, you maybe be right about that too. It seems like the the waiters or the chefs, aren’t to talkative to their customers. I noticed in restaurants where they have less people, (like this one restaurant in this subway) the people were very kind. The people in the stores like seven-eleven or sankusu, the people are very kind. But it could be because I had my elder grandmother that was born and raised in Japan. I guess it all depends on who you are with. I don’t know, I could be wrong. But it does seem like the chefs and waiters are quick in taking in orders and making the food. I hope this helps!
    PS: Next time when you go to Japan, you should go to Mister Donuts!!

    4 years ago
  29. It’s creepy ass “Sea Cucumbers”.

    4 years ago
  30. I understand what you’re saying. The very masculine male figure holds a high place in Latin American culture. The definition of machismo is “exaggerated masculinity”. Exaggerated, as in over the top. Obviously you don’t mean every Mexican man is super macho, you’re just speaking about general cultural references.
    As for Korea, I wouldn’t make any generalizations about Korean men from Korean dramas because dramas are designed to appeal to female fantasy. The guys are doing things that women WANT to see, because they don’t usually see it. Telenovelas work the exact same way. Romantic comedies work the same way.
    What I do think you can take away from dramas (and telenovelas), and the pop culture of any country, is a sense of what a country or culture values.

    4 years ago
    • I agree that one should not make generalizations about a country from its media and assumed that was why the person asked the question in the first place. I too have been wanting to know if normal everyday Korean men are generally more expressive with their emotions then lets say normal everyday American men.

      Although the media, as said before, is not an accurate representation of a country and its society; it can give clues to its social norms since media ultimately helps shape social norms. I do disagree with your statement that Korean dramas are designed for the female fantasy. While yes some of the dramas most likely have a larger female audience, many are on major networks that both sexes watch and therefore contain elements that pertain to both females and males.

      4 years ago
  31. I’m living near Tokyo with my Japanese husband and we visited Seoul over New Year’s.

    About international couples speaking Japanese: Maybe there are more in Korea, but I’ve met tons of guys (it’s ALWAYS guys) from English-speaking countries who have been living in Japan for years and don’t speak the language. Here, if you don’t speak English and it gets a bit more complicated, people will sometimes just ignore you or tell you they can’t service you.

    When we went to Korea, everyone would just speak to me in Korean (after trying to speak to my husband, who does not speak a word of the language), and I actually thought that was pretty cool. As said, in Japan, even if you just look foreign, you’ll see the panic rise up inside shop staff in the eye of “OMG I’LL HAVE TO ENGLISH!”, and they’ll try to not serve you at all apart from paying, while being absolutely obnoxious if you are or speak Japanese.

    Tokyo’s public traffic system is confusing when you’re not used to it (and it’s freaking expensive), but in Seoul we often had to walk forever to just switch plattforms. Next time, try Hyperdia.com, you just have to input where you are and where you want to go and it tells you how to get there, the site supports English.
    And yes, taxis are expensive. From the train station to our home, a distance which takes 12 minutes to walk, you pay almost 1,000Yen (almost 12,000Won). In Seoul (and even moreso in Taipei), we would just use taxis when we couldn’t be bothered to walk, and while the driving might be crazy, it’s just soo much cheaper.

    The suits are a bit special, my husband has to wear one too and has given me some insight. It breaks down like this, basically:
    Fancy shoes (especially patterns) -> shop staff
    non-black suit, young -> shop staff, non-office job
    non-black suit, older -> higher position inside the company, my FIL wears pinstripe suits and coloured shirts and he’s almost as high up as it goes, if my husband did the same thing, he’d be in trouble
    Women in suits -> shop staff, job-hunting or in their first years of work, otherwise they change to something a bit prettier.

    With Japan many people think it’s very individualistic, in large part because of the Harajuku girls, but they’re not really seen as role-models, as smart or as having potential, especially if they are above a certain age (22, when most people finish university). When talking about it with Japanese people, their main response is “They should just grow up.” Japan is a very sad country when it comes to expressing individuality through appearance. Germany, where I’m originally from, might not be as colourful when it comes to clothing and styles, but I feel there’s more acceptance towards people who don’t adhere to the norm.

    4 years ago
  32. Simon: ” i just want to know who runs the inflatable, obnoxious thing industry in Korea because they are freaking loaded. Everybody is buying it from them”
    Me: *shouts at screen* “BROHOHOHO?!”

    4 years ago
  33. 6 years in Japan (western Tokyo mostly) and 9 in Korea (Gunsan and Seoul), this pretty much what I saw. Tokyo is definitely more expensive, yet Korea feels like capitalism rum amok at times. In Korea, a clothing shop will close and after a day remodel a restaurant would open, while Japan is more stable. I’ll take driving in Japan over Korea any day, wrong side of the road and all!

    4 years ago
  34. Ren

    If Korea doesn’t have DVDs, then what DOES it have?

    4 years ago
    • everyone shops online! there are even online rental shops. So offline shops are difficult to keep up.

      4 years ago
      • Ren

        Oh, right, duh >_<; …I guess in America, it's kinda divided evenly. DVDs are bought, not rented; renting and buying can be done online or via cable service (like OnDemand).

        4 years ago
  35. Simon and Martina, those black suits with white shirts tend to be the “uniform” of the job hunting ones, or the newly hired. Those who have had a job for a little while start to develop their work attire to sorta conform to whatever job they have…

    4 years ago
  36. I just want to make a quick comment about the portion in the blog post about interracial relationships in Japan vs Korea. I recently met up with a Japanese friend of mine who was visiting the US with her American boyfriend who started out teaching English in Japan, but he’s doing something else now. Anyways, I did find it interesting that he’s trying to help her learn English better, but in their side conversations to each other when they were trying to decide how to reply to something I said, they were speaking purely in Japanese. Of course, I don’t know how much of either language they use when it’s just the two of them, but I did find it interesting that they were kind of teaching each other, while falling back on Japanese when they needed to.

    4 years ago
  37. Hi guys! I know this question is controversial but I’m really curious and like hearing different perspectives. I live in the states and I recently did an English paper on healthcare in different countries based on the documentary Sicko. I saw that in Canada they have universal healthcare and I was wondering if it is the same in Korea. I know Martina broke her ankle a while back and I was wondering if she had any problems getting treated because she was a foreigner, or if you had problems getting healthcare if you have it. Sorry if this is a bad question. Thanks! MB.

    4 years ago
  38. I have to disagree with your comment on restaurant service in Japan. But I’m going to have to preface this by saying I speak japanese. I think, unless you make a conscious effort in Japan to talk to the locals, they are not just going to come out and start a conversation. Many of them don’t feel confident speaking in English, so unless they think you speak japanese, they’ll pretty much leave you alone.

    However, I have had many wonderful conversations with locals. When I lived in mitaka ( close to downtown Tokyo) I used to frequent a city called kichijoji. There is a tea shop there, and one day I took my friend who is a big tea enthusiast there to see it. While we were looking at the counter displays for tea( and talking in Japanese) a nice older lady came up to us and started talking, telling us how to select the best ones. She told us we need to eat the dry tea leaves, and then had the attendant pull some out while she critiqued them with us.

    Another time in kurama ( a small town an hour out of Kyoto) me and my friend stopped at a family run traditional japanese restaurant. It was the summer time, and they had the best umeshu! As we were leaving we got into a long discussion about how they make everything from scratch, and they were very friendly and open with us.

    There are many more examples, but the point I’m trying to make is that I think you have to be a little more proactive in showing your love for their culture. I’ve been to both korea and Japan many times, and I actually get the opposite feeling of what you wrote above. But I know it’s not because Koreans are inhospitable , but because my skills in the Korean language aren’t good enough to have that interaction with them. I don’t know if I said that very well, but that’s just my two cents

    4 years ago
    • Ah, your observations about the knowledge of the language ( and culture too) makes a lot of sense.

      4 years ago
  39. Idk why, but there are so few Japanese people here in the US, like in schools and stores you see Koreans, and Chinese, Vietnamese, Thai, Philipino, etc, but not Japanese, unless is someone mixed, so here too, to the sushi places I’ve been to I hear them speaking and i’m like “ohh Korean” >.<

    4 years ago
  40. It seems to me that Korea has had an increasing global presence (culturally speaking) In the last 5-10 years, whereas Japan started a bit earlier, which would explain the international families. I grew up around central Illinois (which many see as quintessential middle America) in areas where the Asian population was generally very low, and Japanese language classes started becoming available at more schools in the past few years, but I haven’t gone anywhere yet that has Korean language classes (though I hope to go to U of I for my masters – fingers crossed!). Idk if this is just me, but it seems like Korea is just now starting to approach the Zenith of cultural globalization, so perhaps more international Korean speaking families will appear in the next 10-15 years. Who knows!

    4 years ago
  41. I personally haven’t been to Japan, but a friend of mine has and she talked to me about it, and one thing that she said is that people are very cold and not very friendly or sociable. That probably explains why the restaurant service was the way it was. Another thing that explains the people speaking Japanese is that the Japanese prefer that people make an attempt to use any small amount of Japanese that they know, rather than speaking English… From what my friend said, most of the people in Japanese have a really hard time speaking English. Being a linguistics major and having taken Japanese language myself, that’s pretty understandable. Japanese language has a very different structure than any Latin-based languages, and the grammar is Japanese is so simple, whereas in English, it has what is probably the most complicated grammatical structure (besides Latin, which isn’t really spoken anymore). So hopefully these second-hand observations, as well as my own observations about the language are informative.

    4 years ago
    • i totally agree about the language class, it seems america went through a love japan time in about the early 90’s. I’m american and i have an easier time with japanese then english. with korean im haveing a very hard time with understanding the sounds or atleast the correct ones. i did notice that many japanese write and read english really well.
      but you do have to realize the culture is based off of respect for others. i made many japanese friends while traveling, they would take me their house and feed me or show me around ( some paid for my way) and i didnt once have to buy my own saki. the thing is that they dont make friends with you, you have to put in the effort.

      4 years ago
  42. Great TL;DR! I feel so happy when I read these blog post, especially if it’s about these nice ajummas from the Samgyeopsal restaurant and of course the cheese lady!! Please visit Bucheon and meet them to give them some flowers or like that! I think they would be so happy and that would be so sweet!! :)

    4 years ago
  43. NOT THAT IT’S ANY CONCERN TO ME OR ANYTHING but I’m wondering if it’s legal for people to have a couple porn files on their laptop when they go to Korea (though I suppose if anyone was concerned over this they could just store some files on Dropbox before leaving and download them when they get there, maybe… not that it’s a concern to me). I heard that message appears on free porn sites because if it’s free then underage people can see it, so they are trying to stop underage people.

    4 years ago
  44. On the topic of interracial couples in Korea mostly speaking English and in Japan mostly speaking Japanese. In my experience it is a lot easier for foreigners to pronounce Japanese words than Korean words. I’m guessing maybe foreigners and Japanese in a relationship in Japan are more likely to speak Japanese because they are more comfortable pronouncing Japanese words than a foreigner and Korean couple in Korea.

    4 years ago
  45. has living in korea affected some f your old habits or created new unusual habits that you probably would have never done if you stayed in canada? (btw i’m from canada 2! XD)

    4 years ago
  46. This makes me feel a bit bad because I’m definitely a part of that interracial couple that speaks English in Korea. I know enough Korean to get by, but I really need to study it. I’ve also noticed that interracial couples are more rare in Korea, people still kind of act surprised when they ask “Wait, you two are together?” I think Japan has more immigrants, or people interested in traveling and working there, so they meet and date Japanese people more naturally then in Korea.

    4 years ago
  47. I asked this on youtube as well, but I don’t know if you were able to see it. I am really curious so:

    You guys mentioned the flyers and advertisement that are thrown on doorsteps, and that just got me wondering…

    How is the waste management in Korea? Are they big on recycling? How clean is the environment?

    In Canada the homes have strict limits (of 1 to 2 large bags depending on where you live) on how much garbage you can put out on the curb, and homeowners have to separate the recycling, trash, and organic material. If they see mixed up garbage, the trucks refuse to pick them up. Also, if you want to put out extra garbage, you have to buy tags to put on the extra bags. (All of these changes have happened in the GTA recently)

    So how environmentally friendly is Korea? Are there any strict government policies/laws related to waste management/ the environment?

    4 years ago
    • Do you know that waste management is done by the cities? Because it’s really funny to read you saying “in Canada, it’s like that” as if it was all like that coast to coast. o.O

      But I agree that it’s a good question about Korea. I remember when they explain that there is no public garbage bins and that they are rationed with garbage bags… it sounds silly but it’s all fuzzy in my memory. Anyway, I’m very curious about how does it work in Korea (or Seoul, assuming it’s not the same in every cities)

      4 years ago
    • simon and martina have a video of the Korean recycleing on their youtube if you browse videos and then go oldest to newest you will see it.

      4 years ago
    • I am curious about this too. I remember you guys having that video of the recycling at your apartment, but it didn’t seem that good. Just different sized plastics for different containers. Do they recycle VHS, car seats, diapers (yes you can recycle those, but not many people do), electronics, paint, etc?

      I am curious since I know Japan has a rep of being generally really wasteful. Youth have little respect for the land, and although there are activists on preserving Japanese land, basically if it is a wild animal, it is endangered. A lot of the packaging is crazy, and wasteful. Sorry guys, ramune soda- that little marble and thick glass- it adds up! And I think the marble is plastic inside a glass bottle so therefore really isn’t recyclable (unless you break the glass and fish the marble out which isn’t safe)

      Anyways, I am always curious how much awareness there is to some of the “hippie-dippie” eco-friendly things. Veganism, Organic Foods, Sustainable Farming, Sustainable Fish, Hybrid Cars, general “green” being tossed into all products.

      4 years ago
      • Oh yes, I didn’t really elaborate on my question too much, but I want to know about all of this too :)thanks.

        4 years ago
  48. Xye

    Or maybe the Yoyogi Park area? It’s right across the street from Harajuku station. No idea what the neighbourhood’s called though =X

    4 years ago
  49. The reason you saw a ton of foreigners is because you were in Tokyo. I remember my mom saying that she once was walking with my father down the street in a rural area of Japan and the people were so surprised to see a foreigner that they would always look twice at my dad… even the people who were driving. (I think she said somebody almost crashed because they were turning their head back to get another look). I also remember her saying that she was at an airport once and a couple of Japanese women came up to her asking if my sister was a halfie (half Japanese, half American) and they asked if they could take a picture with her.

    4 years ago
  50. In Germany, we have wifi passwords, too – and for outside Internet we have to pay a monthly amount.

    4 years ago
    • Yeah! What’s up with that? I’m from Peru, and my airport has free WiFi – and all the Starbucks here have a password, but the staff will gladly tell you if you ask them. When I went to Denmark (via Germany), I couldn’t get WiFi without having to pay! In both airports! And both Starbucks had no WiFi! And the networks redirected me to sites where I had to pay with a credit card for 15 minutes of WiFi! Inconceivable!!

      4 years ago
    • Imagine free wifi while riding DB and waiting for your 40 minutes late Train.. Down with these expensive Telekom Hotspots!

      4 years ago
  51. Do you think Takeshi’s Castle was just a program about Japanese people trying to make their way through the subway?

    4 years ago
  52. Hi guys! I am about to move to Korea for school in a couple months and I’m so excited! I’ll be there for about 3 to 4 years and so I was curious what the healthcare system was like there? Do some doctors in Seoul speak English? Can you get insurance if your a foreigner? And what has your experience been with the healthcare system in Korea?

    4 years ago
    • Hey, I was just recently in hospital here in Korea. I am an EPIK teacher and we have insurance, which covers about half of the cost of procedures. I had an emergency surgery and a two week stay in hospital and my team of surgeons had very good English, as well as the majority of the nurses and ICU staff. It’s helpful to know some Korean as well though! Some facts/differences: you must pay the full amount due before you can be discharged. If you need to sign any papers ( to approve a surgery, get a radioactive liquid scan etc) they might help explain what it says, but there will be no English version so there has to be a level of trust there. Due to the language difference, it can be very hard to get information or answers that satisfy you. You kinda have to wing it at times! In the wards there is a ‘guardianship’ type system. This means that it is expected that you have someone caring for your basic needs and advocating for you if you feel pain or something like that. As foreigners this can be the most difficult aspect of a hospital stay. Be well and good luck!

      4 years ago
    • I know that my sensei says that Japanese doctors tend to write in German so that when some one has a traumatic illness they don’t know till the whole family is consulted maybe its similar to Korean but I have no Idea.

      4 years ago
    • I’m Korean but I’m American. From my experience, it’s pretty alright… Some doctors were nice, some were kinda rude. Maybe I was being a bit too sensitive. I’m not sure about the insurance. My parents had a korean social security number so i just kind of automatically had insurance. I think I went to get an acupuncture treatment once and it costed like 10 dollars. I don’t think doctors speak english very well… This is the best I’ve got since I’m korean and I speak korean too… I hope a foreigner can give you more information…

      4 years ago
  53. i was cocking my finger load up to rail down on this post. but okay.. that’s something i didn’t know.
    i know koreans drive like a maniac, but compare with NY, its not that much of a difference.
    do japan have tipping system like America?
    have you guys been to the where Nukes hit? i heard even Japaneses don’t want to live in there.

    4 years ago
  54. There are many restaurants in Korea specializing in Japanese style sushi and sashimi, some serving excellent dishes even many Japanese admire. I live in Michigan and visited Toronta many times, but find sushi and sashimi in Korea are much better than those offered in Michigan or Toronto. Perhaps you visited only substandard places in Korea, maybe…Also I want to point out that sushi is Japanese, not traditional Korean food. Korean sashimi is aged and prepared differently than Japanese counterpart, in addition to be often eaten wrapped in perilla leaves with soy paste. I prefer Korean sashimi to Japanese any day. So it maybe a matter of personal preference, you can not say Korean sashimi is worse than Japanese. The anago you say “too chewy” is considered a delicacy in Korea and Japan. Maybe you have not acquired its taste yet:you must chew very long and it gets better and better as you chew. very sweet aftertaste. I heard many rumors of people dying from eating too much before going to sleep:it is so delicious.

    4 years ago
  55. There’s a difference between making a racist generalization about a minority group living in another country, and drawing conclusions about a country’s culture from the media that country produces about ITSELF. Not saying that TV is representative of real life, because it’s not, but it definitely is shaped by a country’s culture, i.e. Hollywood vs. Chungmuro. So I think it’s a legitimate question (and I’m curious about the answer too).

    4 years ago
    • This reminds me of when my Korean friend thought all foreigners had no inhibitions about being naked in public because she had seen them naked on TV while protesting animal fur.

      TV as media is a very powerful educational tool.

      4 years ago
  56. Hahah! How punny!

    4 years ago
  57. I have an Alf complete set…

    4 years ago
  58. Hey, I hope you two enjoyed your stay in Japan ^^
    There are a lot of things that I could add, agree or disagree with, but I’ll stick to the restaurant service bit. I’ve been living in Tokyo for more than half a year now I can definitely relate to what you said- when you eat out it does feel a little like you’re doing business rather than enjoying a nice meal… at least at most places. But I recently happened to go on a trip across different parts of Japan and oh, boy. Are Japanese people diverse in their attitudes. This kind of family-like treatment that you spoke about does exist here, especially in places like Kyushu.
    My point is, I think the whole problem is not Japan, but Tokyo in particular. Being the huge, international city that it is, this kind of “coldness” that the people living here seem to project is not surprising. Not just Japanese people, everyone.
    So if you have a chance, try and go visit other parts of the island too, like Fukuoka and Kyoto~ I’m sure you’ll love it. ^^

    4 years ago
  59. I was surprised when you talked about the metro. I found it way easier in Japan. I never got lost there. Can’t say the same about Korea. Maybe that’s because I’m more used to the Japanese Metro? I don’t know. But I agree with the other comparisons. It was interesting

    4 years ago
  60. I lol-ed when i saw the Bleach photo that you inserted XD

    4 years ago
  61. It’s funny to me that you say the Sushi restaurants were all run by Korean people in Canada. Because here, every sushi restaurant is run by Chinese people.

    4 years ago
  62. Neat TLDR. I have to completely agree about Korean run kitchens in sushi places. Of course I prefer them over the Mexican run kitchens where they try sneaking hot sauce into everything.

    4 years ago
  63. maybe card flipper is fighting crime at night and just needs to pay the bills.. fighting crime isn’t lucrative.

    and please tell me this.. .in Protect the Boss, JiHeon wears this business suit with wings and writing airbrushed on his back. this isn’t common is it? or is it just style for a drama? really creative.

    4 years ago
  64. I use to lived in Korea before and now I lived in Japan so I really seen both culture. All of the things you stated are true. I just want to add that I think Korea has more better technology than Japan. Tokyo an major cities have great technology but the other part of Japan is just ehhh… not so good some train station in japan doesn’t accept Pass card or T-money but in Korea every where you can use your T-moey. Alot of store in Japan doesn’t accept credit cards, in Korea even a smile stand accept credit cards… And almost all Korean has fancy phones like the latest one but in japan you will see japanese having those flip ups getto phone.. I love Korea cause it’s so cheap and accessible not like Japan it’s freaking expensive…

    4 years ago
  65. But I think she has a point. Latin American males (read: my husband, cousins, dad, etc.) seem to have this overly masculine ideal of what males should be. The manliest Korean artists still look feminine in the eyes of the men in my life. Crying in public…big NONO.

    Even the difference between Latin America and the US is very visible. So, her question about man being emotional is very legitimate.

    4 years ago
  66. Great TL;DR.

    Just my observation about the Japan vs. Korea english-speaking, and I’ll preface it with “I’ve never been to either”:
    1) Of all the people I know who have gone overseas to teach English (and there are quite a few), none of them have ever gone to Japan. I suspect there may be some, but not many. Whatever their reasons (cost of living? no jobs?), perhaps if Japanese students are predominantly being taught English by non-native speakers of the language, their final abilities are then less.

    2) When I was in university, I had the opportunity to meet both Korean and Japanese exchange student groups through my classes in Asian culture and Japanese language. The Koreans all spoke english fairly well and we had little to no problem understanding each other. The Japanese students could not understand us at all, or us them. In my frustration, for a joke, I tried speaking english with a comically thick Japanese accent (my Japanese was minimal at the time) and problem solved! I was suddenly the “translator” for both groups, the Japanese students now understood me perfectly, even if I still struggled with what they were saying, I now had a rosetta stone of sorts to go on……

    Also, anime/manga was HUGE in France before it even set foot in North America (perhaps because French was the international language still until the 1990s) so I think that there has just probably been more people learning japanese outside of Japan overall than people learning korean outside of Korea. Even today, if I can’t find a manga or anime in english, I’m almost 99% sure I can find it in french. Thank you french immersion ^_^v

    Cyber_3 – watched lots anime on tv in Canada back in the 1970s-80s in french, since that’s all there was…..

    4 years ago
    • Really? Comming from Australia I know heaps of people who taught English in Japan, they have a government sponsored program for that called JET. When I was in Japan there were lots of people with passable english (maybe not enough to hold up a conversation but enough to deal with us). In fact nobody spoke to me in Japanese unless I spoke it to them first. They expect foreigners to know no japanese.

      4 years ago
      • um….er….well, maybe my information is a little out of date, I went to university about…oh my….(counting)… eep! 16 years ago now….. Or maybe they don’t need North Americans to teach english there because they have Australians so close by? Or perhaps the Australian accent makes a difference? As you have travelled there and are so much closer anyhow, I would certainly bow to your greater knowledge on this point.

        When I went to Shanghai for work 5 years ago, I did meet people who could speak english, more commonly than I expected, but I’m pretty sure from the time that I got lost downtown alone that it is not widespread. However, work situations or school situations don’t always reflect what is the norm for the general population so this was all speculation/anecdotal on my part. Thanks for the reply.

        4 years ago
  67. Who needs porn in Korea when you got girl groups and boy groups getting all nasty with each other? :P

    4 years ago
  68. While I have to agree with you about the service in Japan, I’ve come to realize that that’s not always the case. When I was in Fukushima, a group of my friends and I went to a Mom&Pop type udon restaurant. An older couple was working there, and they were so kind and attentive. Some of us simply ordered rice, but they gave us udon for free, because they wanted us to “taste authentic udon”. The older man was particularly sweet, because he kept trying to converse with us despite the language barrier, and we ended up teaching each other a few words. I think it really just depends where you go, much like every place in the world.

    4 years ago
  69. Well, I haven’t been to the countries but I have noticed that Korean exchange students spend more time bowing in general than the Japanese students. Initially, I had though that the bowing portion of the culture was primarily in dramas or at least overemphasized in the dramas. That is, until I saw it in person. I was speaking with a Korean friend when he spotted his seonbae. He stopped talking to me and did a 90 degree bow to the guy. I was informed that it was normal. Also, if you aren’t a native, they have VERY different expectations for you. Most of the Japanese I’ve met could care less about the bowing. The Koreans, on the other hand, are very big on the elder respect thing and if they know you know the proper behavior, they make sure you do it.

    I said all that to say this: Things are likely different in the expectations for foreigners. I’ve never been to the countries so I have no real idea of things there. Only how the exchange students and immigrants behave. Forgive my rambling.

    4 years ago
    • when I read your comment the first time, I read it as “spend more time bowling” and I was like really? they bowl alot? lol

      4 years ago
  70. I lived in Korea for 2 years and visited Japan twice. One of the main differences I noticed was how people moved on sidewalks and down in the subways. In Korea, people walk everywhere with no order. And slowly. And stop randomly in front of you to check their phones. It was entirely frustrating to try and get somewhere, either in our small city or in the bigger cities like Seoul. Also, lines mean nothing in Korea. People might form a line while waiting for the bus or subway, but as soon as the bus/train arrives, the line is abandoned and it’s every person for themselves. But when we went to Japan, we saw that people walked on the left side of the sidewalk and moved to the side if they had to stop, much like cars. And people actually stood in lines to get on the subway. In both Toyko and Seoul, there are so many people, but we found it much easier to move around in Tokyo.

    Also, we found that cell phone (mobile, hand phone) manners in Tokyo were much better than in Korea. In Tokyo, you are not allowed to talk or make any noise on your phone while riding the subway or in many restaurants. That’s quite the opposite in Korea, where we found that people (teens) would often blare their music or watch tv or games on their phones with full sound. Also, older folks tended to talk loudly as well, but they are old so they are allowed.

    But Korea takes the cake for being affordable place in which to live and travel! We took a five minute taxi ride in Fukuoka and it must have cost us $10 – in Korea and in our small city, that would barely break the minimum payment of $2. Hotels and food in Tokyo are quite pricey, but you can easily find a cheap hotel for $30 and a meal for $5 in Seoul. The train was also quite expensive in Toyko – I don’t remember how much it cost to go from Tokyo to Mt Fuji, but I know that to travel across Korea from Seoul to Busan on the high speed train is $50. You can’t even get from Toronto to Kingston, ON with $50!

    Also, Seoul has the best subway system we’ve ever taken. Now we are back in Ontario and when we visit Toronto, we are always saddened by the lack of service, the expense, and how they are just starting to introduce a card system and people are all upset about that!

    Seriously, Seoul – you rock. And Tokyo too. But Korea, I miss you!

    4 years ago
    • I completely agree about the chaos on sidewalks in Seoul. It was frustrating that people were always in the way and often were completely oblivious to it – even in the train stations when changing lines. Most of the time it was a couple holding hands walking slow as molassses on a tiny street) so I definitely relate to what you are talking about.

      4 years ago
  71. And that’s what i call sexism in Mexico, Is like saying that girl should only play dress up and boys should play with action toys and whatnot. For(us) mexicans men don’t tend to cry, but that does not mean there aren’t any boys that do cry, Same goes for korean people, there might be people who cry alot, and there might be those who don’t. You can’t generalize just by looking at dramas. Cause if that were the case with us mexicans, we might as well have a freakin ¨telenovela¨ as our lifes.

    4 years ago
  72. thisll probably get lost in the shuffle since this is such a good tldr but im considering moving up from my entry level sony dslr into the canon and i notice you guys have a wonderfully selected pair of lenses, the 50mm prime and the wide tokina(oh how i lust for this!), and they seem to fit everything you do, plus some extra pretty videos youve done, i really wish you could do a tldr on camera-relatedness, especially since you said you had no experience editing before, based on that its very professional kit youv chosen, anything interesting you want to say about how you chose your gear, how you use them, etcetc
    :)

    4 years ago
  73. Hello! I’ve been a huge fan of Japan longer than for Korea, but right now I like them both a lot! Even though I hadn’t had the chance to visit them… YET!xD

    These differences are new to me… I really learned something from you guys today! yay!:)
    Btw I thought that you would have said something that you said before in your vlog of your Japan trip… I was waiting the whole video for it!^^ How about what you said before about how you saw a lot of people eating alone in Japan whereas in Korea, people barely ever eat alone!!!:P haha! bet you forgot about that! hehe~

    4 years ago
  74. I’m in California and have been trying to learn korean – and I got enough in me to know if someone is speaking korean (thought not 100% what they are saying). I’ve been to a few pho houses here and realized all the staff spoke korean, whatt???? Maybe they dig the restaurant biz.

    4 years ago
  75. My husband and I are planning on having our late honeymoon in Japan (Tokyo and Kyoto >.<). Coz we didn't have one after the wedding a few months ago lol
    So this kinda helped (will have to remember to steer away from train stations ;P). And if the taxis are cheap, my hubby will LOVE it haha he hates using buses and trains.
    I soooo want to try out different Japanese foods. Coz I've never been really impressed by any of the Japanese restaurants I've been to in the Philippines and here in Seattle. I watched your video when you guys were still in Japan and the sushi and ramen just made me crave GOOD sushi and ramen LOL

    Ohh, I will have to cover his eyes from pornos everywhere ;P

    Thanks for this vid! You guys are awesome! XD

    4 years ago
  76. DVD/CD is going away because we’ve the internet now, and who wants to rent DVD and wait for it to come out versus just go on the internet. This is why more company is going network world.

    Both have their similarity, and that is emotion. Both like to keep it inside, and just use like a certain kind of manner which I find really hard to understand. In Korea, you cannot outspoken your elder in any way, and do not say something bad about someone else even friends. In Tokyo, Japan, it’s like a cold place with little to no emotion. They follow a really tradition aspect. This is unless they adapt to the western culture which there is still some that need to be hide.
    *This emotion thing make me hard to express myself, it’s like I’m boiling up, but cannot do nothing about it. It’s worst if you’re the youngest -_-*

    Both have their pros/cons, but I still love Japan&Korea Manga/manhwa, and Korean drama ^^

    4 years ago
  77. I totally agree. I think it is so weird when I was in Japan airport, I exist the gate, and I was about to get my baggage check then all of a sudden the guy gave me another shoe and ‘bow’ to me. I was like um… O_O and I just bow since he bowed lol

    In Korea, you bow to your elder, and in a respect manner actually, so it’s not like a bow daily thing.

    4 years ago
  78. I’ve never been to either of those countries, but what I heard from my friends (Japanese major btw) was that many Japanese people responded to even the most polite and gramatically correct Japanese questions with their Engrish…or just ignored them.
    An author of a book I recently read had similar experiences in Japan too (and she’s not from an English-speaking country)…
    So it’s probably a bit of a chance..
    I don’t know, I really want to see for myself (hopefully soon ;) )
    XOXO

    4 years ago
  79. If you guys ever go back to Akihabara there is a great soba place near by that you should check out. It has a great Old Tokyo feel to it and the food is amazing! http://tokyofood.blog128.fc2.com/blog-entry-17.html

    4 years ago
  80. Well I can’t give my opinion on differences because I have never been to either places but I would love to go to both countries some day :) this was an awesome TLDR, you guys handled it professionally AND honestly! I really respect you guys and I REALLY love watching your videos… you guys are just awesome!!! thank you for making videos!!

    4 years ago
  81. I love this topic, but I also hate it because it often leads to many people going “japan is better’ “No Korea is better” and its like, let’s all take a deep breath and really analyze what is being said. No one mentioned which country is superior, we are just pointing out the differences. Every country has differences. I realize it’s a sensitive topic because Japan and Korea had that history and many Koreans would love it if Korea had “better differences” mentioned. Right now I’m afraid to even venture into the youtube comments area (which is why I watched this video through your blog). Much more civil and hopefully less immature fans here (regardless of your age). Thanks for this topic though, I always wanted to know what some of the differences are (i totally agree with you about the driving thing though. I’m going to Korea in the near future and I had wanted to drive around the country since apparently my american drivers license can be used, but I’m afraid of the irresponsible crazy ass drivers in Korea)

    4 years ago
  82. The koreans you met in Japan probably belong to the zainichi koreans which came to Japan between 1910 and 1945. Most of them refuse to take the Japanese nationality because they have to give up their Korean name and to take a Japanese name. That is probably the most pressing issue in the zainichi community besides discrimination by the Japanese societey (although they are Japanese as well).A Korean friend who belongs to that zainichi community told me that the zainichi are not very welcome in Korea either, so that could be a reason for Koreans in Korea lacking japanese sushi skills ;)

    4 years ago
    • well … I think it’s simply due to the different in taste. If there was a need of japanese sushi in Korea, it would have come no matter what. Where there are buyers, sellers come ;)

      4 years ago
  83. ‘Like’ for the porn music at 6:00. Mmmm….sooo sesual! :-D

    4 years ago
  84. From what I understand with the language of inter-racial couples, Japan is VERY focused on being a homogeneous society and take great pride in that (they RARELY grant foreigners citizenship regardless of how long they’ve been there). Therefore, inter-racial relationships aren’t looked upon the best so I’m assuming that by with both of the people speaking Japanese, whoever the foreigner is is showing that respect and understanding of the culture by being able to speak the language.

    4 years ago
  85. I’m surprised that not a lot of foreigners spoke Japanese. I had the same opinion you guys did. Maybe they do it more at work rather than on the streets? That’s super interesting though.
    As to why there is more diversity in Japan, I could be totally wrong but I think Japan is more inviting. Inviting in the sense that there area lot more job opportunities and I think I read in the comments below that there about the anime/manga industry which a lot of people are into all over the world. Plus, Japan is popular for tourists. I don’t know, but I’ve always wondered about the diversity differences between Japan and S. Korea.

    4 years ago
  86. Nic

    Soooo many sushi places in Australia are run by Koreans, like I’d say the majority are. It’s almost a sure thing that when you go buy sushi the employees will all be speaking Korean. So sushi made by Koreans is pretty good here but I’ve never had sushi in Korea AND my (Korean) husband said he has never actually eaten sushi while in Korea. Weird.

    One thought on the language thing and about interracial couples speaking Japanese. Here at least, it’s a lot easier to learn Japanese and is taught in schools. For example, my brother who has been living in Japan, started learning Japanese in school when he was about 13. So by the time he moved to Japan when he was 19, he already had a good understanding of the language and then after a few years managed to reach fluency. I know lots of people who have some level of Japanese because many people study it at school.

    For me on the other hand, I had no knowledge of Korean until I made Korean friends in my mid 20’s and now though I’m married to a Korean man, I’m struggling learning Korean as an adult. Even now with Australia doing major trading with South Korea, Korean has not been put on school syllabuses. There is a big push for Asian languages in schools now so Australian school students can learn Mandarin and Japanese but for some reason there is no push for Korean. So that might play into the interracial couples speaking Japanese, the non-Japanese person in the couple may have already been exposed to Japanese, giving them that jump into learning and being able to speak it with their Japanese partner.

    4 years ago
    • It might also be that Korea as a country is just blooming in terms of their culture being known in other countries. I’ve noticed that how much people know about a country has to do with the country’s economic influence. Hence why everyone has a good idea of American stuff or British stuff. And Japan made a big leap back in the eighties, so by now schools already have programs for the Japanese languages and pretty much everyone and their pastor knows what kawaii means. My university has a language centre, and they teach over 20 languages, but the ones that got more students are English, French, German, Japanese, Chinese and Arabic. Clearly the pattern is there. South Korea was in a really bad situation back in the eighties, and now they are so well of in no time at all programs will be implemented to learn Korean.

      4 years ago
  87. I’m visiting tokyo this june with my family and we plan to take the subway throughout the trip. But i’m VERY worried about how crowded the trains will be. Is it really like how it is on tv/online where it is SUPER packed and crowded where everyone is just smashed together like sardines. I have this weird phobia (don’t judge me) of being in crowded places where everyone is kind of “touching” each other. Especially in trains and shops.

    4 years ago
    • I don’t think its a weird phobia. I have a friend who hates crowds too, they make him really uncomfortable.
      Like most public transport in any big city around the world, there will be times when its really busy and it will be super packed, but there are also times when you will be able to sit down and have ample room to yourself
      Just consider when you are going to use the subway. During the peak times, like just before and straight after working hours are most likely to be the busiest times, so I’d avoid using it then. Other times of the day you shouldn’t have too much trouble.
      You can also do things like when you are waiting for a train, move to an area that doesn’t have a lot of people waiting. If you walk a little bit further away from the main entrances less people will be waiting there and less people will get into that section of the train. So its possible to avoid the bigger crowds.
      When we went to Japan we didn’t have many problems. Yes there were a couple of times when it was really busy, but we just waited for the next train and it was quieter. Don’t worry about it too much. I hope you enjoy your trip~ :)

      4 years ago
  88. How’s Korean animation? Are there any Korean cartoon shows (not kiddy shows) for teenagers/or older? Or is it all just for the little ones. (I also know that Korea does help a lot with making USA animation.)

    4 years ago
  89. I kinda understand the locked down wifi for Japan. I’m studying computer security and having your wifi free and available can be dangerous. If you don’t set your wifi right, people can do some damage to computers and cause some serious problems. I just hope that Korea is setting up separate wifis for personal use and public use.

    4 years ago
  90. Hello! First I really love this blog! So thank you that you do this! :D
    I’m living in Japan for 6 month as student, and in the spring vacation I could go to Korea for 3 weeks, too. The first and the most important difference was the people. In Japan nobody is rude, nobody make fight, or something else. In Korea they do. I think korean people are more lively. And friendly. Japanese are very kind to you, for the first time. Then, when you want to make friends for example, they pretend as they don’t know you. Everytime. I think Japanese can’t speak out their feelings, korean can a bit more. But this is just my oppinion. :D

    4 years ago
  91. How’s Korean animation? Are there any Korean cartoon shows (not kiddy shows) like do they have any cartoons shows for teenagers? Or is it all just for the little ones. (I also know that Korea does help a ton of USA animation.)

    4 years ago
  92. Moe

    While I haven’t visited Korea yet, I studied down in Fukuoka, Japan for 5 months. I’m thinking it might have just been the Tokyo area, because every restaurant I went to was super nice and friendly and very homey, particularly this one small mom-and-pop ramen shop that made the best food ever.

    4 years ago
  93. I think Japan in the smaller cities is waaay different. Japan’s advertising is a little annoying too, because they hand out little tissues with their info on it, but you can always just refuse them. I used to do that because I would have a bagillion if I took them all!

    I would definitely say it is more cold though in general… I noticed in Japan people were just more to themselves and they are very shy to speak English so they don’t interact with foreigners most of the time. When I went to Korea though, everyone stared and tried to talk to me! It was kind of a culture shock after being in Japan for so long. At one point I literally thought I could be invisible in Japan because no one ever paid attention to me! It has its pros and cons, but it can be lonely.

    Porn culture is definitely apparent in Japan… I remember the first time I went into a convenience store and saw men browsing through porno magazines in plain site! So embarrassing!

    Of course, the Japanese subway is so expensive. I never used transport there and chose to ride my bike instead. I took a taxi once with my coworkers and it was expensive. It was the same as a Korean taxi basically. The Japanese trains are old, but they are always on time and really reliable. The Korean subway is cheap but I think they were rarely on time when I rode on it… it has trade offs I guess. The price for Japanese transport is crazyyyy though!

    I have no idea what you are talking about for the vegetables. My school fed me and I always ate tons!! I miss the food so much. :D

    4 years ago
    • Hmmm, maybe in Tokyo they are a little cold? But actually I feel the exact opposite I just went to Korea and I felt everyone was so cold to me: on the subway and even walking, people wouldn’t look at me or even talk to me, just glare if maybe they wanted me to move over or something. Even buying things in the store, they never really said “hello” or replied to my “thank you”. In Japan, they always welcome you to the store really excitedly and on the street will stop and apologize if they knock into you. And many people, young and old, practice talking to me in English or even in Japanese. But I think maybe it just depends on the time and place for both countries.

      4 years ago
  94. Love Simon’s tie today (and the TLDR obviously!).

    4 years ago
  95. I love Sweden .. Anyone? :(

    4 years ago
  96. I’ve never been to Korea, but as for speaking the native language, a part of it is probably that it’s a lot harder to learn. I’m in college now, and majoring in Japanese, but I wanted to start learning Korean as well. My school is probably 5-10% Korean, which is a rather large percentage, but they don’t offer the language. Or history classes. The library section is bare. For Japanese, they have an entire department with history courses and culture courses as well as language coursese, and I think there’s less than 1% Japanese students. It’s impossible to find someone to teach Korean, and relatively easy to learn Japanese.

    4 years ago
    • CD

      if there are Korean students in your school who knows Korean, you can ask them to do an exchange language program with them. Go to a site that have lessons on learning Korean and both of you can learn Korean and English together. My School started to have Korean studies, probably in the last decade or so and it seems popular. You might be able to make a club out of it or something to find like minded individuals and form your own group to learn Korean together and just ask locally if possible for someone who speaks Korean and have time to teach you guys.

      4 years ago
  97. The reason you guys probably had better treatment in Seoul vs. Tokyo is that there are less foreigners in Seoul – so they are much more surprised to see you – Tokyo has been pretty crowded with foreigners for a long time and from all over so it isn’t really a rare thing. I experienced “service-su” :) in Korea of course at several restaurant with the free banchan and sometimes soda. In Japan, my equivalent was at arcades – when I would play arcade games the attendants would often give me service and pushed the stuffed animal or prize to the end of the crane machine to help me tip it over =].

    Another major difference is the subway. In Seoul, you pay considerably less to travel, but in Tokyo you pay every time you change lines and it’s very expensive in comparison to the subway in Seoul and I thought the subway in Tokyo (if you’re not on the JR Line) is actually less foreigner friendly than the one in Seoul that has TVs and sound systems notifying you in a bunch of languages if you’re approaching your stop.

    It was my experience that Japanese people in Tokyo were more willing to help direct a foreigner than those in Seoul – I’m not sure why that was – but anytime I was lost in Tokyo I could walk up to almost anyone and ask for directions. Another thing with that is that people in Korea would tend to make alot of eye contact with me when I was on the subway (I’m Hispanic) and many times I was asked what exactly I was doing in Seoul. In Tokyo, everyone would avoid eye contact and if they did make it they would immediately apologize and bow (because it’s really quite rude imo), although I did get used to the staring in Seoul and just started to look up at the ceiling when on the Subway.

    I think the food in convenience stores in Tokyo are pretty superior to those in GS-25s or Family Marts in Korea. I had this amazing spaghetti out of a 7-11 and it was better than the Italian restaurants I had tasted out in Seoul. Tokyo has a better grasp of foreign cuisine than Seoul and I feel that might have to do with the amount of time Tokyo has had exposure to foreigners and how many have lived there to influence the food.

    Def. don’t get in a Taxi lol it’s so expensive. You’re better waiting it out in Tokyo for sunrise and the subways – in Korea I would regularly just hitch a cab home though after a night out on the town. Not so in Tokyo.

    Arcades are also a difference. Obviously there is Akihabara in Tokyo and Japan is where most video games come from, but really Japan has a ton of arcades in comparison to Seouls PlayStation-bangs or Wii-bangs which really only have FIFA and fighting games/shooters in them. In Tokyo, you can play the older most retro video games and I loved that!

    Autumn also seems to last longer in Tokyo (maybe because it’s an island?). I went to Tokyo in December 2011 and still saw autumn leaves and cold but temperate weather, while I was literally freezing my butt off in Korea and all the trees and plants were long dead.

    That’s all for now :)

    4 years ago
  98. i love Korea and Japan!! my 2 fave countries!!! (that i’ve never been to T_T, but i will one day!!)
    Korea!!! you better recycle all those flyers!!!
    wifi heaven is a place where i need to live!!
    oohhh!!! Simon you so nasty!!!
    haha again!!!! you mention SHINee….you sing Juliette!! hahahaha!!

    4 years ago
  99. I love japanese street advertising ^^ Of course there’re people who try to give you just some flyers, but when it gets colder almost everyone gives you tissiues with flyers in the package :) I never buy tissues here ^^

    4 years ago
  100. It’s interesting that you point out that interracial couples speak Japanese in Japan and English in Korea, I was unaware of this but it doesn’t surprise me. Having lived in Japan, English is rarely spoken at all and if you have lived there long enough to have a significant other you are expected to speak some Japanese by that point (actually it is more of a necessity than an expectation).

    I imagine there are more foreigners in Tokyo, but in Osaka where I lived I almost NEVER saw another non-Asian person if I wasn’t in my university international building and it wasn’t even until my final months there that the train lines had stop announcements in English. I also rarely saw interracial couples. So basically, in Japan people speak Japanese.

    4 years ago
  101. I think the bigger amount of foreigners could perhaps partly be explaned through the worldwide popularity of manga and anime. A lot of fans become interested in the country as well and eventually visit it. Korea hasn’t such a “export hit” (not that I know of).

    4 years ago
    • Yeah, I know what you mean. I didn’t know about Korean Dramas or Kpop until I stumbled upon Korean Dramas when I couldn’t find any anime shows I wanted to watch and even then I thought they were Japanese and really didn’t want to watch them. I only learned about Kpop from Eat Your Kimchi when I was searching for something about Korean Drama or Korean Musicians and stumbled across EYK’s Dance Kpop 2008…I think (I didn’t actually watch it until 2011, when I first found out about Kpop)…it was the one with G-Dragon’s “Heartbreaker” and one with SHINee. So there you have it….stumble upon K-Drama and Kpop from an anime site (CR) and a couple visiting South Korea. :P

      4 years ago
    • Korean Dramas? K-Pop? :D

      4 years ago
      • I think k-pop is more of a recent thing, people have been talking about japan since i was really young, because of the mangas and famous games from there. Korea is more of a new topic im hearing, cuz of k-pop mostly i think. Maybe 3 years ago i started hearing people mention it more?..maybe more i forget xP yeah that’s just my area though *canada gta*

        4 years ago
      • Yeah, but isn’t that really recent though? Not the actual dramas and music, of course, but the wave of interest in other parts of the world. It’s just that ever since I was little I was watching Japanese cartoons, but I had never really saw that same level of easy exposure to Korean entertainment. I think Korea’s big wave may still in the making or rather in its first stages, but I think it could definitely be really big too.

        Edit: Oops, sorry. Didn’t refresh and see the other comments. :p

        4 years ago
      • as it is, hallyu is still very much an underground sporadic thing outside of asia, youd think from watching news about the concerts kpop stars are doing that its huge but its really not, fans are passionate but few and far between, its nothing compared to the impact manga and anime had/still has in america europe etc

        4 years ago
  102. On the porn issue, I agree that porn is more accessible in Japan. Their sex culture is very obvious. I am used to seeing older Japanese men on trains or buses looking at their Hentai porn.. and eyes glued to their phones one by one in a row… I also like to make a point on the role of the Korean government issuing laws against mini skirts and disabling porn sites.. When i grew up in the early 2000’s..Korea was a bit more conservative, but it seemed over night the Korean girls on music videos became very sulty like they were studying BET like no other..On the issue of governemnt intervention..I don’t think it’s a bad idea..however I can see how American’s would feel pissed about losing their civil liberty-freedom to expression and expression of sexuality. I think this is a hot topic! I hope to hear more about it in myriad of ways in discussion.

    4 years ago
  103. You CAN find DVDs in stores if you look hard enough. Last trip I got several box sets of old series I couldn’t find online. BUT I get the sense that most Koreans order everything online or watch stuff on their phones or download stuff so the old school video/dvd rental places are all dying.

    4 years ago
  104. I agree–totally wish there were some DVD rental places here in Korea! p.s. I love my kimbap chunguk ajjumas! They used to always fawn over my braids/hairbows/etc, but lately they’ve been oogling over my husbands curly red hair. haha. Just like the old ladies back in the US did!

    4 years ago
  105. I like Korean sashimi, raw squid, and sea squirts..dipped in gochu-jang. I really like the ones from the Haenyo from Jeju Island..
    Korea has come a long way folks…
    I grew up in S.Korea in the early 90’s and moved to Japan mid 90’s and now that I visit back in 2012 ..i’m blown away. I’m proud of Korea!!! (South)

    4 years ago
  106. This is amazing i want to visit both places!. free wifi and the fastest internet in the world , my gamers heaven !

    4 years ago
  107. The advertising in Japan can get a bit annoying as well! In the main streets people will stand outside their shops or at busy crossroads with packets of tissues that have flyers inside. So by the end of the day you’ll have accumulated about 10 packets of tissues (which are useless as well cos they are so thin!!) Or they’ll stand there and shout out promotions and walk around with huuuge signs advertising it! I guess it’s better than the flyers thrown on the floor though :P

    4 years ago
  108. Boy, I would love free wifi in Toronto… but like that’ll ever happen LOL ;___;
    When I went to Osaka, Japan a few years ago with my family, it was hilarious when we got lost because my dad, who knew VERY little Japanese, tried asking for direction but as soon as the Japanese peeps heard English or noticed that he was a foreigner, they dipped lol it was funny but at the same time, we were still lost xD

    I had the same confusion with the public transportation… “Fine, I guess I’m lost in Osaka forever” lol

    4 years ago
    • I’m living in Osaka right now and I have to say, that never happened to me. Every time I get lost, even if they don’t speak English, we use body language and they always get so worried that they actually take me to where I am trying to get to. Or they lend me their phone/look up info for me on their phone. The times I tried asking for directions in Korea (in English), they all looked at me with a “Oh God, I don’t speak English” look on their face and took off. Or kinda grunted something in Korea and pointed vaguely in a direction. But I guess everyone has different experiences.

      4 years ago
  109. I think if you travel outside of Tokyo you’ll experience more of the kind/caring ahjumma type you mention in your restaurant section. In my experience people in Tokyo are kind of cold lol.

    4 years ago
    • I was a foreigner (asian but still foreign) so some people did stop to help me around and i agree that it just comes with the metropolitan factor. Still loved Japan though; the people, food, and everything in general was great.

      4 years ago
    • I’ve never been to Korea but I have been to Japan a few times and from my experience I saw that people are nice and polite when you ask for assistance or help but very rarely do people come approach you. When I was in Kyoto we wanted to go to the Kyoto manga museum and we were lost. A number of people walked by us and recognized (at least I think they did) that we were lost but didn’t approach us. However, the two people that we approached and asked were both really nice. The latter even went out of her way and took us to the museum that was a couple of blocks away. We’ve also gotten lost in Tokyo in a really crowded place and a lot of people passed us and knew that we were lost but again no one approached us. However, when we asked for help the person tried his best to explain and was very helpful. I find that to be a general trend in Japan. One time we were on the train and this young girl but toilet paper in her dress and I believed a lot of people noticed but no one (including us) went up and remind the girl until like half an hour later and this lady did so only as she was getting off the train. I wanted to tell the girl or her mom but my mom stopped me because she wasn’t sure how the mom would react. I discussed this with my mom and we came up with the hypothesis and the Japanese people didn’t want to be impolite and that they probably thought the mom should have noticed. I don’t know if that is true but that was just what we came up with.

      It seems that Japanese people are polite and helpful when you approach them first.

      4 years ago
    • I think it’s basically just Tokyo where you’ll have the slightly colder experience. Tokyo’s used to absorbing a ton of people and cultures, and so it’s sort of its own entity. Outside of Tokyo, you get a lot better service. I’ve been studying here in Akita since August and I’ve met some really kind ahjumma types. It probably helps that there are many more elderly people here while all of the youth move to Tokyo to work in corporations and such.

      4 years ago
    • Yeah I experienced kind Japanese people who helped me when I was lost and I had less caring service in Korea. The experience is different, each restaurant is different. If you go to the countryside in Japan like Fukushima (if it’s better from the devastating event last year) the people are nice and a lot of families grow their own garden of veggies and fruits. My host family was in the countryside and I went pumpkin picking with my sofu (grandfather). The community were a lovely and lively bunch.

      4 years ago
    • I found people in Japan to be super helpful and friendly everywhere, seriously I’ve never seen a culture that’s this friendly before. Everyone went out of their way to assist in any way that they could. I spoke only Japanese though (basic) so I’m not sure if the experience is different for other people. I found people in Tokyo to be very friendly, the only people that were a little less friendly (and this still means very friendly because it’s Japan) were the people in Oosaka. Oosaka, why must you do everything differently! Like suddenly we had to stand on the other side of escalators, every other city in Japan was on the other side. But I’ve heard people say the exact opposite about the people in Oosaka too, so it might just be our experience.

      4 years ago
      • Osaka prides itself on being different than Tokyo. They have different habits, different humor and I swear Osaka ben is practically a different language. I would equate it to being on par with Texas and the rest of the United States.

        4 years ago
    • yes, right. After tokyo , I visited Osaka and Kyoto. It was a lot different. Kansai region people are a lot friendly than the ones in Tokyo.

      4 years ago
  110. Dvds in American seems to be heading down the same path as Korea. I live in a small time surrounded by cows, but we still had a movie rental store in our town when i was growing up. In fact by the time I was in High School we had 2. Now we have none, though we do have a red box machine in our grocery store. Blockbusters are also closing down all around us. Now I don’t know if it’s because of Netflix that we see these going away. I mean I can still find DVDs, but even music stores that carried CDs and DVDs are closing down.

    As for your Taxi remark I have a question for you. I’ve never been to Korea, though I would love to be there, but a friend of mine had a son who lived in Korea because he was in the military. He told me that even though they are cheap if you don’t give the exact amount they won’t give you change. He told me that his son’s wife one time (who is from the Philippines) gave twice as much as she didn’t have anything smaller and was crying to her husband because he refused to give her change. He also told me that his son had a hard time getting a taxi to take them if they had a debit card. They wanted cash because they figured you wouldn’t have exact change. Can you confirm or deny this? Do you know if this only happens to foreigners if you do notice that?

    4 years ago
    • I live in a college town, pop 35,000 ish and we had blockbuster for a short time when I was younger but we had a hometown you know family owned and run video rental place that went out of buisness arround the time of netflix and redbox. I miss them. The only way to rent a movie in town is to go to redbox or rent it online through blockbuster or amazon.

      4 years ago
  111. lol, so living in Korea is probably a lot better than living in Japan.. ;D

    4 years ago
    • As Simon and Martina said, its not about being better. I think though it really depends on your situation, what you’re used to, what you’re willing to get used to, and what you prefer. Some may like it better than Korea, others might like it better in Japan. It really depends on what you want. For them, they lived in Korea for so long, they prefer Korea. Just as my father lived in America for so long that he thinks he won’t be able to live in Korea again (traffic is terrible, etc).

      4 years ago
  112. D’aww.. at first I was first.. then I refreshed and I wasn’t.. sad day is sad.

    4 years ago
  113. COOL TLDR – Could you tell us what you know about saesang fans in Korea and whether or not the Korean media mentions them, maybe even with anti fans? XD

    4 years ago
    • Agree with you. Its not like S&M are knowledgeable about saesang bc they don’t stalk the idols with the crazy fangirls. Unless they do a WANK outside celebs’ houses and get run over by crazy fan girls.

      4 years ago
    • Get used 2 it because music is sort of a common ground for any culture/race/etc. Kinda brings ppl 2gether.

      4 years ago
      • and that’s not what I implied, did I? I’m a kpop fan myself but you have music mondays and plently of other kpop related videos made by them. Simon and Martina probably know about sasaeng fans as much as the average kpop fan does. There’s only the tldr where they can discuss other issues regarding korea and not just kpopkpopkpopkpop. I personally started watching their videos for the tldrs after all. (There’s not that many decent youtubers who vlog/discuss about korea-related issues either)

        4 years ago
    • yes, you can even find a subbed korean documentary on youtube abou that topic (very interesting!!)
      just type in “saesang fans” and you´ll find it, it´s quite a long video, splitted into 2 parts.

      4 years ago
    • I’d like them to cover Korean fans and ‘netizens’ in general. They seem to have a lot more pull and power over K-Pop idols, musicians and actors than in the west and even in Japan. I wonder why that is. I mean we have haters in western pop but they’re not nearly as vehement as Anti-Fans and Saesangs.

      4 years ago
    • lol would you rather that they didn’t answer the question at all?

      4 years ago
    • Can’t imagine how S&M can talk about this since its not like they have saesang fans.

      4 years ago
    • I’d love S&M to cover this topic, and to discuss stalker laws in general

      4 years ago
  114. Hey I’m from Toronto! Just curious, what sushi places do you go to when you’re here?

    4 years ago
  115. How can you buy k-dramas if there aren’t dvd shops?! Tragic.

    4 years ago
    • I think you need a different verb than “buy” WINK WINK NUDGE NUDGE I MEAN DOWNLOAD! Oh God! Did I just write that? No! No I don’t endorse that kind of behaviour!

      4 years ago