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Korean Cold Medicine

September 11, 2008

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We mentioned in yesterday’s post that Simon was beginning to show the signs of a cold on Saturday during Bucheon’s High School Festival. By Wednesday the cold was full-blown, and he called in sick for the day. Ever the opportunists, we thought that this situation was perfect for a video. No, we’re not going to show you Simon coughing and whimpering. What we decided to make a video about instead was for Korean Cold Medicine. Indeed, the medicine isn’t the same in Bucheon as it is in Canada. In Canada, we’d be eating a warm bowl of Chicken Noodle Soup; in Bucheon, we have to order a big serving of the closest equivalent: Chicken and Ginseng Juk, which is – instead of a noodle soup – a rice soup. It’s really quite delicious, and – from what we’ve seen here in Bucheon – there are many, many Juk restaurants for you to choose from. The one we went to was at the first floor of our building, so we didn’t have to walk far at all to get it. And – just to let you know how many of these restaurants there are – if the one we went to was closed there’s another Juk restaurant two minutes away. If you want Juk in Bucheon, you don’t have to go far.

There’s one more thing in this video worth mentioning; medicine in Korea here is pretty cheap. If you were worried about the cost of living in Korea from our previous post, then you might feel a little more at ease when you consider the price of medicine. Essentially, a pack of ten pills runs you 2000 won, which is roughly two bucks. Two bucks! Try buying 24 hour Claritin for two bucks in Canada! Ha! Of course, some of you may ask how we got the medicine to begin with, since we don’t speak Korean. Simply enough, we wrote down the medical ingredients and showed it to the pharmacist, who had enough English on her to understand what we needed; antihistamines, antitussants, and pseudoephedrine. As well, we know that extra-strength Sudafed offered 120 mg per pill, and these pills offered 120 mg of whatever she interpreted as pseudoephedrine as well. Long story short, if you plan on moving to Bucheon or Korea and are worried about getting stuck without medicine come cold and flu season, simply remember (or write down) the medical ingredients of the medicine you’re used to, and the pharmacists here should be able to read enough English to not only find the medicine but also sell it to you for dirt-cheap prices.

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