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Korean Skin Care and Skin Whitening

May 22, 2014

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So, after we filmed our TL;DR, we were curious about something. In Korea, people protect themselves from the sun. I wonder if their skin cancer rates are lower as a result. We asked Soo Zee to look into this, and here’s what she found:

Skin Cancer in Korea

That’s the list of the most common cancers in four countries. Korea, then Japan, then the US, then the UK. Skin cancer isn’t in the top ten in either Korea or Japan, but 5th and 4th in the US and UK, respectively. Coincidence?

Anyhow, speaking of skin cancer, we mentioned in our video a bit about mole removal and how we got some of ours removed. You might remember, if you’ve been around for a while, how we had bandaids on our faces for a bit. I actually tried looking for those videos but they’re so old that I can’t remember. High five to anyone who does!

Point is, we didn’t remove them for cosmetic purposes, but because we noticed that they were looking a bit irregular, and we know that can lead to health complications in the future. I also had one on my chin, and at least five times a month, I’d cut it open while shaving. So, we went to a dermatologist to get some of them removed. Quick, easy, painless, and TEN BUCKS! That’s it! It was ten bucks a mole. And we didn’t need an appointment or anything. Just walked in to a place we were told about and got it done.

Then again, procedures in Korea are pretty cheap compared to procedures elsewhere, probably because there are dermatologists and clinics just about everywhere. Hell, across the street from us, where all the chicken shops are located, there’s a dermatology shop on the third floor. Great location! Feel like chicken? How about stopping by for some laser hair removal first? Great plan!

Anyhow, let us know what skin care is like where you’re from. Are we wrong in thinking that people take better care of their skin here in Korea than in North America? Do you wear sunblock on your face every day? How cautious are your friends about sun damage? We’d love to hear if it’s just a Korea thing!

Oh! One last thing we forgot to mention: a really cheap and easy way that Koreans take care of their skin so they can stay looking young and beautiful is – how could I have forgotten to mention this? – by clicking on the subscribe button below. Oh man! It’s so good for your health!

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Korean Skin Care and Skin Whitening

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  1. I’m originally from the Philippines, and obviously, as a part of Asia, we’re also big on pale, milky skin. Each time I go to visit, my mom, who is naturally light-skinned, complains because she has such a difficult time finding moisturizers and such that don’t include whitening purposes. But meanwhile, one of her younger sisters has a bunch of moisturizers like collagen and whitening things that she uses (and I noticed it works…).

    When we’re there, I constantly see commercials about the whitening Dove soap or whatever. I’ll admit, I’m one of those people that wants pale skin. I always wear sunblock (not as much in the winter, but I pour it on during the summer!) and I try to avoid the sun as much as I possibly can. I’ve tried some of the products from the Philippines that claim to whiten your skin (didn’t work, except one, which was Silka). I would’ve kept going, but I have sensitive skin so now I use only soap to wash my face, and a Clean & Clear acne wash that I’ve been using since middle school.

    Meanwhile, since I live in the US and tanning is a big thing here, no one else really gets why I want to wear sunblock. While I practically cover myself up to protect my skin from damage, the girls at my school are going to the beach to tan, and some of them literally get major sunburns on purpose just so it “turns into a tan”.

    And also, in the Philippines it’s like socially accepted to be using an umbrella during a regular sunny day, since people don’t want to get darker and because it’s hot and the umbrella obviously provides shade. But I hate that here in the US, if you’re using an umbrella to protect yourself from the burning sun, people judge you so hard (at least in my experience).

    2 years ago
  2. Tell me about it… I’m also Polish and when I say that I don’t want to tan ‘cos it’s not healthy my friends and family say that I’m weird and I need to go outside more so my skin won’t be so white…
    Once a stranger asked me if I had albinism… I have brown hair and oh come on I’m not that white to mistake me for an albino.

    2 years ago
  3. Up here in Maine in the summer, there’s farmers tans all around. If you’re smart and keep yourself covered up, people will say that you glow or that you’re too gosh darn white! And you’re the subject of jealousy if you have a tan before everyone else. Although I see websites saying that you should put sunscreen on everyday, I just don’t bother. I’m outside whenever possible and have a pretty mean tan that is now going to disappear over the long droll winter……aaaaand now i realize why i’ve got so many freckles. And a dermatologist? Never been to one before.

    2 years ago
  4. I live in America and everyone is always like, “Today I’m gonna tan for like three hours.” when its the summer and its 90 degrees outside (fahrenheit) but I’m all, “Nope not happening for me. I’m gonna be that person that doesn’t get skin cancer BITCH!” and so I sit wearing a sweatshirt with a hood and leggings the entire summer and then for the rest of the year too and people think I am INSANE but I just enjoy my paleness and don’t want to die.

    2 years ago
  5. oh yes, Aussies are BIG on tanning although a lot of older people (parents and grandparents, teachers too) will tell us to wear sun cream, there is a song here that we follow, everyone knows it,

    ‘Slip, Slop, Slap!’ theres a few versions on it that plays on tv evey summer to remind kids to wear it as aussies spend a lot of time out doors swimming in summer

    all my friends are really tanned, they look almost completely brown, tanning cream, tanning oil, tanning spay, tanning salons are huge and can be expensive anywhere.
    I on the other like my pale look so i avoid the sun, my feel reflect the sunlight and when im in the car wearing short skirts my skin reflex onto the bottom part of the dash board.

    2 years ago
  6. Here in Portugal people are in general crazy about tanning. The general population is perhaps a bit more relaxed about it and only worries about getting tanned in the summer, but celebrities and anyone a bit more obsessed about the way they look want to be tanned all year long. I make this distinction because, for better or worse, people in Portugal don’t seem to care about their appearance as much as people from many other countries. They do feel pressure to look good, of course, but for some reason the Portuguese aren’t particularly fashion-concious, don’t take very good care of their bodies (3rd fattest country in Europe), don’t commonly wear make up, etc. This is why the general population isn’t too obsessed with being tanned all year round, even though being tanned is considered beautiful while being white is not. Celebrities on the other hand are always tanned. Add to that the fact that most of them have brown eyes and honey-coloured hair, and the end result are people that look very monochromatic.

    As I mentioned, in this country being tanned is a sign of beauty. For that reason and because it’s a rather sunny country we have very high rates of skin cancer. Another reason for that is that a lot of people simply don’t use sun protection. They know they should, but they don’t. I think that on a subconscious level they think they’re not really going to get skin cancer.

    I personally don’t share many of countrymen’s beauty standards, which is why I don’t like the tanned look and am as white as I naturally can be. To be fair, in a country where being white is not a sign of beauty, that has never been a problem for me. My boyfriend sometimes tells me I’d look better with tanned skin, but since I don’t agree with him and I know the sun is highly damaging to the skin, I’m not going to get a tan any time soon.

    2 years ago
  7. Bel

    Tanning is popular in Argentina. And it’s a dangerous trend since many people here try to have a really dark tanning which means that they don’t protect enough their skins and are overexposed to it during Summer.
    I’m not a big fan of it, yet I think a little exposure to the sun is beneficial for the health. For example, it’s good to prevent dental cavities, depression, osteoporosis, etc. (In my home-town there is Vitamin D deficiency.)

    2 years ago
  8. I live in norway and the sun rarely sets here in the summertime…but I gave up tanning a long time ago so i use spf all the time and usually carry a parasol/umbrella to keep the sun of my head…(i get migraines from sun exposure) I use a lot of korean products actually :)

    3 years ago
  9. LOL that’s a good question!

    3 years ago
  10. I’m Dutch but currently living in the UK and even though it’s only 1 hour by plane from my home town to here, there is a difference. In my experience in both countries people love having a tan, but the English skin seems to be less suited for it. European people will know what I mean… you can recognize English people when you’re on a holiday everywhere, because they are RED, ridiculously red XD Tanning salons are really big here, but especially the tanning spray thing. ORANGE is the new tanning colour here. I’m Dutch so I’m all pro orange (especially now with the world cup ;) ) but it’s kinda weird when it’s supposed to be a tan :’]

    3 years ago
  11. Im from Puerto Rico and here being tan is pretty, people do get made fun of sometimes for being white.

    3 years ago
  12. I live in AUS and am a mix of asian cultures and for a long long time I have remembered wanting to be lighter skinned, but I have come to the realisation that I simply love the sun too much. Having darker skin in a “lighter skin” ideal culture is something I have come to embrace. I do reviews of Korean/ Japanese/ Chinese and some western cosmetics on my blog: http://innervi.blogspot.com.au/
    From my experience I can definitely conclude that the products are not “whitening” but for “evening out” just like Martina said :) Seeing some people desperately trying to “bleach” their body to look whiter scares me for sure. We should just learn to love ourselves a little more; including our skin tone~

    3 years ago
  13. I’ve seen commercials in China for this black tar stuff that you smear on your skin in the shower, and when you rinse it off, it takes all the pigment with it. I’ve seen women here so whitened and powdered they have chemical burns on their legs and faces. The whitening stuff is scary.

    3 years ago
  14. I’m Chinese but I live in the US so I’ve experienced both the love for whiter skin (in China) and the love of tanning (in the US).
    ;D i have an EXCITING theory as to why:
    so in China, tanned skin meant you had to work outside in the fields to survive; aka, you were poorer and so turned darker. but if you didn’t have to work outside, aka, you were wealthy, then you had nicer, more desirable whiter skin.
    in the US, most people have never worked in the fields. and with the internet and staying inside for your entire life an actual possibility, a tan means you go out often with friends; aka, you have a (social) life. but paler skin meant you stayed inside because there was nothing for you outside; aka, you don’t have a socially acceptable life. (<– because, i mean, seriously, living on the internet all the time, like on tumblr/youtube/fbk has a negative… patina? sheen? impression? it's just not "cool")

    3 years ago
    • It is true but it rather mainly applied to places like Europe where you see women wearing all sorts of clothing to cover themselves and carry those small umbrellas to stay white because that means they are at a higher social status and are richer compared to those who are darker.

      2 years ago
  15. As you well know being Canadians yourself sunscreen isn’t a huge deal unless its summertime, but women actually have it a bit better than men, a lot of moisturizers and foundations have spf in it mine as 30 in my moisturizer ( I don’t really wear foundation unless its a special occasion) but BB Cream has it too. But what most Canadians don’t know is that you’re actually at a higher risk of getting damaged skin in the wintertime. I never used to wear sunscreen in the winter…until I got a sunburn while skiing… so now I do if I’m going to be out all day lol. Tanning is a big thing here too, especially if youre supposed to be a “gym rat” apparently if you’re not tanned you’re not working out. Anyways that was way longer than I expected :P

    3 years ago
    • Haha I love that you pointed that out, but its seems that many people aren’t aware that the UV rays are quite harsh even if there is no sun out (ie. winter time) Its best if you can apply sunscreen everyday, sun or not !

      3 years ago
  16. In America its totally normal to get a tan because pale skin isn’t sexy enough. People need that sun-kissed skin even though it causes cancer and can ruin it forever. You would think at least for how health crazy Californians are, they would appreciate taking care of their skin and wearing SPF and not tanning.

    3 years ago
  17. Oh my goodness, where I live, tanning is so popular. I have friends that, when we get back to school on a Monday, first thing they’ll tell me is, “Oh my gosh, you guys, this weekend was awesome! I sat outside all day covered in oil and fried myself with the sun and look how tan I got!” And I shake my head with disappointment. Another time, a friend of mine was saying how she got a job at a water park during the summer, and another girl excitedly commented, “Oh my gosh, you’re going to get so tan!” as if it was a great thing. When I tell people here that I wear sunblock on a daily basis, they think I’m silly and stupid, they say, “The sun’s not even out!” but obviously there are still UV rays. No one around here except for the other friends of mine that are Asian and are still connected to the customs they had in their respective native countries, understand how dangerous tanning is.

    3 years ago
  18. As a pale redhead, my Mom grounded me once after getting a bad sunburn. My dad who is also pale, had to get a bit of skin cancer removed as well, so I’m extra careful with sunscreen. Growing up there were tanning salons everywhere, but it seems people are more getting on board with “spray tans” instead. The tanned look is definitely more popular in LA, but in NYC there’s still droves of people heading to the beach to get some color. All of my friends in high school who were really into tanning look much older now because of it. But don’t get me started on American dermatologists. You have to get a physical from a regular doctor before even getting referred to a derm and shelling out $250 a visit. I’ll just stick with my Korean sheet masks and hope for the best.

    3 years ago
  19. And Rain got this sexy tan :D

    3 years ago
  20. Hmm, I’m trying so hard to see what responses to give to the questions provided above. I’ll speak based on my experiences living here (Dominican Republic) and the years lived in NYC. In the States is quite different – well, at least in NYC – when it hits summer, people do not hesitate to go the beach or the park – namely Central Park, for instance – to just lay down on the grass to tan for quite some time – and by quite some time, I mean it! – it’s crazy how people wait for that time of year to jam the parks and beaches just to tan! I used to hate summer over there – perhaps because of the overbearing humid weather – so I would stay home or stay indoors as much as possible. I live in DR now and people here are either naturally tanned or dark-skinned – there’re a lot of white people too. It’s crazy ‘cus I get mocked by my peers for being pale – I’m not even white, medium-toned to say the most. It’s not like it’s mandatory for you to be tanned here, but it’s pretty normal I guess. People here don’t really care much about sunblock or anything likewise, only if you actually go to the beach – I suppose. I guess because I live on the coast, in the capital – and we’re really close to the sea – that people really don’t mind much about sunblock or any kind of skin protector. It’s funny ‘cus some Asians here do walk with umbrellas when the sun is at its boiling point. Anywho, I’ve also noticed that skincare is not celebrated much here either – except, perhaps, girls of middle/high class but they just focus more on make-up. Regarding whitening cream though, do you guys recommend any brand in particular? I personally have this sort of not-that-noticeable unbalanced tone on my face.

    3 years ago
  21. HI EYK Crew! I, like Martina have EDS TYPE 3 and even though I haven’t broke any bones. I can’t walk far and have to use a wheelchair for moving outside the house. I know that the subject may be boring or useless for some nasties but PLEASE do a tl;dr on disability in korea. Things like, are places accessible to wheelchairs, would it affect getting a job and peoples reactions. Love from Lauren in the uk!

    3 years ago
  22. Oh boy tanning, ain’t that a fun way to spend the summer. I live in the UK and tanning is a big thing for the youngns. We only get like 3 days of summer a year so on a rare occasion of the sun appearing, we will all be outside soaking it up. This is probably why our skin cancer rates are so high. My mum one time said I need to get out in the sun and get a tan. The problem is I don’t tan, I burrrrrn! Personally I like using a gradual tanning moisturizer, as my skin is pale as eff, anything too sudden will look weird. Yes I have jumped onto the tanning bandwagon here. But only the safe way! Remember the three S’s: Slip on a t-shirt, Slap on a hat and Slop on some sunscreen!

    3 years ago
  23. I was wondering, if you can do some TL;DR’s about rural life in Korea, do you guys know or met anyone who is not in a big city in Korea? Or have you ever been there? Everyone talks about Incheon, or Busan, or Seoul, but what about the less talked about places? I’m curious about those smaller cities.

    3 years ago
  24. I’m from Connecticut, and a majority of the people around where I live like to go to tanning salons or simply lay out on the beaches to get tan. I, on the other hand, am very, very pale (to the point where my family makes fun of me sometimes and says that I look like a ghost) because I don’t tan easily and don’t particularly enjoy staying in the sun for long periods of time. I’ll be spending a lot of time helping my dad cut lawns this summer though, and I’ll be sure to remember to put on sun screen!!

    3 years ago
  25. Love that — “cancer isn’t on my to-do list in life”!

    3 years ago
  26. Difficult subject. I was on a food tour in Seoul recently and they skirted around the issue but showed us dog meat restaurants “if we were interested”. We all declined of course as dogs were pets and friends to those of us on the tour, but I think it is actually a bit of a thing in the food tour business for Western cultures. They seemed to put it to us tentatively but then withdraw it quickly when we weren’t interested — seemed to be testing the waters a little. They did show us the ‘secret symbols’ that certain restaurants use to indicate they have this meat available though. We were also offered the whole live octopus thing, which we also couldn’t do, but it is a very popular option in Seoul. The whole dog meat thing is a much bigger business now from what I have seen in China, although this is in certain regions and only based on my experiences there (pamphlets etc that are readily available). It is absolutely not my thing at all — but I am also traumatised still from seeing a man in the street outside my hotel in Beijing trying to sell a huge tortoise to passing motorists as a dinner option by waving it about in the street by its tail. I also actually can’t do live fish or crabs either to be honest, so I am very, very squeamish. So you have to respect the whole process of acculturation in these issues too.

    3 years ago
  27. Thank you so much for explaining whitening is the wrong term. I had heard it on a few korean dramas and it made me cringe just as tanning salons make me cringe. I just think it’s bad to chemically make the skin a different color.

    US is getting much better teaching kids about wearing hats and sunscreen. But only for the young grades. Rash guards, shirts to wear in the water are really common with the little kids at least. I don’t know if that training will follow through life?

    3 years ago
  28. Im from Sydney, Australia and I remember when I was in primary school that I was not allowed to leave outside for lunch if I did not have a hat and put suncream on. But may be my school was a little different from other schools

    3 years ago
    • Nope, that’s the Australian way. But comparing my skin to the beautiful Korean women when I am in Seoul, I have to admit there is something that they are doing (or have done) that creates that immaculate complexion. When I am in Seoul, I look old, wrinkly and haggard. But when I get back to Australia, I look fresh and I can’t get over how damaged and wrinkled some skin is!

      By the way, it would be great to do a WANK on ‘cosmetics street’ – say Myeongdong – and go through the different beauty, skincare and cosmetics places available and how they differ (or are the same!). Cosmetics shopping in Seoul is a really huge business now, and many Western countries don’t have these brands and people don’t know how good and inexpensive they are!

      3 years ago
  29. Both sunblock and sunscreen have spf(sun protection factor). It just means how long you can stay in the sun before you start to burn. The higher the spf, the longer you can stay in the sun before you need to reapply. The spf part of sunscreen breaks down and no longer works after a while. The spf of sunblock works indefinitely, it just wears off your skin over time due to water/sweat/movement(like makeup).

    3 years ago
  30. I live in a white-opia where there’s a rainbow of blondes and aging blondes. Whats funny though is that a lot of these people see tans as a good thing. Like, right now it’s prom season and all the girls are going to get tan either from spray tans or tanning beds. It’s kind of funny; like, “What better way to commemorate this special occasion than by getting orange?!”. They get it in spades later on though when they make the change from young blonde to mom blonde and they realize how devastated their skin is.

    3 years ago
  31. I used to love being tan when I was a teenager. I spent a lot of time outside and playing sports, so being tan was normal for me. But when I entered university and went home for spring break my parents told me I had gotten really white. They complimented on how nice I looked and noticed how I had nice skin as well. Now, I don’t like being tan. I don’t like getting tan lines or looking dark. I was always pretty white, my parents told me how my sister and I had snow white skin and rosy cheeks. Its weird, I thought being tan was a good thing, but I know its not so good because it does age you. I really liked this TL;DR!! :D

    3 years ago
  32. This video was not only about creepy crawlers but they do talk about the jellyfish and some other things.

    http://www.eatyourkimchi.com/how-to-die-in-korea/

    3 years ago
  33. Sorry, but whether or not they have children is one topic that they have repeatedly said they would like to keep private and they would not be discussing it in their videos.

    Cheers, Natz

    3 years ago
  34. They don’t call it “weathered” for nothing. Freezing your skin makes it chipped. Frying it makes it red and stingy. Too much exposure to rough wind isn’t good either. Too much water wrinkles it and makes it fall off faster. So, yes, it’s logical that too much of anything is bad for your skin. But not enough is also bad.

    3 years ago
  35. uhmm…I think that their good skin could be indeed the result of some genetic predisposition…but I also noticed Korean people spend a lot of time and money caring for it, so it might be an half and half of a reason…as for the white skin and the level of skin cancer, well, here in South Italy we have a lot of different skin types, since our origins are mixed with mediterranean people, Middle East, North European and so on…but it is true that we like the sun and we don’t do a lot to protect ourselves, even if the danger about skin cancer, lately, is considered much more than in the past…so maybe the things are changing little by little…anyway it is not for an esthetic reason…mediterranean beauties are generally olive skinned…

    3 years ago
  36. The typical beach look is incredibly popular in Australia and the stigma against sunscreen/block is here too. I prefer pale skin on myself since I dye my hair all these weird colours and it goes well with it. I think the difference between sunscreen and sunblock is that sunscreen still allows you to tan(???) whereas sunblock physically blocks the rays. I also found that a lot of the sunscreen is INCREDIBLY greasy in Straya while Asian products dry matte.

    3 years ago
  37. As someone who works for a dermatologist in CA that launched their own online skin care business and manages her social media/blog, I would say skin care is valued in North America almost equally to Korea for women (not men, they are still an enigma for the skin care industry here). However, the cost for high quality products is the main barrier from skin care being a common daily practice. For example: high quality sunscreens that are non-nano, oil-free or moisturizing, all natural or use only mineral physical broadband UV blockers (zinc oxides or titanium oxides, chemical sunscreens are rubbish) start at $20 for a 3.5 oz bottle to $30 for a 2 oz bottle. To truly protect your entire body, the average person should apply 1 oz of sunscreen to their entire exposed body parts. When a good quality sunscreen is $25 for a 3.5 oz bottle, it is not really affordable if it only last for 3-4 uses.

    Also when it comes to dermatology procedures/visits, as S&M noted, costs become an issue again. Since I get employee perks, I have had plenty of free laser treatments (BBL’s) and even a profractional to correct the scars/damage from an infection that overtook half my face. I never thought my face would look smooth again, but after these treatments my friends constantly complement my skin and ask what I have done. Once I explain the cost for laser treatments are in the thousands and products in hundreds, they suddenly go: “If I had the money I would take care of my skin, but I simply cannot afford that.” At that point, I try to direct them to the bare minimum products but then they miss out on some very effective products. Generally only older women have the kind of expendable income needed to spend on anti-aging skin care procedures and products. But by the time most people reach the age to be able to afford skin care products or trips to the dermatologist, much of the damage has already been done.

    Instead of dermatologists, most women go to aestheticians for skin care services since it is more affordable than a doctor visit and they get a “spa-like” pampering. We even have a medical aesthetician at our dermatology practice to capture this demographic of clients. At time, aestheticians can even be too pricey.

    Basically: Cost is why skin care practices are not more prevalent in the US at least, but this doesn’t mean people do not care about their skin. The psychological toll and impacts on self esteem from skin issues is astounding.

    3 years ago
  38. I understand the “sunscreen situation” completely! I have really fair skin and even if I don’t burn, I’ll get sun freckles ;_; -le cry- So everytime I walk home or go out (even in Winter), I use sunscreen and/or a hat. Curse you Australian sun! (I don’t know if it’s because I’m part pale-vampire, but I get burnt sooo often in the Australian sun!)

    3 years ago
  39. I tan just being outside, but I am naturally dark skinned. However where I am from a tan shows your status. I live in a farming
    community so the most common tan here is a farmer’s tan where the arms, neck, and face tan from working or playing in the sun. However the people who live up town have regular pass to a salon or Penn their own tanning bed. Here they like to show that they are trendy, have money, and/or they enjoy looking like leather. On the other hand I have been to a dermatologist and he told me to actually visit a tanning bed every now and again to keep my skin from being too oily. So they have health uses but most here they show status. #BlueUSNasty #Tennessee

    3 years ago
  40. That makes no sense….. So is the goal for everyone to have medium skin or for people to be what they aren’t and risk serious health issues along the way? D: Bleaching your skin is very bad for it and very dangerous! Same as staying in the sun without sunscreen for too long when you look like the white of paper. Urgh. I wish people would learn to accept their skin more…

    3 years ago
  41. Unless you’re naturally tan, where I live (good ole’ Sweden), you better be wearing sunscreen or you will become a lobster. We don’t tan here. We burn. We burn and shrivel up and then cry every time we move a limb. ._. Personally, I don’t like tans anyway. I like peoples’ natural skin regardless of what color it is or what it looks like. Tans feel like the sun flipping you off. Well, almost as much as getting a sunburn.

    Those comparison photos at the beginning were nice. Everyone needs a reminder that celebrities are always photoshopped. Someone mentioned how in Norway everyone races to get a tan. The same thing happens here but sometimes I wonder if the average Norwegian has different skin than us Swedes, because all my Norwegian friends successfully get their beloved tans and never get burned, whereas my friends and I get red and a heightened risk of skin cancer. Dare I say it’s because they’re a lot more outdoorsy, and now that I think about it a lot of pure-Norwegians have fairly dark skin. Not like dark-dark but definitely on the darker side of the pale spectrum. xD There’s actually a word for Norwegians who go against the stereotype of blonde-haired, blue eyed, porcelain-white skin; black Norwegian. I know, how creative. It has nothing to do with race though, or the “race”. But some people prefer to call “black Norwegians” chocolate Norwegians (don’t know anyone who isn’t a foreigner who uses that) or Jotunns because we hate to love our neighbors.

    It’s just what happens to people who live more up north. Yes, more north. Not as much cloud cover up there so there’s a lot more sun exposure. This goes for everywhere in the world that’s near the arctic circle or above! Actually, it partially applies to me too. I have very pale skin but black hair and black eyes. Shock!

    Now that I think about it, at least 3/4 of my Norwegian friends have tons freckles, too. Hmmm…

    Those sleeves look so silly! They’re like the sad cousin of fake tattoo sleeves. :( But at least they do their job, I suppose… By the way, how do you suppose us Westerners go about convincing Korean dermatologists and skin product companies to bring their stuff over this way? >>;; They’d be swimming in pools of cash for sure if they brought over their BB cream.

    3 years ago
  42. I’m a naturally dark skinned person so tanning happens on its own. However the type of tan you have here actually shows your status in a way. I live in a farming community and so lots of people here have farmer tans where mostly their arms, face, and neck are tan. While the more up town people have regular passes to tanning salons or own their own tanning bed. This tan shows they have money, are trendy, and or they enjoy looking like leather. I went to a dermatologist who a actually told me to visit a tanning bed every now and again to help my skin from being oily so I wouldn’t break out. So they have health uses but mostly here they are to show status. #BlueUSNasty #Tennessee

    3 years ago
  43. Martina! unrelated, but I saw you on the news here in NZ :O funny thing was was that it was about how teens should have permission from parents before getting tattoos(was showing footage of you getting your tat done)…and I was thinking “But Martina is in her early 30’s… ._.” Was still cool seeing you on telly though XD Did you give them permission to use your vid?

    3 years ago
    • Yeah I thought it was random too… They must have just randomly grabbed a video off of youtube of what they thought was a teenager getting a tattoo done :/ it was on a show called seven sharp. Sorry I meant talk show, not news. But yeah took me by surprise, I was like eating dinner and then, “OMG I KNOW THAT PERSON!”. Yeep.

      3 years ago
  44. In Poland people tend to have strong tan. They actually say, that tanned skin looks healthy and white skin makes people look like they’re sick. My skin is very pale, and my mom tells me every morning, when I go to work, that Iook bad with such a white skin and I should get some tan. Once, she even convinced my dad to tell me the same. All the BB’s and most foundations available in Poland are too dark for me, it took me some years to find one, that is matching my skin tone.

    3 years ago
    • That’s horrible! No mother should ever be so rude to someone, especially their child! :( I’m sorry that happens to you. Every skin color is beautiful, don’t let her get away with telling you otherwise.

      3 years ago
      • You’re right, but she doesn’t mean to hurt me, it’s just that her idea of beauty is different than mine. I’m fine with it, I’m too old to take this seriously, arguments didn’t change anything, so my usual answer is just “yes mom, you’re right” and then I go my own way :) This way both sides are happy ;)

        3 years ago
  45. I live in the US (Washington state) and I had a professor who was from England. He told the students that he loves Seattle because the weather was very similar to England and reminded him of home lol

    3 years ago
  46. Sun? What is this sun you speak of?
    I live in Washington state in the US and its pretty much rain and gloom here 300 days of the year. We can’t escape rain and gloom even in the summer. While people were dying from and complaining about the heat wave in the US last summer, it was raining here in Washington state. Most people are pretty pale here. Most people with a tan either get it by going to tanning salons or it’s their natural skin tone.

    Whenever it’s a rare sunny day here I like to take advantage of it and will usually stay out for hours. I don’t usually wear sunscreen and I don’t know many people who do. I feel like a vampire sometimes when I’m out in the sun just because I’m so pale. I’m actually trying to tan right now by spending more time outdoors when it’s sunny. Some of my Asian friends who come from different countries find it odd that I’m trying to tan. They always tell me how jealous they are of my pale skin. Its weird because I hate my pale skin, and here they are telling me that they wish they had my skin tone.

    3 years ago
  47. I’m sorry but I love the sun. I won’t purposely tan but I don’t wear sunscreen either. People usually think I’m 10 years younger so I feel that a little sun might help age me. The sun is actually very good for you. What isn’t, is the UV rays which is let in by the holes in the Ozone layer (yay pollution). And sunscreen isn’t healthy for you either. So it’s damned if you do and damned if you don’t kinda thing.

    3 years ago
  48. In Australia out relationship with the sun is a little odd I think. On one hand you do have the tanned Aussie stereotype and like North America that tanned look is still popular here. However, on the ther hand the Australian sun is very strong (seriously even in winter it’s crazy) and in Queensland (the state I live in) we have the highest rate of skin cancer in the world because of the strength of the sun and people’s exposure to it. So people are very aware of that too. It’s a bit of a war to be honest.

    3 years ago
  49. I live in the north of Mexico, and particularly at my city because it seems this doesn’t happen to neighboring cities, we have only two seasons, winter and summer. If it is winter, we stick to the sun and anything warm like lizards, and if it is summer, we avoid the sun at all cost, ’cause at worst case scenario, if you take your hand from the shadows, to directly under the sun, your hand will immidiately burn from how hot the weather is. IF we have any intermediate time, like the so called spring or autumn it will last only a couple of weeks and then you are hit be extreme heat or cold.

    3 years ago
  50. I’m from the US where tanning is still big, but I’ve never been into it myself. I was taught from a very young age to keep my skin protected because my mom (who grew up in southern California during a time when most people thought the sun could do no wrong) got precancerous spots on her skin from having tanned so much when she was younger. she had to get them all frozen off by a dermatologist (not all at once, mind you. it was a pretty long process). luckily all of them were gone before they turned into actual skin cancer, but because of that my mom has always encouraged skin protection. I was the dorky kid putting on sunscreen at the beach, hahahaha.

    3 years ago
  51. Simon and Marina’s skin is nice :D I love Etude House BB cream. It would be nice if you guys could talk about Kris’ lawsuit against SM and give us your opinion. I’m afraid though you guys would get into an annoying conflict with SM lol.

    3 years ago
  52. lmd

    Be honest Simon, are you wearing BB cream in this video? Because your face looks remarkably even, almost glowing.

    Caucasian girl from America here. I honestly didn’t care so much (or know much tbh) about skincare and how harmful UV rays were until I was about 20/21 yrs old. Since then, I do my best to put sunscreen on each morning. It has definitely helped that the beauty industry has made women more aware of how harmful the sun is for skin. More products have SPF in them now than they did when I was growing up (bb creams, face powders, body lotions, anti-aging lotions).

    3 years ago
  53. Basic Asian Skin Care MUST!

    sunlight causes 80% of aging skin problems.
    – wrinkles, spotes, color discoloration, or unevenness ect…
    – Were SPF 25 and above for everyday (winter – even indoor) and 50and higher for outdoor (summer weather)

    Exfoliate at least Once a week
    (Dry skin – 1/week, oily skin – 2/week, and domination skin – 2/week in T – Zone)

    Hydrate!!!!! Even oily skin needs to be hydrated!
    besides drinking lots of water you should also use a non alcohol toner to allow your lotions (generally for combination skin), gels (oily skin), and creams (dry skin) to sink in better and protect your skin!

    Eye Gel – It must be clear to be a gel. Gel don’t block pores especially important since the skin around your eyes are 10 times thinner than your face. So if you see little pumps or dotes under your eye than your either putting too much product on there, using wrong product, or putting your face cream to close to the eye area.

    Acne – when using acne treatments (usually contain 2% Salicylic Acid) make sure to use a Que tip to put on the places you need it (spot treatment) and ALWAYS were sunscreen on top of it in the Day to prevent the treated skin from getting darkened more.

    These are from my own experience and cause my mom owns a spa. Hope it helps!

    3 years ago
  54. I live on the east coast of the U.S and I’m also Hispanic.Hispanic media here seem to from what I’ve observed promote tanned skin as healthy and fair colored skin as sickly. Many of the mc’s and celebrities get fake tans just to fit the image of healthiness and beauty portrayed. A lot Hispanic girls love to tan once spring hits as well as Caucasian girls.What I find interesting is that my family in particular follows the Asian tradition that fair skin means that you don’t do arduous work as my mother, grandmother and aunts compliment my fair skin often. I think it has to do that they grew in Latin America and they grew up seeing the upper class women with fair skin as they didn’t have to work in fields. To them fair skin means youth and wealth.

    3 years ago
  55. i feel like japan is a less-intense version of korea in the skin protection field…. lots of girls carry around umbrellas in the sun, and sunscreen is a grand money-sucker, but guys don’t seem to give shit and it’s not as wide spread as korea. i mean, you’ll see the old folks with the funky sun visors, but…. it’s kind of too late for them

    3 years ago
  56. I live in Japan at the moment, and they have the same feelings on the sun as the Koreans- for the most part. Some of the younger girls do get tanned, but it’s a small percentage. However, I have noticed more people with bad skin in Japan…

    3 years ago
  57. I’m Asian-American (Chinese-Japanese to be specific), and as per fashion, all of my friends compliment my skin which has become quite dark because of being on a swim team. I noticed that my generation tends to prefer the tan-skin look, even if it’s a bit dark, in comparison to pale/fair skin. At the same time, while my mother is neither negative or positive about my coloration (maybe because she grew up in Europe), but my grandmother calls me an Ethiopian. (Yes, I know. WHAT?) Maybe she’s comparing my color now to my natural skin color (baby-butt white).
    From this, I noticed two things:
    1) America’s Generation Y has an obsession with fitness and see things like tanned skin as a reflection of one’s health and beauty.
    2) Older Asian people still very much take notice of skin color, quality, etc, even if they don’t have a preference about it.
    Bonus: Most American kids hate wearing sunscreen, but not because it’s lame- it’s because they hate the texture.

    3 years ago
  58. Hi guys! I live in the U.S and a lot of people are encouraged to go out and tan. I loved how you pointed out photoshopping celebrities in magazines and ads because it is a topic that really needs to be addressed. Right now, there’s a bill to cut down photo-shopping in U.S. magazines and personally it brings a whole lot of body image issues not only for women but men too. In addition I feel there needs to be a ban because it poses a fake image to those who desperately try to “become” like there idol/celebrity when in reality that is not what they look like. Children and adolescents are a major concern being influenced by this. I personally don’t want anyone to have body issues and develop any eating disorder to which I have fully experienced myself. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9AAo58Owjs

    As for whether a tan is acceptable, generally, Yes. As for me, I avoid the sun as if it were a plague. No seriously guys I am so sensitive to the sun. It’s a health concern for me visually (these eyes hurt and I can’t stay in the sun for long because I get easily dehydrated).For me especially, I am obligated to take care of how much exposure I have to sunlight by wearing protective clothing, and hydrate. One point I would like to make,you cannot avoid the sun entirely because you do need it to produce Vitamin D (check link here –> http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/vitamin-d-deficiency) . And so people do need sunlight to get Vitamin D, I mean a little tan won’t hurt you and so you do need sunlight in order to produce Vitamin D to help you :D

    (***I’m not a true professional so correct me if I’m wrong but I’ve learned this considering I have my own medical problems and my own experiences.)

    3 years ago
  59. notice how yoon eun hye and jessica alba still look good in the “before” shots lol also yea clearly in the us tanning is a big thing with all the self tanners and stuff.. i personally don’t care too much i have accepted my paleness lol

    3 years ago
  60. Honestly, I kind of hate summer because I constantly get made fun of for being so pale. I do not like to tan. I didn’t mind it too much when I was little (pre-teen) but I hated that I freckled. Then I remember for like senior prom, I went to the tanning salon and got really tan. I think that was the last time I really got tan though. I’d rather be pale.

    Although, being so pale has some disadvantages. I went to the beach for a business trip (how awesome is that!) and the water was super clear. Well every time I looked down, I had swarms of fish around me. I think they thought my legs were like the mother fish or something. LOL. …Also, my mom just told me the other day “eww, you look like a frozen turkey, you’re so pale”. I was like…gee thanks mom! d(^u^)b

    3 years ago
  61. So true. Actually my sister and me were talking about this and we came to the conclusion that korean skin care is a lot about prevention and make the skin healthier. That’s why they like moisturized and glowing skin. While here, only if you already see a problem in your skin you try to fix it or when people start getting wrinkles they go crazy and buy tons of products to erase them (I don’t even think that wrinkles are that bad, I know I’m gonna get them at some point anyway).

    3 years ago
  62. I’m Korean and I live in Los Angeles, California and I have to admit being tan is definitely equivalent to being “healthy” (ironic, no?). But what’s interesting is I think I’m influenced by both sides of the spectrum (Korean and American). My mom tells me to put sunblock on everyday, even if it’s just to go to and from work. She used to say I was too tan when I was younger because I swam often. And she definitely has those sleeves for the car. Now that I’ve been stuck indoors, I’ve lost my tan, but she still get reminds me to wear sunblock all the time..

    On the other hand, my dad told me recently that I’m too pale now and look like I’m sick. Also, I know that my aunt goes to the tanning salon regularly and was envious of how tan I had been in the past. All the while, they’re still very strong proponents of sunblock too.
    SO I think the environment and beauty standards of where you live definitely play a role in what you’re aiming for. But I agree that the Korean people I know are very big on always wearing sunscreen.

    Oh and most of the sushi places (except like the really legit, expensive, “famous sushi chef” places) are owned by Korean people in California.

    3 years ago
  63. I personally wanted a mole removed when I was ten because it was on my nose and it kept growing bigger. However, at the time I thought it was a freckle. So I asked my mom and she took me to the dermatologist to get it taken off with a laser. But then they broke the news that I had a mole on my nose and began to treat my mother like a stage mom who was trying to make her daughter look “perfect”. It got so weird at one point they asked me if I had named my mole!!! I was so dumbfounded I couldn’t respond. My mom being my mom then took me to another doctor and he made me wait three years to take it off because I was so young. When he did take it off he called me Rudolf, the white nosed reindeer…

    Overall, doing what I did isn’t too common in America. In fact there is kind of a social stigma about any kind of changing the way you look through surgery. In terms of taking care of your skin… well I’m from Seattle, so people using sunscreen isn’t common unless if it’s summer. Even then I forget because I’m so used to not using sunscreen. It’s not that I or anyone is against it, I just forget. In all honesty I need to put on sunscreen more because I do have such pasty white skin.

    Concerning suntan booths there are a lot around Seattle and I do know people who go to them. Recently though, there has been recent criticism against using them because of the cancers they cause being reported on the news. But I still see people getting tans on vacation or in a suntan booth.

    For teenagers there has been a lot of acne skin care products that have come out but nobody really goes to the dermatologist unless they have major acne problems

    Also, when I was in Japan I noticed everybody used umbrellas, even when it was sunny outside. In Seattle, we don’t even use umbrellas when it rains! Which is always…

    3 years ago
  64. Wow ten bucks a mole! In the US the cost ranges from 100 to 500 dollars PER MOLE!

    3 years ago
  65. ahaha I just commented something similar :P (I’m from Wales though, so even more rain lol)

    3 years ago
  66. I think skin cancer is more common in the UK because the sun is so very rare. T.T
    So when the sun does come out everyone will spend as much time as possible outside because we don’t know when we’ll see it next. Or failing that, they go on holiday to sunny countries and make the most of the sun there.
    Usually were I live, we only get about 2-3 weeks of hot sun a year, sometimes only 1 week. (excluding last year due to the random heatwave).
    So we are not careful in the sun because we are not used to thinking about it being dangerous and see it more as a rare treat.
    That’s my theory anyway.
    Also, sunbeds are pretty common here but I don’t know many people who actually use them. Most people just fake it.

    3 years ago
  67. To be honest it doesn’t surprise me that skin cancer is so high on the list for the UK, although really, we don’t receive thaaatt much sunlight. Here people will go to extreme lengths to get tans, especially in certain areas where sun beds are still soooo popular despite them being proven that they’re so bad for you. When you go on holiday its quite common for the brits to not put on much sun cream as well, as I guess we all want to come home looking beautifully bronze – however this often backfires and we normally end up looking like burnt lobsters – just a general observation!

    3 years ago
  68. While I don’t know much about which foods have which nutrients, might there be a possibility that the typical Korean diet might influence the vitamin D intake? If I have been told correctly, more of your vitamin D comes from food and drink than from the sun.

    3 years ago
    • Nah, it’s the sun that is a major source. I grew up and currently live in the Caribbean and am black but I lived in the US for quite a few years for college. Many of my West Indian friends had issues with Seasonal Affective Disorder ( SAD) during winter because we had to stay indoors a lot during winter and we were of course used to a lot more sunlight. My friend even bought a UV lamp for her room to help combat it.

      It was something I wish I had been warned about before I moved there. I would have known to start taking vitamin d supplements to combat it.

      3 years ago
  69. Can we just take a moment to acknowledge that green cream is a genius idea that needs to be brought to North America immediately, along with lavender blush, sponge cushions (is that what they’re called? Like the Etude House Precious Mineral Any Cushion.), and packaging that doesn’t fall apart the first time you open it.

    3 years ago
    • if you have a sephora, theres actually quite alot of green creams that have been out for awhile, they come under the primers, but they literally cost more than twice of korean brands even though they have exactly the same effect, which is why i stocked up like crazy when i went to seoul for hols

      3 years ago
  70. You guys never ask questions that us Americans can answer… Discrimination! Lol jk I love you guys. But seriously, you already know about tanning in North America, sooooo…. I got nothing interesting to say lol. XD

    3 years ago
  71. “Moreno” is “brown” in Spanish, isn’t it???

    3 years ago
    • Moreno or Morena is often used in Spanish speaking countries as a word to describe someone as being dark in some way (hair, eyes, skin). It varies by culture. The Philippines were colonized by Spain for about 300 years, so there is a lot of Spanish influence in the language.

      3 years ago
  72. I’m going to be honest I think I got more self- conscious about the look and health of my skin when i got into kpop. I never wore spf back in high school, but then noticed most Korean idols had EVEN looking skin. Korea has an overabundance of high spf moisturizers, sunscreens, make up products etc. While in the US, most of the make up and moisturizers rarely have a spf more than 15. I started realizing that my farmer’s tan needs to go so I religiously put on spf even though I may not be exposed to the sun for long periods. I wear those “arm covers” so I don’t get a tan on my left arm when I am driving around in the high peak sun hours. I hope starting now I can age gracefully.

    3 years ago
  73. So since I live on a tropical island and am black, I get made fun of when I pull out my sunscreen. Especially since I have to use the white tinting zinc oxide stuff ( allergic to chemical sunscreens). On a day to day basis I use a bb cream with zinc oxide in it and for those days at the beach I go full force with my ashyfying white sunblock that makes me look horrible. But I don’t care. I got mole removal done last year and I don’t intend to have it done again anytime soon. But normally people here don’t use it. It is mostly seen as a ‘tourist’ thing. I can usually tell the difference between white tourists and white Bajans because white Bajans have the permatan that comes from living in the sun most of their lives ( and of course the more obvious Bajan accent).

    I also have a dermatologist here because I have had problems with my skin but it is not the norm for most people. But I have gotten lots of compliments from people about how bright and clear my skin has been looking. I also credit drinking tons of water for that.

    3 years ago
  74. As a black person living in the Caribbean I get laughed at but I still put on sunblock ( as I am allergic to chemical sunscreens) whenever I go out into the sun. I know it is less likely for me to get skin cancer but I also consider things like uneven skin and as I get older how I started to get more moles. I got my moles removed last year and I don’t intend on getting them back. Hats and zinc oxide it is then.

    3 years ago
  75. mia

    Do you guys have any sunscreen recommendation? eg, what do these guys regularly use?

    3 years ago
  76. at 28:47 and on they talk about male ideals and go on an adventure, but watch the whole video.http://youtu.be/ChPxXYMi0Nw

    3 years ago
  77. CDs in cereal boxes? Ha. I’m so old, when I were a lad we used to cut 45 rpm singles out of the backs of cereal boxes. Those were the days… Meanwhile, as far as tanning, in the U.S. the tanning thing started in the early part of the 20th Century, where I grew up in the NY area, when boating became popular among the wealthy, who would spend their weekends out on the Long Island Sound and such on their boats and return Monday morning with deep brown tans. It was a status symbol and thus eventually spread down the socio-economic ladder.

    3 years ago
  78. I don’t know why but in my head it’s always Martina writing the blogpost and then I read “I also had one on my chin, and at least five times a month, I’d cut it open while shaving” and I’m like…what is happening?!! And I get all confused and then angry at myself for forgetting that it’s mostly Simon writing these..

    3 years ago
  79. i know it’s a bit of crazy question but can i ask what sunscreen you use? i’m just wondering whether it’s a daily one or whether it’s the usual fairly gloopy type that is the usual sunscreen of summer X3 cos i feel rather shameful after hearing about your skincare regime >w<

    3 years ago
  80. I live in Southern California. what do u think the skin situation is here? Beaches, bikinis, tanning salons….everyone in my college is golden skinned practically. <_< except the Asians lol. I saw once these Asian girls but they were dressed in black and they were so white they looked like ghosts o_o I thought it was a bit much. but I understand; it's a cultural thing.
    but wow guys, this makes me feel like I have to see a dermatologist or at least try to get a facial or something?! o_O I have BB Cream though, I love that stuff cuz it definitely evens out my skin tone. u know this skin-tone thing leaves me conflicted too cuz I think "Hey, do I wanna look flawlessly tan w/ my fellow Californians? or do I wanna appeal to the Asian crowd and go w/ white skin?" I try to keep a happy medium.
    then of course there's the car windows-arms thing u mentioned. Ok, my windows aren't tinted AND I usually have them open with my arm hanging outside o_o so usually my arms are golden….I feel like I should protect my skin better guys.

    3 years ago
  81. I think the cancer thing can be genetic as well. I don’t think that all these artificial cosmetic products with a thousand different chemicals are good for anyone’s health. Maybe not skin cancer but you can get a gazillion allergies and other type of illness yu wouldn’t think about. I use a face wash because regular soap is too dry for me, but I refuse to use all these “moisturizing” day creams and night creams and eye creams and whatnot. I think most of these are utterly unnecessary for your skin, a large large portion of cosmetics is just targeted at your wallet, that’s it. If you want to moisturize your skin, DRINK A LOT OF WATER, instead of putting a hundred different type of creams on it. If really necessary, something organic like shea butter might do once in a while but NOT every day, multiple times a day. That’s my philosophy. I might not get a perfect looking skin like a K-pop star but at least I get less chemicals *under my skin*. :)

    3 years ago
  82. In the UK alot of people under the legal age of 18 go on sunbeds in order to feel more confident. 70% of people want to be tanned according to a certified site. I have also heard my friends say ‘i feel ugly, i need a tan’ or ‘Going on a sunbed. Yes!’ even though they know of the health disadvantages, as Cancer Research UK states ‘ when it came to the health risks, most teenagers knew about the potential dangers but were happy to accept or ignore them’ In schools alot of people use fake tan, or dark makeup that makes them look orange as it’s the ‘popular’ thing to do and it makes them more confident. [I’m not saying everyone.] I have even been playfully mocked by my family for being pale. So skin cancer being high on the list in UK does not surprise me.

    I loved this tldr! I always feel Koreans have great skin and a great outlook on skincare (Is the largest organ in our body you know) I feel like i need to go to Korea for the sole reason of skin care.

    3 years ago
  83. Even black people are geting tanned i DK!! ahah We love taking sunbath ;)

    3 years ago
  84. I live in England as well but I would say that the really fair skinned people use a hell of a lot of suncream on that occasional sunny day XD coz that’s what I do, otherwise it’s the lobster look for a week or so after

    3 years ago
  85. Let me just start out by saying, there is a tanning salon within walking distance from my house. People (around the Southern California area at least) seem to love doing that. I remember going to prom last year and seeing girls go from super white only two days before then turn into bronze statues for the dance. Even when I was walking around my college campus yesterday I saw a guy (who was typically 20 shades lighter) get stopped by a girl and she asked if she could steal his tan.

    Now me, I happen to be pretty darn white, so the sun likes to turn me into a lobster from time to time (or give me a farmer’s tan T_T). I have learned to either wear sunblock when I’m out in the open for long periods of time or I find a shady spot so that my arms don’t become darker than my face. I also quit using foundation for my face (because I prefer not to) and switched to a “moisture tint” that has SPF 15. And I soooo wish that I could find scent-less sunblock in stores around here so that I wouldn;t have to fear getting odd tan lines. (X_X)

    3 years ago
  86. Here is my question for a TL;DR!
    You mentioned in one of your videos that dental work is quite expensive. Could you talk a bit more about dentists in Korea as a whole? Also, are braces as common in Korea as they are in North America?

    3 years ago
    • I actually just went to the dentist! Seems like there was a lot of options for cosmetic dentistry, and even with insurance it (regular dentistry) is expensive. Not as expensive as the US (700 for a root canal vs. 1500-3000 lol) but fillings are expensive too (because they only use white. Don’t want mercury in their shop. At least where I went)

      3 years ago
    • Hmm. Interesting! Martina had to get a root canal here, and it did set us back quite a bit. We’ll look into the topic more :D

      3 years ago
  87. Rea

    Hey, I was wondering what those Korean face masks do for your skin, and why do girls always wear them in Kdramas? Do people use them a lot in Korea do people use creams more?

    3 years ago
  88. Rea

    I live in Houston, Texas, and what I noticed is that if prom or a big dance is coming up, a bunch of girls will go get spray tans, so they can look good for the dance. Im not sure why but people here HATE being pale. Some of my pale friends are really pretty and they always look down on themselves for not being able to tan.

    3 years ago
    • yeah but you run the risk of showing up looking like you work for Willy Wonka….

      3 years ago
      • Rea

        Very true, I don’t like it when my friends get spray tans.

        3 years ago
        • My poor silly daughter got one a few years ago right before she had to be in a wedding….she was in a panic. The orange just didn’t go with the lavender dress at all. She bathed and scrubbed and scrubbed for days and it just didn’t do any good. Naturally that was the best damned spray tan money could buy. It lasted for weeks….I can laugh about it now but oh the angst….

          3 years ago
        • Rea

          The same thing happened to one of my friends. I believe that people should be more confident in how they look, even if it can be hard at times.

          3 years ago
        • There used to be a tanning salon in every strip mall. Now I do think more people are deciding not to tan. Fifteen or 20 years ago tanning beds were at their peak. I think awareness is up quite a bit about the dangers. Also a lot of celebrities choose not to tan anymore which will make it more acceptable for the public to be pasty.

          3 years ago
        • Rea

          Thats great there are less tanning salons. Doesn’t it increase a persons chance of getting skin cancer if they are in a tanning bed to much?

          3 years ago
        • Rea

          It was really nice talking to you.

          3 years ago
  89. US dermatologists~ if needed is going to be pricey (shocker, right?) As far as skin care in the Midwest goes (from my personal experience and having acne since age 10 and severe in the teens) sadly I have spend *a bit* of money on my skin. Visits alone (with insurance) are going to be between $20~$40, and treatments/medications range. For example a Microdermabrasion was $150 a pop, and I had to get 5 to see the affects…Ouch… And going to a skin doc for something, like acne, is going to be a bit of experimentation with them trying to figure out what is best for you (naturally) PLUS the fact that the pharmaceutical sales market are breathing down their necks to get their medications (and samples) out there! So they may recommend medications and treatments for you that MAY NOT even be *the best option* for you specific skin issues…yeah. It’s an experience… as an oily skinned American, you hope you only have to go if truly necessary~ :P

    3 years ago
    • Absolutely…it’s about 100 dollars a mole to have them removed…just with that little can of freeze stuff…just sell me the can and I’ll get someone to shoot me with it…

      3 years ago
  90. I bought some pricy skin care products today! Exelent timing with your video! But I still need to get some sunscreen…for MY PALMS. Seriously, my skin tanns really easily and my palms are already noticably darker than rest of my body. It has been sunny these couple of days in Latvia and I like to walk to work.

    3 years ago
  91. People make fun of me when I use sunbrellas here in Vancouver T.T but I must protect my skin from the evil sun!! Also would love to have a dermatologist, but I’m pretty sure the prices here would just be ridiculous. Just another item on my to-do list if/when I visit Korea!

    3 years ago
  92. I’m from Miami and you kind of see both extremes because in some Latin cultures whiteness is praised because it’s supposed to mean you’re closer to European ancestry which usually mean in your home country you probably had a higher status. At the same time being tan here means you had time to go to the beach and is seen as a symbol of status. Also, I totally relate to your story Martina I was always wearing sunscreen on school field trips and people just kind of made fun of me, but I think people here tend to forget we live in the tropics and the sun is a death ray, which is why skin cancer is so common here, and sadly people don’t take it seriously.

    3 years ago
    • I live in MIami too- and I see plenty of people using sun umbrellas. And walking around in pants and long sleeves- but that could also mean they are better adjusted to the heat than I, who swelter when its 82 outside then pass someone in a flipping sweatshirt.

      3 years ago
  93. Tanning is big here in Utah but I am one of the ones caking on the sunscreen I burn quickly and it doesn’t even turn to a tan it just goes back super white again. If Any one laughs at my vampire legs I just laugh.

    3 years ago
  94. I use a skin “lightener” now but that’s because I’m old and have sun damage. I think maybe if they called it lightener instead of whitener, often they are called “fade” creams. I use one that has been around for years and marketed to African Americans. Black women I work with have used these products for years. Not to be white but to diminish the look of acne scars and even out their skin tone. I’ve been using one on my face and tops of my hands now for several years. I mix it in with my moisturizer even though you can buy it now with a moisturizer in it. I also use BB cream but BB cream in the U.S. hasn’t caught on and doesn’t have a skin lightener. It’s basically a tinted moisturizer with 15 SPF. I’ve started using an SPF moisturizer on my entire body every day now. I have no desire to bake in the sun and never really did. I do still have sun damage anyway. Believe me it makes a huge difference a few years down the road how much sun you get. You may not notice until you hit your 40s.

    3 years ago
  95. Here in Portugal is BURN! The toastier you look the better (or at least that’s what the majority of the population seem to think). You can find tanning salons very easily and the trips to the dermatologist are mostly made to treat/remove skin imperfections. Luckily for me, this year there have been more rainy days than sunny ones so people are whiter than usual. As a naturally pale girl (that’s been taking better care of her skin recently) i don’t feel like the white part of an oreo cookie whenever i walk around anymore XD

    3 years ago
    • it’s the same in spain
      After summer break everyone’s comapring skin tone to see who’s more tanned lol

      3 years ago
    • Oh boy, it is always the same thing around summer time in Portugal. Everyone going to the beach and turning into a lobster. I like the beach, I just don’t like getting tanned. Sunblock max protection for me. Of course I always get those comments “oh you look so white… are you sick? You should get some sun, it would be good for you” …. great thanks e_e

      3 years ago
  96. In England you see a lot of people going on holidays just to get tan, since sun here is a rare occurrence, however majority chose to use fake tan as a replacement which doesn’t usually look nice…actually it never really looks nice XD There are a lot of tanning salons but the don’t really look very busy so I’m assuming year there are not many people interested in that sort of tanning ^^ majority of people on the streets are just chalky white to be fair, unless their ethnic heritage gives then that olive skin for which people would kill for XD There isn’t really a standard of beauty linked to the skin tone since England since there is such a variety of ethnic backgrounds ^^ also, if you are really pale, It is absolutely necessary you have a suncream for that one day in the year when it’s actually sunny XD

    3 years ago
  97. i see MINHO~HO~HO~~~
    hehe i like Etude ads!!

    oh…i thought they really did have whitening products!
    when i was in Bangladesh on holiday as a kid i remember watching adverts showing how your skin will turn whiter if you used this certain cream or even soap, back then i just used to think ‘why don’t we have this this in England?’, not in a way that i thought people should use it, i grew up in one of the most diverse areas in England so skin colour was not something i first noticed of people (if that makes sense), i just remember thinking of it as an invention and why has Bangladesh got it and not England ahahah!!

    ZOOLANDER!!

    3 years ago
  98. Story time:
    For me living in the US being tan is a big thing but I don’t tan. To be honest I don’t do well in the sun or heat. I have to wear sun screen all year round and if I’m going to be outside for hours I need to have an umbrella. So for others to see this on the east coast its really weird. I get made fun of all the time because of my pale skin. Yesterday actually i decided to wear shorts and I had a bunch of people come up to me and tell me I need to tan. I guess my pale legs are blinding lol.

    3 years ago
    • Kat

      I KNOW! I get that too! Every time I wear shorts in the summer I have at least one friend that tells me I need to tan because I look like I have vampire legs.. but I don’t tan at all! I’m either pasty white or lobster red. No in between colors there.

      3 years ago
      • Concrete…If you live in the city it is pretty bad when your legs are the same color as the sidewalk….

        3 years ago
  99. Tanning now has negative connotations here… That’s because there was a big boom in fake tanning (since England is like a sun-less hole -.-)
    I don’t know if its just in England, but people who get really over the top fake tans usually have a “ew gross you look orange” reaction but that’s because people go over board with it (Google Essex fake tan and you’ll see.)
    But then it gets worse and some people (mostly girls) then get a bad name attached to them – “Look she’s got a fake tan, she must be a slut.”
    Which is awful really :/

    3 years ago
    • England is a sun-less hole??
      not for me the past few days!!!! i’m jumping under any shade i can find!!

      3 years ago
      • It has been where I live!! For no reason at all the sun has decide to skip my town -.-
        And you have to admit if we do get any good weather it doesn’t last for long X(

        3 years ago
        • oh….well then maybe it’s our areas!
          cos god i hate the summer!!! *comic book guy voice* WORST.SEASON.EVER!

          3 years ago
  100. OMG yay someone else who pick at there significant others face for pimples and what not Lol my boyfriend thinks I’m weird cuz I do that a lot

    I don’t mind going out in the sun but I like slather sun block on Cuz I tend to burn then tan and my mom always made sure I was protected by the sun I guess that explains a lot cuz my mom is from Korea and she always flipped out in the summer when I was younger never understood why until now

    She also but a lot of cream on her face she had like 7-10 different face creams and lotions it was crazy

    3 years ago
  101. try to live in Portugal! you can’t survive the summer without your friends ‘making fun’ of you because you’re not tan, when the school/college starts at september you only can ear ‘look how tan I am’ or ‘you look so tan, so pretty’ and comparing arms to see who is darker. the weather is changing so much that last year you could go to the beach at october so you almost look tan at christmas which is really weird ahah

    3 years ago
    • Agreed! I don’t g to the beach often during the summer (or care to) and every year its the same comment “Oh you look so white. You should get some sun. You look sick.” bllaaahhhh

      3 years ago
  102. So glad you guys talked about it because I was also curious. One thing
    you didn’t discuss though, which I’ve seen on lots of dramas is like
    that water in a bottle they put on their skin? I think it’s called like
    emulsion or toner? I also noticed they use like air purifier to moisten
    the air when they’re sleeping sometimes. I have a question though –
    maybe you could make another TLDR about this because no one seems to be
    able to answer it.
    WHERE DO KOREANS GO TO GET THEIR EYEBROWS DONE?
    I’ve heard that some just use those straight shavers and do it
    themselves and that they avoid waxing because it could cause wrinkles. I
    just want to know because I’m terrible at doing it myself and their
    brows always look so perfect!! Also is hair removal cheaper there than in North America?

    3 years ago
  103. I agree with you on the “you look sick, you should get tanned a little” comments from everyone XD It’s like there’s some kind of contest to get as tanned as you can as soon as the summer arrives. I’m from the south of Spain and I have fair skin by choice. That surprise people sooo much. Everyone asumes I’m pale because my skin is sentitive or that I get burned instead of tanned if I do sunbathing. Whenever I say “Nope, I tan easily, but I prefer not to” the automatic answer is “Wtf, WHY?”.

    3 years ago
  104. I live in Texas, land of the sun. Here, being a certain level of tan is considered “healthy” and “pretty” and whatnot. People always comment on how white I am. But I HATE being sunburnt, since I’ve had it quite bad before. I do not know anyone who uses sunblock on a daily basis. It’s incredibly uncommon. My mother never ever uses sunblock and tans
    pretty much every single day if it isn’t freezing outside. Luckily I use Korean BB cream (Missha) which has pretty good SPF in it. I wish the United States had more products like this that were actually somewhat beneficial to one’s skin.
    Even in Texas there are a lot of tanning salons. However, at least from the people that I’ve encountered, no one ever uses tanning beds since they are so dangerous. Spray tanning is still rather popular however. Although if discovered that your tan is fake, society here likes to frown on it.

    3 years ago
  105. I think most people guys and girls in the states just don’t know how to take care of their skin! You see all these acne commercials but half the stuff doesn’t really work. Besides that everyone has different skin types and skin issues. I don’t think most people are educated enough on their skin and what they can do. It’s also so expensive to go to a dermatologist! I’m sure if I went to Korea I would be obsessing over how bad my skin looks compared to everyone else. Being tan in the US is seen as a good thing. People think it’s weird when I apply sunscreen and I’m not going to the pool or beach. Being from a Hispanic background I can easily tan but I choose to stay out of the sun. People tell me I’m too pale but I’d rather be pale then get skin cancer or early wrinkles.

    3 years ago
  106. I agree with you on the “whitening” means – more white/caucasian when it comes to skin products. There isn’t a single Asian girl that I’ve met that didn’t want to be paler because it is advertised as the standard of beauty and every one of them would take great (and sometimes hilarious) lengths to keep the sun from ever touching their faces. I think that whatever Koreans Simon and Martina asked, were probably lying out of embarrassment to the two white people. Now, I don’t agree that whiter is prettier – in fact, I think it’s ridiculous, but to say that it’s not the goal/marketing of these creams (or the implied goal) is extremely naive.

    I think that part of the stigma with dark skin in Asia is historical in that there were African slaves/eunuchs in China and elsewhere in the 1800s-early 1900s as well as farmers/yokels/slaves that worked in the fields/rice patties all day and got very tanned were also looked down on by the big city gentry. But don’t quote me, I’m not an expert.

    3 years ago
    • Thank you for this. This is a nice/logical/clear/concise explanation and Phillipino-centric even which is where this conversation thread started. I couldn’t find any references to black slavery in Asia from a quick internet search but I’m pretty sure that if I dug out my university books on it, I would find it but you came at it from the other end which was likely even more prevalent.

      3 years ago
    • Field workers being sun browned is one thing, but please don’t assume that all Africans worldwide were instantly perceived as slaves everywhere they went. That’s a very Western and relatively recent mindset, in terms of human history. (Browse medievalpoc.tumblr.com for an interesting take on this.)

      3 years ago
    • But also (I had to add this in) whitening on Korean skin products does NOT mean skin whitening. I’ve used quite a few skin products from Korea that feature whitening (my entire routine is Korean, actually) and they do not lighten or bleach my skin. They do get rid of dark spots and acne scars, though, so my face overall looks “brighter” because it’s all one color (and a brighter, healthier color than the scars that were there before). I have also come across some skin cleanser that was whitening that made my face look paler/brighter immediately after using it for some reason, but again that was not bleaching my skin (it didn’t change the color, it just made it look like there was light inside of my skin) and it wasn’t permanent (I would run screaming in the opposite direction if these whitening creams were bleaching agents). From when I was in Vietnam, if you want a “whitening” product like you’re speaking of, they’re just labeled as “bleach.”

      3 years ago
      • I am a little confused. While “whiter skin” obviously doesn’t DIRECTLY mean “Caucasian”, aren’t Caucasian’s being held up in the ads as the pinnacle of “success”? Are there any WHITEr people than Caucasians except maybe Albinos and I’m not sure is anyone is holding them up as beauty icons (although there is something ethereal about most albinos and I could see this actually happening). I don’t know – I think to say that you want paler skin, while you may not want to be Caucasian, you may want to have been born with the same skin tone, how is this really any different? It’s kind of skin semantics, no? And also, to say that “bleach” and “whitening” are not the same is also wrong because, at least in English, the words are synonyms, whatever you are making paler. I agree that there are some skin products that add “luminosity” or smooth out your skin tone with colour “correcting” action, but 1) while these are not always the same products as the “bleach” products, there are a lot of products that do both, and 2) adding luminosity can be through light reflective ingredients but these are almost always – white! – because it reflects the most light so……….yeah. See what I mean?

        3 years ago
        • Okay, that *was* long. I said that it was “confusing” because that’s how I feel about it. You can say that “not all Caucasians are pale” but……..being pale is kind of what defines being Caucasian these days, whether you’re a hybrid of several ethnicities or “pure” somethingorother. I believe that I said that wanting to be paler didn’t mean that you wanted to change your ethnicity to Caucasian but you would like the same skin tone. Frankly, this is all whohah to me as I don’t really care one way other the other about skin tone (as long as mine is healthy) but not so far back in the past (like the 1980s, 1990s, and even into the 2000s) these “whitening creams” did indeed have bleach in them. Lots of people damaged their skin using them and that’s why you hardly see them any more. I can agree that these days MOST of the whitening products do not directly bleach your skin but give some of that effect however, if you go a step further and get chemical peels and such, you really are bleaching your skin. Since Korean dermatologist are so much more accessible and botox is more in the norm – and I’m pretty sure you can get this from a dermatologist – I wouldn’t be surprised if bleaching “professionally” isn’t also more common place. Plastic surgery is all FAR FAR FAR more common place in Korea than in North America so the lines of what’s convenient and common place are very different than over here.

          Cyber_3 – from one long-winded person to another, I think we both agree but just want to get the last word in now ;)

          3 years ago
  107. The tanning culture is very real in the states. I have a few friends who still use tanning beds (the coffin ones that are guaranteed to give you cancer). I’ll never understand that. But I’ll admit that because I don’t naturally tan, when I go to the beach I’ll slap on a boat load of self tanner before putting on sunscreen.

    3 years ago
  108. I’m from the Netherlands and having a bit of a tan is considered healthy here and having white legs or arms with shorts/dress whatever is kind of considered ugly quite a lot. So many people spend a fortune on tanning spray, tanning salons or spend hours baking in the sun.
    As for myself I’m really pale and people have asked me if I’m sick when I wasn’t and last year someone made a comment my legs can glow in the dark because they are so white. I take sun protection seriously. During summer or sunny days I always use sunblock with a high SPF as body lotion and apply a special face cream with a high SPF on my face and my normal face cream does contain a bit of SPF too. There is no way I go outside unprotected when it’s very sunny because I turn into a lobster very quickly. I tried tanning spray because people said I should give it a try but that turned me into a cow so I just stay pale and I’m happy with it. I also have a slight allergy to the sun so no the sun isn’t my best friend.
    Ohh and people always think I’m at least 7-8 years younger then I actually am, no wrinkles what so ever yet.

    3 years ago
  109. Here in the US, I have been having a problem watching YouTube videos because of a problem with Google Syndication (or something) . I did a search and found that Windows 8 has an Add-On that blocks Google. I added this block and now have no problems watching YouTube videos. However, I wonder if this block affects EatYourKimchi rankings as I am no longer shown by Google as watching your videos. I do not want to take the bread from your mouths. What should I do?

    3 years ago
  110. Heh – love the vampire sun – “Your star – it burns me!”

    The funny thing about me and skin care – I totally didn’t care most of my life. I think about caring a bit now that I’m in my 40s but….I’m lazy. My husband (definitely NOT a metro-sexual) really surprised me when we started dating because he has skin products and accessories (tools?) galore. See, he worked in a really industrial environment (foundry then powder paint coating plant) and that stuff will ruin your skin and make you itchy, etc. etc. so he exfoliates and creams, and soothes and sunblocks not just his face, but his whole body. I feel really ungirly next to him sometimes but he lets be borrow his expensive stuff so *marriage bliss!*.

    Now, my skin isn’t awesome, I have to at least wash it a bunch to keep it kind of clear but probably part of why I was turned off the whole skin care thing is that my mother’s family are all sun worshippers (in the 1970s sense). My Mom would be outside in Canadian winters sun tanning at least her face and hands and in the summer: it’s full body mayonnaise all day nudeness that, even though she has a smokin’ body, it really stank and turned me off the whole thing. At least the mayonnaise undoes the aging the sun has done to her skin but it seems like a constant battle. Her Dad also has had several melanomas on his head over the years due to heavy suntanning, even though he puts a facecloth on his bald dome but he doesn’t seem to care (just cut/burn/laser it off and move on). I sunburn very easily myself (totally fair-skinned) but I’ve learned that the SPF scale is more of a logarithmic thing so that using SPF60 instead of SPF 15 only gets you marginally more protection and yet has much more harmful products in it. I’ve started using SPF 30 these last couple of years and I’ve actually seen better results than all the years I used SPF 60-70. The Neutrogena non-oily formulas are excellent and they absorb right in. I will have to try that green cream, it looks interesting/useful.

    Having mole removal at that cheap price and convenience is awesome. I have a couple I’ve considered removing as I age but it’s minimum $300 per mole and you have to go through the whole doctor referral process, etc. etc. and that’s even if you’re suspicious that they are becoming irregular.

    Cyber_3 – can’t stand mayonnaise – 1 jar for Mom, 1 jar for sandwiches, which is which? You only know when you find the pubes in the jar – ewwwwwwwww!

    3 years ago
  111. To get tan is the biggest priority for many Norwegians during the spring and summer. As soon as the sun is up after 6 PM (yes, the sun sets at 3:00 PM during the winter) and the temperature gets above 10-13°C, it is an implied competition to get as tan as possible. The first opportunity after the winter is during easter break, when most Norwegians go to their cabins (not really a good English word for it) in the mountains to enjoy the first glimpses of sunlight (and go skiing, eat chocolate and read criminal novels, but that is a story for another time). Then after the easter break, everyone goes back to work or school with sunglasses tan-lines in their faces.

    3 years ago
    • …..
      This photo is lies. There aren’t stacks of money next to everyone. Why must you lie?

      3 years ago
      • This photo is (judging by the fashion and merchandise the people in the picture brought with them) probably from the early 80s. Oil money had not yet spilled over into the private economy. B-) Jokes aside: Tanning in the snow is an important part of easter break. The white snow reflects the sunrays and and thus make the skin tan more effective. It is becoming quite common to develop skin cancer among Norwegians lately with 350 people dying every year (and increasing). Especially in the age range of 30-60.

        So what are you Swedes up to during easter? No mountain trips or days of from work/school?

        3 years ago
        • Sun is good, sun is life. I once saw my old man neighbor out on his deck at 4 in the morning, trying to get tan by the sort-of midnight sun (it was just the glow of the sunrise). ._. And he was all naked, too!

          3 years ago
        • Oooh, that’s good information! I knew some of it so at least you were able to give that~ It’s sort of like that here too, but more up north and towards Finland. I have a friend who lives in the U. Her grandparents are all from Norway and she has pretty dark skin. Dark green eyes and black hair, too. Personally, I always associated you silly Norwegians with more darker appearances from all the coffee you drink. ;D Just kidding.

          Oh uhh, my family and I just try to do volunteer work and then eat a lot. c: Most people I know spend time with their relatives. They’ll have bonfires and yes, we go into the mountains and hills, too. There’s lots of cleaning to be done for people who go to their cottages.

          Wait–350?! Holy crap, calm down with the skin cancer! D:< Do it or we'll force another union and make sure you all stay more pale than Icelanders.

          3 years ago
    • Is there a hot spring just out of the shot? I’ve seen people in British Columbia skiing in bikinis but isn’t it cold when you’re not moving around?

      3 years ago
      • Same for Canada: -50° C in winter and +40° C in summer, but except for the mountains and the very north, no snow in summer…but as I look at the map, I guess that Scandanavia has both those things so that explains everything ^_^

        3 years ago
    • With our viking ancestry, snow feels like laying on a thick layer of marshmallows (room temperature).

      3 years ago
      • Why would I lie about something like this?
        http://www.tnp.no/norway/exclusive/2836-introduction-to-paske-traditions-in-norway
        Tanning, snow and skiing is an important part of most Norwegians’ easter holiday.

        “Another Easter tradition unique to Norway is the mountain trip, where Easter is celebrated up in the mountains enjoying the sunshine, skiing, and eating oranges and Kvikk Lunsj, a famous chocolate bar com prising of crunchy wafer covered with milk chocolate. The brown skin tone one gets after long outdoor days and sunbathing in the mountain air and snowrich environments, are often called “Easter brown” (Påskesol), while the increased traffic from the moun tain in the first and last days of the holiday is called “Easter traffic”. Also “Easter Lead” is a term usually used for skiing at Easter, when the snow is often old, rough and grainy, wet during the daytime and crisp in the evenings.”

        Yes, we enjoy warm summers in the south by the sea. It is usually between 20°C-25°C. It is the winter which is the worst. So dark and cold.

        3 years ago
        • None taken! English is not my first language, thus I sometimes interpret things wrong when written. :)

          3 years ago
  112. Im from Slovakia and i wear sunscreen even in winter because the sun pretty harsh in winter. And yeah, i look pretty pale. Usually people dont really notice it cause im often dressed up to my neck but when summer comes and i wear a tank top or shorst or anythign that exposes my skin, people approach me and ask if im sick or not feeling well and such (of course not complete strangers, duh, just when they are drunk)
    and oh my god beware that i wanna go swimmming! people will just stare or giggle or anythign becausemy whole body is pale, even paler then my face
    The girls here often look fresh and bronzy, wear heavier makeup or go to tanning salones in winter just to look “healthy and sunn kissed”. And that also counts for young guys. Oh and, SPF 20 is already considered as “high” and if you use sunscreen for everyday use, you are considered a pussy. I even have a bottle of SPF 100 from Neutregena for when i want to do sports outside is summer or such!
    I also noticed that the sunscreens I order from Korea are much better then any drugstore sunscreen or even expensive sunscreen form the pharmacy that i can get here!
    And when it comes to the dermathologist, people usually go when they have a problem like bad acne or scaring or skin pigmentation problems or if they have malformed moles. and of course for hair removal. I wouldnt say that its sooo very expensive but going 2 a month for a procedure can get on your wallet.
    But in all, people here dont think of their skin as much as they probably should. Once they get older and notice that their skin is damadged, women try to fix with a ton of creams(man after a certain age dont care at all :P ) but majority of people does not concider using sunscreen as an anti-aging product.

    3 years ago
  113. In Australia since we are so multicultural for those who do want tan skin, its either bake it or fake it. But the general consensus is a tan is healthy and pasty is bleh… Vitamin D deficiency? Id rather take supplements than take chemo thank you very much

    3 years ago
    • My biochemistry lecturer had told me that there have a lots of studies on vitamin supplement have a high likely hood of not working because most of it essentially get excreted from the body and do not go where you want them to go due to how the systems in metabolism.

      3 years ago
    • “Pasty is bleh” <– I used to get teased so badly in primary school for being pasty white.

      3 years ago
    • That’s because we get a higher concentration of UV rays down here. The skin health culture here has rapidly changed over the past decade or so. Its gotten to the point where there is now a fear of vitamin D deficiency (which can lead to increased risk of osteoporosis) because people are paranoid and wear sunscreen all the time. Parents of young children seem to be the most paranoid about skin cancer.

      I’m pretty sure almost all the tanning salons here have either shut down or are in danger of shutting down.

      But I’m sure there’s still a ton of young people who don’t give a crap and try to tan anyway. From what I’ve noticed my friends of Asian background apply sunscreen religiously.

      3 years ago
    • I live on the Gold Coast (a major beach city in Australia) and am unable to tan. Not to mention, I don’t even LIKE tanning! Even the beauty industry doesn’t seem to like pale people, as the majority of “pale” colours for foundations are for people who still like to pile on the bronzer or have the same colour skin as Big Bird’s (from Sesame Street) feathers.
      I have to order Korean and Japanese BB and CC creams from importers so that I can have both effective protection and a shade that goes with pale.

      3 years ago
  114. I think why it is not so common to go to dermatologist is it’s expensive you have to have good health insurance and I am guilty I only go when I have problematic skin. I suffer from a form of ecezma on my face dry patchy skin. As I gotten older in my 30s now I have a skin regime and i use more sunscreen then before bc my skin burns easily. Thankful for my genes and how i care for my skin i still get carded lol they think im still in my early 20s. People just assume going to dermatologist is key its also important to get your sleep and drink plenty of water which is good for your skin and your skin regime.

    3 years ago
  115. I’m from Canada and was thinking about getting laser resurfacing done for some old acne scars. $500 dollars a session at my dermatologist. Asked my Korean friend how much it cost for him to get it over there and it wasn’t even $100. The only negative thing I heard about getting procedures done in Korea is that some people will try to overcharge foreigners.

    3 years ago
  116. For men in the States, I think the culture has for so long held up rugged heroes as the ideal male type, cowboys, cops, soldiers, often working outdoors with a tan and with some sort of facial hair- that American male beauty hasn’t really been equated with poreless, glowing, dewy soft skin- so guys don’t think about it much for themselves. Seriously I can’t think of one that had great skin, maybe Elvis, or maybe because that kind of skin makes you look young, and leading men in American films are usually older than their costars. Pretty is the job of the girls.

    3 years ago
  117. I’m part Mexican but white-looking, so I tan really easily and almost never get sunburned. I don’t worry about skin protection, because there’s no history of skin cancer in my family, and being tan is considered attractive here in the U.S., so why bother? I do find that people of Asian descent here tend to have unusually healthy skin, so I can only assume it’s a genetic thing that’s exacerbated in Asian countries thanks to cultural emphasis on skin care.
    Random question: Do people in other countries have “skin tone comparison contests”? I don’t know what else to call them. Basically, something in conversation that indirectly or directly relates to skin color will trigger a bunch of people to spontaneously compare their skin tones. Everyone sticks out their arm and compares, like, “Oh, you’re darker than me,” “Wow, your skin is really light,” etc. I wonder if this is an American thing because of all the racial diversity, or if people in other countries do it too.

    3 years ago
  118. I love that you showed those comparison photos of what celebrities really look like compared to what they look like in magazines. I work as a package designer for hair appliances and I see how much models get photoshopped for our packages. Not only is their skin “perfected” their hair is cleaned up, goodbye split ends and fly-aways. Their hair is made fuller, softer and don’t even get me started on how much their hair color is changed. I’ve even seen a models body altered to be skinnier and smoother. Every photo out there selling or promoting something has been altered in some fashion and I really wish we could all stop comparing ourselves to them. Actually since I work in this field I stopped a long time ago.

    A few months ago this video came out and I think everyone should watch it. Four women see themselves turned into cover models and how they feel after seeing the end result.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zRlpIkH3b5I

    3 years ago
  119. I’m from the US, where even my family pokes fun at me for being pale because I prefer healthy skin over being tan. I wore a cosplay last summer that had a bare stomach, and I realized it was probably the first time my stomach had seen the light of day since I was about 10 and owned a little-girl bikini. :P Much sunscreen was worn at that con!

    Apart from sunscreen, I own just about zero skin-care products (aside from oil-removing pads). I’ve always thought of them in the same way that we think of the dermatologist here — only something you need if you actually have skin problems.

    3 years ago
  120. Skin care? We have two sorts of people here. Sunbather and nonsunbather. There was a time when looking like a leathercouch was supposed to be cool. But most of them were the less educated. Its a fact.

    We have free healthcare here (we pay taxes for this) but it starts getting more and more like america so that a lot of people have private insurances. So they go to private doctors. Why? Because private doctors normally do more, have time for you and you dont have to wait. I am one of the mix-people. I search for the best doctor and visit. Doesnt matter if its private or public. If its the best its the best.

    But one thing do all our skindoctors have in common: every thing they do costs. Yes they will check your moles for free but removing costs. And not just ten bucks. Make it like 80-100 euro for 1 mole!! It only costs between 20-40 euro if its threatening.

    Oh and good skincare products? Not to be found or rarelly to be found. When i was in australia i was stunned how much careproducts there are. Here you have just a few regals and thats it. And its expensive. A normal cheap mascara costs 15 euro. A make up remover thats for sensitiv or allergic skin costs 20 euro. So you see skin care did totally go by. Dont know why. I get all my products from other countries because i have allergic skin and no product from here will fit me.

    3 years ago
  121. Oh, I WISH men were more careful about their skin here because great skin is very attractive to me. I remember my ex’s skincare consisted solely of using this horrible astringent toner that BURNED when you put it on (“That’s how you know it’s working”). It was far too harsh and drying and he had these dry patches, not to mention acne scars and huge pores. He refused to moisturize/wear sunblock and claimed his leathery-hide-of-an-excuse for skin was a mark of masculinity and he didn’t want to “be a woman” and do skincare. Paradoxically this was a guy who used to buy lip gloss from Bath and Body Works for himself to wear.

    My current boyfriend, on the other hand, will use any skincare product I buy him and occasionally steals mine (I CAN SMELL IT ON YOUUU).

    My friend uses the 10 cent razors from the convenience store, shaves with just water, and complains about how much acne (this is a guy in his mid-20’s) he gets on his chin. I keep telling him it’s because of the razors! He works at Microsoft and he could afford $300 razors if he wanted–he gets $50 haircuts every other week and buys expensive clothes! But he would rather be scabbed and pimply than spend more on stuff for his actual body.

    Anyway, most guys I know would not do anything for their skin (even if they had the $$$ to do so) unless they had horrible, oozing, cystic acne, in which case they pick up some Proactiv.

    3 years ago
    • I read about that recently…I think they have linked that with a bacteria present in the human intestinal tract but some people are genetically predisposed to have higher concentrations which can lead to stomach cancer….Something like that…I’ll see if I can find the article again….

      3 years ago
    • I don’t think that cheap razors can cause acne. You might get ingrown hairs or irritated sweat glands on your chin from cheap/dull razors and using just water though and that’s very similar to acne. You should tell him that even a cheap double blade (Gillette/Bick) and some Noxema instead of shaving cream would be awesome on anyone’s skin and not cause “girly” stigma ;)

      3 years ago
    • Cheap razors can cause acne? O.o

      3 years ago
      • Cheap razors (plus my friend’s crappy shaving regimen) irritate the skin/follicles through razor burn and introduce bacteria, which can then result in acne. Plus he had some acne before to start with, and then he ends up slicing his pus-filled pimples open, resulting in somewhat of a ripple effect around the original pimple. Yum!

        3 years ago
  122. Ah yes there is a lot of obaasans protecting their skin in Japan the same way they do it in Korea. Sometimes they look a bit scary with their face covered…
    I always feel out of place when I’m wearing my t-shirt and they have their umbrellas, etc… I wear sunscreen when I know I’m gonna be long time in the sun because I might get red, especially my nose. But I’m not that used to do it I guess because in Finland the sun is not that deadly since… winter is dark and all. And I just don’t go out that often. XD Sucky thing is that I do want to protect my skin but sunscreen is kinda sticky and those arm sleeve things seem hot… I sweat more than Asians so no can do! OTL
    Funny thing about tanning though. As a kid I wanted a nice tan but as I got into visual kei and saw those beautiful men with milky skin, I wanted to have one too. My dad still keeps saying every summer to me that I should go out and get tanned and I’m like NO!!

    3 years ago
  123. I’m a girl from Poland (cześć) and I started taking care of my skin when I started listening to kpop and getting into korean culture. I went to a beauty salon (?) and got my face cleaned and the lady told me to what kind of skin type I really have etc., but I didn’t really know or care about it earlier.
    People in Poland go to dermathologist when they have a real problem with their skin, but I think going to beauty salon to have your pimples popped is quite common, especially with teenagers. But sunscreens? SPF face creams? Not very common in daily use. And as for tanning – usually after summer holiday people would talk about it, but it’s not a thing here…

    3 years ago
  124. Hi from Australia! here all through school they hammer Slip Slop Slap (Shirt, sunscreen, hat) but asides from my sister and I know one i know does the sun protection thing. We love our beaches and sunbaking (frying) too much. Apparently tho scientist recently discovered that the sun on skin produces endorphines, which means you can legitamately be addicted to the sun! Oooh let me hop in the sun and get my fix~!
    But look now you can Drink!!! your sunscreen. Eeeww?

    3 years ago
  125. I had a really funny encounter last year with some korean exchange students from Seoul and Busan. They asked me where they can buy these kind of sleeves Simon and Martina are talking about here in Germany. I told them that this is a korean thing and something like that isn´t available here. They were so mind blown and shoked and didn´t believe me haha. You should have seen their faces, really it was hilarious…its really a funny story….

    3 years ago
  126. People in Japan too are definitely more aware of skin health than back home in the States. Tanning is definitely a no no. Even on hot days I see people walking around with jackets on to cover up their skin. I’m not sure if people in Japan see dermatologists as often as people do in Korea. I’ve definitely seen a lot of acne though. I wondered about products with “whitening” on the label. Thanks for clarifying ^^

    I’m always amazed by the vast number of skin and beauty care products in Japan/Korea. I just wish some of those products would be sold in the US. BB cream, for example, is really lacking in the US. I’m quite pale so even if I buy the lightest shade it is too dark for me. The last time I went to Etude House they gave me a bb cream sample to try and halleluiah it was like the perfect fit for me. I’m really going to miss skin care products here OTL

    3 years ago
  127. I wish visiting the dermatologist was cheap here in the States. I can’t even see one because my family’s insurance doesn’t cover it. Instead, I have to consult with my doctor about my skin.

    When I was in Korea this past summer, I was so self-conscious about my complexion since I had so many crater-like acne scars and everyone had nice skin. I’ve become more consistent about having a skin regime though, thanks to Korea. But being from America, being tan is still the trend, even amongst my Asian friends.

    3 years ago
  128. I live in America and I think a lot of people here, especially guys, don’t really care so much about their skin. I don’t know anyone who goes to a dermatologist unless they have an issue, and I can only think of 1 guy who takes care of his skin! (Happens to be my boyfriend, lol. He tries to take care of himself, which I think every human being should, male or female. I spend way longer on skincare, but at least he uses face washes). As far as sunblock, I refuse to go outside without sunblock at least on my face. I tend to wear jackets all the time, so I’m pretty much covered. I also rarely go outside xD But I’m the only one in my circle of friends/family that will put sunscreen on every day, even if it’s cloudy.

    3 years ago
  129. Since my eighteenth I’m wearing sunblock with SPF50+ PA+++. Yes, I’m bloody pale because of that, but I don’t mind. Since I’m protecting my skin from the sun, I’ve had less acne and my skin looks better and healthier overall. And as you guys mentioned: my face won’t look old and saggy when I’m hitting 35. With just putting on some sunblock every day you can make so much difference. It’s not a hard thing to do and you’ll be grateful in the future.

    3 years ago
  130. My best friend was born in the Philippines, lives in Texas- and whenever she returns to Cebu for a visit her grandmother gushes about how beautiful it is that she is so pale. During the visit the grandmother has someone following her around with an umbrella to make sure that she doesn’t get any darker. I don’t know if it is a beauty standard or a class standard- she doesn’t want her getting dark because it is considered less pretty or because you only get dark if you are poor enough to have to work outside and theirs is a well-off family- but its definitely a generation thing- her mom and dad don’t care if she gets a little browner in the summer, but it freaks her grandmother out.

    3 years ago
  131. I’m an Asian American from LA and honestly didn’t think about protecting my skin from SUNNY DEATH RAYS OF DEATH until college. In high school I would never wear shorts because I had such pale skin and my classmates would tease me about being unhealthy or having “engineer’s tan”. My mom on the other hand, made me shower in sunscreen, because “cancer! bad skin! wrinkles! SUNNY DEATH RAYS OF DEATH!”. So it might be a cultural thing, where one culture values the “healthy, tan” look and another values…health? haha
    Thanks for doing a tl;dr on this! I think it’s time I really put some effort into nicer skin.

    3 years ago
  132. We’ve got plenty of orange faced people here in the UK, and you used to hear about so many people having an ‘addiction to sunbeds’.

    3 years ago