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What Stereotypes Do Koreans Have on Foreigners?

June 27, 2013

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Hay guise!

For starters, let’s just start off by expressing our hesitation to do topics that don’t paint Korea in the greatest light. This is why we spend far too long in our videos giving multiple disclaimers, rather than just freely talking about what’s on our mind. Yes, we know that a lot of you Nasties here on the blog are really cool people who really understand us and what we’re saying, and won’t think that we’re vile scumbags for making this video, and so you’re not as likely going to get offended. But there are also new viewers of our videos, viewers who won’t know the kind of people we are, and who will possibly take things out of context. Videos on sensitive topics like this have more shareability than, say, videos about how we lost weight, you know? It’s these new viewers need disclaimers, not you guise. Correction: new viewers and Tumblr, even though we know that there are some corners of Tumblr that can’t be salvaged, regardless of whether we put in 1 disclaimer or 100. We’re overflowing with white privilege so we need to get social justice policed. Got it. Let the reblogging begin!

Now that our disclaimer on disclaimers is out of the way, let’s just say how uncomfortable we were with this topic, frankly because we’re worried that people might fear coming to Korea because they think everyone will perceive them in one of the ways we discussed in the video, which is totally unfair to say. No matter what country you go to, there will always be racism and stereotypes. Every country has its own cocktail of beliefs. No one is safe from being misperceived.

That shouldn’t be a deterrent from you visiting other countries, though. Just like how it’s not fair to say that everyone acts a specific way, it’s also not fair to think that everyone in a country thinks that everyone from another country act a specific way. We’ve met loads of really cool people who don’t share these beliefs, loads of cool people who we’ve made lasting friendships with, and it’d be a shame if fear of the bigotry of a few soured the chance for you to experience the awesomeness of the many, you know?

Some of the stereotypes we discussed in this video we didn’t actually hear about until we started researching the topic and asking our friends, so it’s not even like these stereotypes are universal. What one friend suggests another has never heard of. The ones that affect us, though, we could talk about more comfortably, like the Russian Saram solicitation and the perception of being unqualified teachers and sexual deviants. I remember back when we were still teaching and making videos, we’d read comments about us on Korean sites about being unqualified to teach, and “losers” that couldn’t find jobs in Canada. The idea of foreign teachers being “losers” is one that we read a lot, not only about ourselves but also about a lot of other teachers. That seems to be a common phrase when describing foreign teachers. We’d respond like “Unqualified to teach? Losers? I got my Bachelors of Education! I’m qualified to teach!” I didn’t really know how to respond to being a loser, though. What can you say to that? “I’m not a loser! You are! BOOYA!” And then high-five myself and leave. That taught em. That taught em real good…

Also, there were a few stereotypes that we couldn’t really discuss to any greater depth apart from just basically listing them, like the perceptions of people from Malaysia, the Philippines, and China. These are stereotypes that we haven’t actually experienced, nor do we have friends here who experienced them. We were just told about them. If anyone wants to add to these – in a civil way, of course – please do. As for what our black friends have experienced, we can only relay that to you from what they’ve told us, and what we mentioned in this video was corroborated by a few different people we know.

Side note: I just remembered this old video we did, which is relevant: Russian Saram?

I’m sure that there are a lot more stereotypes that we didn’t mention. Don’t even get us started on perceptions of Japan and Japanese people. Whoa. Now there’s a sensitive topic that demands the utmost caution in wording. I’m sure some people are going to ask about prostitution in Korea now after Se7en got caught at a Rub&Tug: another topic that’ll be difficult to handle without offending people. Anyhoodledoodlepoodle, if you don’t mind, we’re gonna get our shotguns and put our backs against the wall for the next few days. Soo Zee will get back to translating the angry Korean comments we’ll get on other sites. Spudgy will guard the door. Teeeeeeaaaaammmmm BREAK!

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What Stereotypes Do Koreans Have on Foreigners?

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  1. What about Hispanics? What are SOME korean’s views on Hispanics?

    6 months ago
  2. I spent two years in Korea as an American soldier. I made a lot of friends, both local nationals and expats. However the occasional bigotry was upsetting. What was even more upsetting was the attempt by non-military American expats to separate themselves from the U.S. Military as the “other Americans”; the ones who cause trouble not us. It’s an unjustified stereotype that American G.I.’s are out of control violent sexual deviants. We’ve had by far the largest continuous foreign footprint in Korea, and have had maybe 15 to 20 major inceidents over a 60 year span. Those inceidents were tragic, but area hardly representative of the military community in aggregate. The stereotype is relatively prevalent nonetheless, even among non-military Americans. I was often told that I “wasn’t like other G.I.’s”, which often promted the question, “How many soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines do you know?” More often than not, the answer to that question was akin to, “honestly, only you.” Chances are however, they did know a few military personnel, and just weren’t aware of it. I, and a few other G.I.’s were “English teachers”, or “bankers”. I personally “taught at YBM”. It’s unfortunate that the unjustified bigotry was so prevelant that we had to have a separate identity, even for our non-military compatriots. I’m now out of the military attending university in NYC. There are many military veterans attending CUNY schools. Many of those veterans served in Korea, most of them had positive experiences, and many (including myself) plan to return to Korea as tourist and as residents. I can only hope I can change views of U.S. service members has a civilian. An upside to my experiences of discrimination in Korea have been that I cannot only sympathize with victims of bigotry, but I can now empathize as well. That experience has also made me a more vocal opponent of bigotry in my own country (which has recently become a serious problem). My hope is that citizens, and residents in both the U.S. and the Republic of Korea can come to accept and even embrace those who are “different”, and bravely confront bigotry wherever it may be found, and in whatever form it might take. The world, and the people in it are far to vast and interesting to be foolishly overshadowed by hateful ignorance and suspicion.

    11 months ago
  3. I worked closely with a Korean woman for about 2 years and found many of the stereotypes to be accurate. The sad part was I grew up watching a WWE-style world view, and was a little dismayed to find that she was very devious, shallow and a poor driver. The up-speak was also a huge problem because I never knew if she was asking, or telling me something. I’m a fairly common American working man, and was shocked on how offended that she was when I called her new husband a “decent fella” (which is a solid compliment around here). More-so, the other Koreans in the location came across as the “all talk, no action” type when it came to anything escalating as well as being the first to show off a new car or some gym muscles. Bottom line, I’m glad left that dump!

    2 years ago
  4. I think the reason he thinks your rich is because in korea they majority of people live in apartments and a farm is huge to compare to an apartment. A way to tell him u aren’t rich is if you explain that in the us that is not rich but a hard life

    2 years ago
  5. Apparently it’s quite a popular thing to discuss among young Korean men durinv military service…”riding the white horse”. Like I said in my comment above, my boyfriend is Korean bit he wants nothing to do with this kind of talk. However, I will say it’s quite interesting to see older Korean men’s reactions to both my bf and myself when we’re together at a company outing or whatever. My bf’s company directors would normally mot gove him the time of day at the “end of the year party”, but last December he took me with him and literally every high ranking person from his company (& many people lower than hkm) came over to greet us (aka “oogle at the foreigner”). They even pulled me up on stage and (even though I can speak Korean) forced me to answer personal questions in English so that the MC could should show off his English skills. Smh…. white horse? More like side show attraction.

    Don’t get me wrong, I still love Korea…faults and all.

    3 years ago
  6. How do they feel about South Asians?

    4 years ago
  7. Kim

    there are people that sweat but they don’t smell i think it due to the lack of hormones or something.

    4 years ago
  8. wut

    when there was an article about an american lady sticking with his boyfriend after his loss of arms and legs in iraq.
    koreans believed that this is something only americans can do(also criticized korean girls…anyway)
    so don’t worry plenty of south korean love and respect america and americans.

    4 years ago
    • Oh, yes- I heard about that. It is definitely assuring to know that though… I mean, it would be pretty intimidating to be given the stink-eye everywhere you go!

      4 years ago
  9. “I remember back when we were still teaching and making videos, we’d read comments about us on Korean sites about being unqualified to teach, and “losers” that couldn’t find jobs in Canada. The idea of foreign teachers being “losers” is one that we read a lot, not only about ourselves but also about a lot of other teachers. That seems to be a common phrase when describing foreign teachers. We’d respond like “Unqualified to teach? Losers? I got my Bachelors of Education! I’m qualified to teach!” I didn’t really know how to respond to being a loser, though. What can you say to that? “I’m not a loser! You are! BOOYA!” And then high-five myself and leave. That taught em. That taught em real good…”

    I don’t think these comments should hurt or offend you because they don’t know you in person… those are just mean remarks that started with lack of information and fear of the unknown.

    I agree with what you said that every country has its own perceptions on foreign people… I can even say there are prototypes among my own people…

    I’ve seen different movies… seen music videos… that don’t quite represent foreigners in a favorable light… Of course not all people are like that but… people tend to believe those things until they are proven to be wrong…

    Love you guise!

    ♥♥♥♥♥♥

    4 years ago
  10. i wish you guys would do more “korean like a pro” videos! they were funny!

    a lot of this stuff is really similar to Japan… and i can relate to a lot of the interaccial dating stuff. though i think Japan might be a bit more forward on this point. there are soooo many white dudes married to Japanese women, and i don’t know any who have ever gotten yelled at by old people…. but the white-girl/j-boy combo is still a lot rarer… and in a lot of cases we are still not seen as “wife material” and mostly as being “easy”. although i know a handful of girls who are married to japanese guys, so it is starting to change too.

    and yes! no deodorant! god! why!!! although the “no stink” part is not really true… it just takes a lot more for them to start sweating/stinking… have you never had a class come back from P.E. and really really wish they had deodorant in this country? or gone to a concert where you are huddled with a million sweaty young people? trust me…some of them smell.

    but anyways, this was a good one, and i think you guys did a good job at remaining mostly PC for the whole thing! well done!

    4 years ago
  11. I have all my older friends tilling me to go to Korea and find a Korean Man. Props for being a forign girl but i don’t want to just date i would rather marry you too.

    4 years ago
  12. ” homosexuality is a disease ” … every time I hear this, I get annoyed. Every time someone says that I just say: ” go back to school ” or ” it seems your biology knowledge is decreasing ”

    This was an interesting video, since stereotypes will always be there -.- not to mention racism..

    4 years ago
  13. wow. thats crazy. I know I get the ignorant ish from other people but my parents on the other hand are very supportive of what I choose to do.
    I admit my mom was upset with me because I told her I wanted to move overseas and study in Japan but now both my parents are happy that I know what I want.
    my sister was ignorant at first too and but now she thinks its cool. I just finished college and now I’m trying to start planning out my goals so I can go to Japan.
    So don’t worry I’m sure that your family will eventually come around to the idea of you living in Korea and traveling. Frankly I understand because traveling to new places has so much to show and teach a person culturally.

    4 years ago
  14. i wonder how i will survive in korea?! i am a C cup (no big deal or problem) but i have 42 inch (106.7 cm) hips that will be the death of me in korea. :*(

    4 years ago
  15. Martina and Simon, you talked about racial stereotypes, but what about gender stereotypes?? I get the feeling that Korea is still very patriarchal, so what’s their attitude towards foreign women? I remember you talking about how Simon would be acknowledged but not Martina… is it different if you’re single?? Thanks for this TLDR ^-^

    4 years ago
  16. The whole we don’t like America thing has more to do with foreign policies carried out by the American government than with actions of individual Americans. it does not help that America has been so influential politically, economically and culturally in the world and that such influence came at the cost of erosion of traditional values in many countries.

    The interesting thing that I have encountered is that many people from most countries like Americans, the people, but dislike the country as a whole and this dichotomy is true among both Europeans and Asians. I’m a Korean now living in America and when I go back to Korean I often encounter Koreans who dislike America as a country but somehow still love hanging out with Americans because they are cool and fun.

    As a Korean male, I can fully attest to the whole riding the white horse thing. Many Korean and Japanese men have fantasies about white women, especially ones with blonde hair and blue eyes so hooking up with a white woman is viewed as a exotic and special achievement. This tendency is not as prevalent as it used to be just because there are a lot more Caucasians in Korea now but you can still see it.

    4 years ago
  17. Ah sterotypes. Unfortunately the sterotype about Caucasian women having big breasts and bums isn’t true in my case. Sigh.

    4 years ago
  18. This was a really nice video though i almost choked at the “white privilege” thing, why would someone just say that, tumblr is just i don’t know… even Grimes got crazy tumblr hate for expressing her music choices, oh well you cant win ’em all and also i think this viral TED talk video from this lovely author will help http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9Ihs241zeg maybe sharing this will help beat stereotypes and negativity it actually makes a lot of sense.

    4 years ago
  19. Ermagerd! Im not from an Asian country but the misconception of the super duper rich white thing is the same in my country too, the same damn thing! Even the morality angle yup no country is perfect indeed.

    4 years ago
  20. A question for next week:
    What is some of the things you find most frustrating about the Kpop industry? Is there situations you suffer from epic facepalms?

    4 years ago
  21. Kim

    just wondering if there is any stereotypes about australians?

    4 years ago
  22. I’ve met a lot of Americans who do that (for whatever reason) and it just makes me feel stupid (because I don’t know where that particular place is) :/

    So, personally, I wouldn’t recommend it; but if your safety is at stake, maybe just say another country. My dad’s had people hold machetes to his neck and ask, “Are you American?” I wont say what country it was

    4 years ago
    • zsc

      Blink once if it’s a “bad” part of Hawaii. My mom worked on a cruise ship that stopped there, and was immediately told where NOT to go (We’re American).

      4 years ago
    • But that is usually what i say if someone asks me is Alabama (cause it is true) and don’t feel bad, i bet most of those people don’t even know where other states are themselves.

      4 years ago
  23. what do S&M mean with korean think abt philippines n malaysia saram??

    4 years ago
  24. I wonder if there’s any stereotypes about Australian people?
    Is it the same reaction with how they see Canadians?

    4 years ago
  25. I’m from Alabama, and trust me they don’t know where it is lol. The only states my students knew about were California and New York, usually.

    4 years ago
  26. I am so glad for this topic finally got addressed, I never been to Korea; but i do intend on someday going and working there. But in my 6 years in Sydney i have has exposure to some of these Racial stereotypes.
    I am Sri Lankan by the way, so Brown guy most of the time mistaken for Indian or Nepalese or Mexican.
    But some of my best friends who are Korean, got off on the wrong foot.
    At first they didnt want to talk to me, because they thought i was a day labourer.
    Or a factory worker. And this was followed on by the next most racist thing i heard being “My you speak such good English”

    4 years ago
  27. Stereotypes about russians are always so rude and silly. It’s really irritates sometimes.
    We’re nice!BOOYA!=)))

    4 years ago
  28. When I studied abroad in Japan last year, I was asked twice if I was Russian (though I am American with eastern European roots)! I asked one of my Japanese guy friends who originally thought I could be Russian why this could be and he said it’s because of my fair skin and light brown hair.

    After watching this EYK video, it made a lot more sense where this stereotype is coming from XD Whoa!

    4 years ago
  29. As a Korean I agree with ‘ust some korean’.

    “If someone asked Korean a question about first impression about Germany, they must say “oh! diligent, great car, good at soccer, great beer AND GERMANS APOLOGIZE FOR THEIR ACTIONS DURING WWⅡ UNLIKE JAPANESE!!!””

    This is so true hahaha.
    And koreans who have traveled Germany usually have good impressions, so that helps too I think.

    4 years ago
  30. We’ve met loads of really cool people who don’t share these beliefs, loads of cool people who we’ve made lasting friendships with, and it’d be a shame if fear of the bigotry of a few soured the chance for you to experience the awesomeness of the many, you know?

    I completely agree with you there. I mentioned in my other comment that I’ve experienced a lot of stereotyping, and racism, in a lot of countries.

    But I’d also like to mention that besides the polar opposite groups of narrow-minded racists and open friendly people, most people are in between, having misconceptions of other cultures just from a lack of knowledge, INCLUDING ME. If I wanted to avoid such treatment, I’d end up a hermit.

    So I decided to be friends with people of different cultures – not only the open-minded cool people who don’t have strange beliefs, but also the ignorant racist people. I was ignorant of, say, Basque culture, until I met a Basque guy and made friends with him. If he had gotten offended by my stupid comments and avoided me, then I never would have learnt anything. Instead, he was patient with me, corrected me when I was insensitive, and helped me become a more understanding person.

    So: If you have the guts, try to make friends with ignorant stereotyping people; and prove them wrong ^^b

    On that note; thank you Natz for being friends with me. I never knew anything about Barbados until you came along <3

    4 years ago
    • Lols. Trust me, before Rihanna very few people even knew Barbados existed. I remember when people used to ask me if it was a part of Jamaica and whether we had cars and roads and stuff. I remember a joke about a Bajan telling people that we lived in trees and wore grass skirts… And people actually believed them.

      I have always been the sort of person to make friends with people who came from a different background to my own. My best friend from secondary school is a Sai Baba devotee Sindhi, my first friend in college was a white girl from Ohio who had an adopted black sister and brother. One of my closest friends is an animal rights activist, vegan Jew. All very different from me but we spent a lot of time learning about each others cultures. And when one of us was mistaken or ignorant of something, we would teach each other.

      Thanks for being friends with me too. We learn alot from each other.

      4 years ago
  31. Thank you for the confirmation!! :D

    4 years ago
  32. Say hi to the Aussie dude for me :p

    4 years ago
  33. I love this video!! Thank you S&M, my parents were nodding the whole time. Even though my parents are almost 60, they still get asked in the taxi, “Which hotel do you want to go to?” whenever they go to Thailand; because the taxi drivers just assume that my mom is a Thai prostitute whom my Australian dad is just hooking up with for the night. When we lived in Indonesia, my mom used to carry around my sister (who looks very white), and people would always ask her, “Where’s her mother?” – assuming my mom was a maid. So my mom totally sympathised with Korean girls who get looked down on when they date white guys. :(

    Funny thing is; I’ve been on the receiving end of a LOT of stereotypes, because I’m of mixed heritage and I’ve lived in about 10 countries. When I’m in Australia, they either assume I’m Asian, American (and suffer for it), Canadian, Chinese, Indonesian, Japanese, Thai, Filipino, Indian, Middle-Eastern, or Danish; but never Australian. In Indonesia, they assume I’m Australian, American (and get death threats for it), Chinese, Filipino, Arabic (and benefit from it), Taiwanese, or just White – and then all the guys brag that they’ve slept with me or some crap. In Thailand….well I’m just one of those bastard kids right….yea I don’t like being in Thailand. In Japan, they’ll generally settle with me being Australian, but some people think I’m from Okinawa, which is quite a compliment. In America, I was Chinese. Etc etc.

    Ah, another topic that I’ve found interesting when moving around is body hair. I never shaved my legs when I lived in Southeast Asia because noone else did (they didn’t need to), but my genetics gave me, well, hairy legs, and guys used to yell at me from the side of the road, calling me a gorilla :'(

    Speaking of stereotypes, a while back I saw this video with accurately represents a lot of the stereotypes on America. Even though I identify with a lot of those countries, I found it really funny! Check it out :D

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QYcjMEg1Pm8

    4 years ago
  34. Haha I remember telling my co-teacher where I went to university and what I studied and she was like “well then…what are you doing here?!” *gasp* you mean I actually CHOSE to teach in Korea?!

    As for the Canadian/American thing I actually found the opposite is true? My boyfriend’s Canadian and I’m American and Koreans usually tell me how awesome America is and kinda just ignore him…but maybe that’s because it’s a younger crowd? I’ve had some taxi adjusshi’s that didn’t like Americans but that’s it.

    I’m not sure if this is a stereotype but many Koreans seem utterly shocked when I speak even a little Korean. Because I’m white I can’t learn a new language? I live here too! But they are usually very nice about it. I could just say “안영” and they would say I speak Korean well.

    Anyway that’s my take. Very interesting topic.

    4 years ago
  35. That actually sounds horrible D: Even without them knowing what they were saying I would feel slightly bad and embarrassed if that happened to me.

    4 years ago
  36. another meaning for white horse. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8j2ej5jqQw

    4 years ago
  37. If you set your flow from Newest to Best it’s the second one day I think. :)

    4 years ago
  38. I used to be very self conscious because of the stereotypes and thoughts about African American women. BUT now I still want to visit Korea, and like S & M said there are stereotypes and racism everywhere. I guess it will have to be an experience for me and my fiance because we are both African American and dark skinned lol!

    4 years ago
  39. This made me think way back to high school biology and our lesson on genetics. One day my teacher called on me because well why lie I so was not paying attention in class and asked me “If a black rabbit and white rabbit have a baby, what color will it be?” Being my smart ass self I replied “Gray” which got the whole class laughing in an uproar. I looked at my teacher and said “My mom is white (German/French heritage), my dad is a hispanic man with a very dark completion, My skin tone is somewhere between those two shades. I think it is very plausible a black rabbit and white rabbit will have a gray baby even if science says the black gene is dominate.” He giggled, told me that was a great answer but next time to pay attention in class. BTW I somehow managed to find the answer in my book will giving him this shpeel.

    On a side not, I do have a frustration that I get lumped in the category of hispanic only. I love celebrating and embracing the cultural differences between my two cultures. Southern white and hispanic, because I was told once “Oh you’re families that kind of white.” *face palm* haha Stereotypes, racism really is everywhere.

    Okay one more. I have a Korean friend, here everyone calls her Chinita, spanish for Chinese girl. She’s embraced it but always clarifies that she’s really Korean. Awhile back though she came to me and said “I always correct people that I’m Korean, but lately I let them believe I’m Chinese because I don’t want them to think I’m one of those crazy Northern ones.” And I could honestly understand where she is coming from.

    4 years ago
  40. I like how they have the whole “riding the white horse” thing and yet they say foreigners are the perverted ones xDD

    4 years ago
  41. Just wondering. I’m vietnamese american. Is there a stereotype for vietnamese people in South Korea? Thanks for replying !!!

    4 years ago
  42. my country doesn’t really have stereotypes about others country’s, but i think others country’s have a lot of stereotypes about my country, which is brazil, where all women are hookers and we only have beaches and soccer, which is really sad because we have so much more.

    4 years ago
  43. My friend said it is the same in Japan

    4 years ago
  44. I’m just curious about “Russian Sarram” Why Russian specifically? Is there a back story for that?

    4 years ago
  45. KT

    What about Hispanics? I am really curious about that

    4 years ago
  46. I was gonna ask the same question >_< what about us australians ???

    4 years ago
  47. Even though it made you two uncomfortable, I really enjoyed this TLDR. Anyone who gets mad at this, is ignorant. Even the taboo can be educational.

    4 years ago
  48. I finally know why GD and TOP were laughing their asses off when Seungri said he wanted to be a white horse, and GD said he would ride him. THOSE NAUGHTY BOYS!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gl4AqW-Ven4

    4 years ago
    • Pffffffttt hehehe huehue …that was Hilllarious.
      (saw that once before but didn’t get the hidden catch at that time:P)
      & this serious face till the end while they R almost turling on the floor… OSCAR

      4 years ago
    • I’m dying when I saw TOP and GD lose it at 0:43. It all makes sense now. Naughtyyyy. Hahaha!

      4 years ago
    • Aww… TOP stopped laughing when GD said “I want to ride you” to Seungri. jealous much? LOL. i ship both gri and gtop tho, so whatever’s just fine ;D

      4 years ago
    • HAHHAHA! That’s so awesome. Thank you for sharing :D

      4 years ago
    • Nic

      OMG it all makes sense now.

      4 years ago
    • Puhahaha GD’s laugh killed me. I’m so used to his badass rapper persona these days, sometimes I forget how adorable he can be in person! XD

      4 years ago
    • I still don’t get it. especially in this context….

      4 years ago
      • Funny, in America when you say “Riding the white horse” it usually means the person is a cocaine user.

        4 years ago
      • He’s saying he wants to be white, not black ( and not a panda ), and GD said he wants to ride him. “Ride the white horse”.

        4 years ago
  49. I won’t be able to watch your guys videos no more T.T Join you guys on your Livechats and everything :/ I only will be able to watch them days later at my boyfriends house..I won’t even be able to do college homework I might even just be every day at my boyfriends house ..My dad is cutting off the internet..No more internet tomorrow for me :/ I’m gonna dieeeeee :/

    4 years ago
  50. My Moms side of the family is Canadian, and my Dads is American. I prefer to identify with the Canadian roots, especially when traveling. I get a lot of grief from USA people who are like, “You’re like an Expatriate! You’re ashamed of this great country!” But there’s no reason for my to hide my Canadian side either!
    And I’m like, “Dude, people hate ethnocentric Americans, okay? Maybe that’s why I don’t want to go to another country and brag about it.”
    I don’t personally hate America or anything, and I’m not trying to be like “This country sucks!”. But I dislike the way some people act (especially in other countries), and that I’m seen in the same light even though I don’t know those people. I get really offended when I see Americans doing racist or stupid things to other people, so I rant a bit about it and I’m trying to hold back. (hahaha)

    Anywho!
    That was one of my concerns with interracial dating because I felt like that’s the way it can be. It’s cool to DATE a Korean guy, but getting married (depending on the family) can take it to a different level.

    But my thoughts when it comes down to it are the same. All countries think stupid things about other people that are usually wrong. And that not all the people in the country feel that way. We all think differently when it comes down to it, and where we are born shouldn’t make a difference in how we see people or how people see us.

    4 years ago
    • Do you live in America or Canada? What area of America do you visit/live? I feel like Americans are stereotyped as racist but I feel like a lot of that stereotype is fueled by other Americans. I live in Michigan, about 25min from Windsor, Ontario. I live in a very diverse area. In fact, in my neighborhood, out of 13 houses, only two are white families, the rest are Indian and African. Down the street is a Christian church and Mosque right next to each other. I feel so fortunate to be in a area that is so diverse. VERY rarely do I see any form of racism. In fact, I come across sexism more than racism.

      4 years ago
      • I can agree that sometimes the stereotype is fueled by other Americans. And like I said not everyone from a country acts a certain way. I’ve lived a few different places and when I was in California I saw a lot of people who were racist towards people who were from Mexico. I had several friends whose parents worked hard to make a life for their family in America, and people called them border hoppers and all sorts of terrible stuff.
        I’m in Colorado now and in the more rural areas (Not Colorado Springs or Denver as much) it can be about 90% white population, without much diversity (I miss that from CA). I’ve seen racism, sexism, and other things happen while living here.
        Granted that in both places they weren’t to an extreme, and I’m not counting everyone from those states or the USA, but I did see it often. (Maybe I was just around the wrong crowd and wrong areas)

        I think the rich and kind of mean American stereotype was formed from the tourists that traveled honestly. I went on a cruise for a wedding once and most of the other people on the boat were pretty rude to the staff and other guests. I met a lot of nice people as well, but I could see the stereotype they talked about in this video being pushed a bit by the people there. (Being loud, self-centered, and really wealthy.) It’s kind of difficult to really express my feelings and tones in text though, ya know? I don’t want to come off as like really angry or hateful or anything like that. I’m just being honest about what I’ve seen a lot of personally. >.<
        When it comes down to it there are countries that don't like America (sometimes for good reasons). I really just wish that people didn't see Americans in a bad light though because there are so many nice people that I know from America (and Canada)! But I think it's up to us (any Westerners who travel or will travel) to show a different side to people and help reverse some of the more negative stigmas over time. :)

        4 years ago
        • My family is not rich or wealthy but I’ve been fortunate enough to travel to 24 different countries and I’ve always been really polite to people and try to learn the language and immerse myself in the culture. It wasn’t until I went to China with a tour group for Americans only (first time I ever traveled with a tour group) that I saw how some Americans can be rude. I wondered why some of those people even wanted to go to China. They acted like they were better and everyone else was diseased or something. They even treated my father and I like we were low class people. They didn’t show me any respect until one day I got a vendor trying to sell them stuff they didn’t want to leave them alone by speaking Chinese and telling the person that they weren’t interested. Like as if I said magic words, the vendor apologized and left immediately. After that they didn’t treat me like I was so beneath them. But for every rude American I believe there are 10 awesomely polite and respectful Americans. I really think the region of America plays a role. I am from Michigan which has many diverse areas in the lower peninsula and I rarely see racism. My brother lived in Alabama for 5 years and said the people were nice down there but really racist too. They didn’t believe they were racist, but they would say stuff that would just never fly in Michigan.

          4 years ago
        • Kim

          I find that when people go to other countries there is a minority of people that will act as though they should treated like a king and if they are not treated as such they start getting really rude and would say things that they would never consider saying if they were back home. They treat everyone like they are of low class and think they are better than everyone and forget that when they are traveling that they are representing they’re own country and people take that as a reflection of what there country is like. You see this if you take up jobs like a waiter. I’ve had friends that are waiters have people get really rude over really simple things like the country they are going to does not have the food they have back home and then use awful language and threaten them. You just learn over time to ignore these people and just be respectful to other people when you are traveling so next time they might have a better impression of you and your country.

          4 years ago
  51. “I didn’t really know how to respond to being a loser, though. What can you say to that?” Pfft guys this easy. You can’t be a loser if you boldly picked up and moved to another country on the other side of the planet to teach in a country were you know little to
    zero of the language being spoken. That is one, or this case two, very adventurous, brave and daring souls, no sign of a loser there. ;)

    4 years ago
  52. i was wondering, are there any stereotypes for desi/south east asian people? or are there not enough in s.korea to have an opinion on them?

    4 years ago
  53. No one in south Korea considers Germans as nazis.

    Japanese conservative politicians often say something very insulting korean like sex slaves who kidnapped and raped by japanese soldiers during world warⅱare just prostitutes so Japan doesn’t have to apologize or make compensation for what they did to sex slaves.
    And we Korean know Germans are really sorry for What nazi did to Jews.
    Korean compare germans who apologized for nazism appropriately with japanese people who didn’t apologize appropriately and even say something supporting imperialism and war.
    So Korean doesn’t think of Germans as nazis.
    If someone asked Korean a question about first impression about Germany, they must say “oh! diligent, great car, good at soccer, great beer AND GERMANS APOLOGIZE FOR THEIR ACTIONS DURING WWⅡ UNLIKE JAPANESE!!!”

    4 years ago
  54. I’m really curious about stereotypes about Muslims/Arab Muslims. I know there are SO MANY stereotypes about/bad feelings towards them everywhere, but I’m curious about how it is in Korea. A friend told me some Korean people thought Dubai was in India and they thought they were Indian..

    4 years ago
  55. Howdy from the deep south. My question is, how Korean looks/treats Half-Korea? I ask because I’m half-Korean and will be living in Korea for 9 months.

    4 years ago
  56. Wait… So If you are seropositive they will not accept you as a teacher ? O_O
    Accidents exists … :O

    4 years ago
  57. That should work for me when I tell them I’m from New Mexico – heck, a lot of *Americans* don’t realize it’s in the USA! I have a ‘New Mexico Passport’ as a joke, but I should bring it with me! — http://amzn.com/0962551546

    4 years ago
  58. white women have big boobs and butts? and that’s a negative thing? I wonder what they would have to say about us black women lol. In America it seems the black community (or any colored community) take pride in a woman having curves. Maybe that has to deal with the whole “child bearing hips” thing…

    4 years ago
  59. Sorry if it posted twice

    4 years ago
  60. This kinda makes me worried of what people will think of me once I go to Korea to live with family friends during collage.
    Are there any stereotypes you guys have heard specificity about Germans? I am of mixed race my dad being African American – Hispanic and my mom Caucasian with Chinese in our family history, I’m am German born and raised in the US and Germany. I have been mistaken for korean by every korean I have meet, which is allot because I grow up in a neighborhood which was predominantly korean/American families . I have never understood why they all say I look korean because personally I don’t think I do. Do you guys think I will be seen as weird? Do you think people will have a problem with me because I’m German? Do you think my appearance and partially growing up with the korean culture will help me fit in better? Will they look down apron me because I am from a former U.S military family?

    4 years ago
  61. My husband is Korean too. And at some point, I just had to research the sweat thing because it was so baffling to me. The answer is that there are two kinds of sweat glands–eccrine and apocrine. Only the apocrine glands produce fatty sweat that bacteria love. When bacteria feast on it, you get the stink. Some lineages (lucky Koreans!) have very, very few apocrine glands and, therefore, little smell. I have also noticed a different sweat pattern. If I’m really hot, I’ll sweat the most from my underarms. But my husband sweats the most from his head.

    4 years ago
    • I was actually tilling my Korean friend about this where they don’t really smell like most white people do. I didn’t word it that way but he was like thats so racist. I told him whats racist about it, it’s scienticaly proven. That Korean people sweat differently then White people and etc. He didn’t believe me until i showed him proof and he was like ….. wow I do wish i never had to us deorderint it’s so annoying.

      4 years ago
    • omo! So I don´t need to feel as much disgusted with myself now ;) I was in Japan last summer, and yes..summer…it was so humid and hot. I´m usually a person that is very like..cool, I don´t sweat to much. But that didn´t work over there. Me and my friend usually stood up when taking the subway because we didn´t want to offend anyone with our sweating and smelling.

      4 years ago
    • Thanks! You just explained my son’s odd ability!

      4 years ago
    • Nic

      Yeah from the head sometimes! My husband sweats from his hands sometimes and I know other guys who will sweat from their feet a lot too…. but never the bacteria stinky sweat that we get….. sigh haha.

      4 years ago
    • ._. That makes sense. Perhaps it also has to do with weight; when I was super thin I didn’t smell at all. Then I gained a bunch of weight and started getting a little smelly when I sweated :'(

      4 years ago
      • That’s not always true either. I’ve always been skinny, but my underarms can smell REALLY BAD if I don’t have proper protection. It’s just the underarms too, cuz I’ll generally sweat everywhere but it almost always starts with my underarms and they do stink. It’s also difficult to find a good anti-persperant/deodorant that works. I used to use clinical stuff, but after a few months, my body would get used to it or something, and I’d have to buy another brand cuz it would ENTIRELY stop working on me o.O I eventually gave up and bought the cheapest anti-persperant/deodorant there is. Been using it for months with the same okay results, which is better than working one day and completely failing the next .___.
        I also know fat people who sweat like crazy but don’t smell at all…

        4 years ago
        • First off, I’m curious where you got the idea that sweat is ammonia (you should rephrase your sentence if that’s not exactly what you meant). Sweat is mostly water with some minerals and a few other things, and even then, ammonia is only a byproduct of the apocrine sweat glands, which are only located on the scalp, underarms, and genital areas. The eccrine sweat glands, which cover most of the body, don’t produce any ammonia.
          Second, lying? No, you must’ve never experienced it then. I really do know fat people who don’t smell even if they’re quite sweaty. They probably just have fewer apocrine glands. But if you don’t believe me, whatever xp
          For your own sake, please do some research before commenting ~.^

          3 years ago
        • I was in the same position, but try spray deodorant. I use suave and it is much more effective, You sweat, but not alot at all.

          4 years ago
    • Finally someone answered it scientifically!

      4 years ago
  62. Thanks for making doing a tl:dr on this topic! I’ve often wondered if South Korea would break my heart if I ever managed to make it over there, even just as a tourist. I’ve read some blogs where people have said that Koreans tend to be nicer / kinder to foreigners who are tourists rather than those that travel there to work, study or live. Of course there are terribly rude and inhospitable people in every country and it wouldn’t put me off visiting Korea. However there’s a difference and that is that I’ve kind of fallen in love with it, through Korean Entertainment. Of course I know my understanding of the Korea is therefore very skewed but nonetheless I want to visit the place to see for myself what kind of place it is, how the people and culture are. I’m learning the language, culture and history and so in a way I’ve raised the stakes higher than any other country I might visit.

    It’s akin to unrequited love; being rejected by a people, a country that your heart really wants to like because it has fallen in love with the idea of being in love with it. If you get what I mean. It’s not just the fact that I’m from a South Indian continent / African descent but the fact that I might just be too ugly too. Oh yeah and I smell too, hehe. There’s always that niggling thought at the back of my head, in the pit of my stomach and in the loneliest part of my heart, that those actors / entertainers and celebrities that bring me so much joy and laughter might actually regard me as nothing of any worth. I just want to see for myself, what Korean people are really like, first hand and hopefully without any prejudice.

    Anyway, even though your experiences are of Caucasian, Canadian people
    who are tremendously beautiful too, heartfelt thanks for sharing
    because I don’t want to be naive in my expectations. Will my fears stop me from travelling? Nope! Will South Korea break my heart? Maybe…maybe not! : )

    4 years ago
    • Sabah, I haven’t seen your picture and I don’t need to. I want you to know that you are beautiful. And I relate to your feelings. I’m going to Japan and I am overweight and a part of me is so scared they will just think of me as a fat ugly American. But you, and myself included, have to realize that you mustn’t criticize yourself like that. You have to realize that you are beautiful inside and out. If someone in Japan wants to ignorantly think of me as all those negative things just because I’m overweight, then that is their problem and not mine. Last year I lost a lot of weight that really was life changing. I still have more weight to lose, but one of the things I learned is that I need to own what I am. Meaning, you need to have confidence in yourself. I used to never wear lipstick cause I thought it made my full lips look like fish lips. If I wore lipstick it was pink or nude and 9/10 times I would wipe some of it away to dull the color. For the first time I bought red lipstick last year and wore it to a wedding and decided I was just going to own the look and you know, I felt fabulous and people there thought I looked fabulous too. :)

      4 years ago
      • Elizabeth! Firstly sincerest thanks for your kindness and generousity. I am much obliged. Secondly I just wanted to applaud your efforts and success, not just in losing weight but you’re acceptance of yourself. It reminds me of Raven who replied to a journalist who told her that she looked beautiful after losing a lot of weight, ‘I was always beautiful, now I’m thin!’ Kudos to you and I’m just so overwhelmed by your fighting spirit. Wishing you much happiness and success upon success!

        I have this fear that Korean Immigration won’t let me into the country for not being beautiful by Korean standards. I laugh but I can’t deny that the fear exists. hehe. Of course my locus of self worth isn’t located outside of myself. Living with PCOS or as I like to call it, ‘the ugly disease’ I’ve been pushed to nurture my soul more than my outer appearance; you can’t manufacture inner light nor buy it in any cream. Still in this society, beauty is deemed important and I’ve lived my whole life in its shadow so to speak. Watching a documentary on the victims of Chernobyl as a teenager insured that I never became bitter over my lot AND I only ever met one guy that made me ungrateful, for the smallest moment that I hadn’t been blessed with outward beauty. So if Koreans or Korea reject me, of course I’ll get over it. It’s just I really want to fall in love with them! hehe. Let’s just say, it would be a disappointment.

        Thank you for your support AND you truly are fabulous! : )

        4 years ago
        • It is a struggle everyday sometimes to be motivated. Sometimes I look in the mirror and think “I have a really beautiful face” and “I’m looking good today” and other days I look at myself and think “I look very thick”, “I feel ugly”, and I feel like none of my clothes fit comfortably. I’m a high school teacher and sometimes I’ve heard students make mean comments about me behind my back. It’s been rare, but hurts nonetheless. I have to remind myself frequently that people love me and I’m not as lonely as I sometimes feel. Right now I’m trying to meet someone and my biggest problem is that I reject the other person first before they can reject me because deep down perhaps I feel like I’m not good enough. I don’t know how to get over it completely. I’ve been told, “what’s the worse that could happen? You have a bad date?” I suppose you just have to put yourself out there, accept that you might be rejected, but also acknowledge that you will probably be accepted more than you ever thought you would. So I’m staying positive before Japan. I’m certain I will run into more nice people than not so nice people. And if they say something mean then I will amaze them with my Japanese when I stand up for myself :)

          4 years ago
        • hehe, yeah I understand where you are coming from. Still I think you have an amazing attitude. It takes courage to put yourself out there and even more courage not to let others’ negativity bring you down. I also get the whole ‘pre-emptive’ strike thing in regards to rejection. One thing I truly believe though is that you can’t protect yourself from hurt without protecting yourself from feeling deep passion either. One of my favourite lines from the film ‘rough magic’ about love, “the trick isn’t having the courage to risk your heart, but having a heart to risk!” Granted I barely know you but I think you’re wonderful and I think you’re going to blow them away in Japan! Wishing you the very best of everything and much, much happiness!

          4 years ago
  63. I really liked this video! :) I find it funny that the question about if a person with dark skin goes into a pool will the color come off.

    I’m half Caribbean and half Nicaraguan (central America) so my skin tone is pretty light, kinda caramel-y. When I go back to the islands people think if I go in the water, go in the sun, and go in rain my color is SO light that it will wash or dry off. They are a lot darker then me so they tell me that their color will stay. It just makes me laugh.

    4 years ago
    • What part of the Caribbean is that? I am from the Caribbean and have never heard that before. But then again, my country has a full range of shades, tones and colours so people are used to very light skinned people. I have black friends and family members who have lighter skin than some of the native whites ( because they are naturally very tanned).

      4 years ago
      • St. Thomas. I mostly get it from my extended family and the neighbors of the neighborhood.

        4 years ago
    • Ya XD so it’s not only a Korean thing.

      4 years ago
  64. I’m married to a Japanese guy and living in Japan, and … the “we don’t like you” thing Koreans have with the Japanese is mutual. When I asked him what he has against Korean people: “Because they don’t like us”. And while I see tons more reasons for the Koreans not to like the Japanese, this just sounds like kindergarten to me.
    We totally have the “Are you Russian?” thing as well, I was asked once even though I have dark hair and dark eyes…

    4 years ago
  65. ahahaha this was a funny tl:dr!!! some of the stereotypes are just hilarious!!!

    in England (from what i’ve sometimes personally seen, especially since i have a ginger haired friend), some people think people with ginger hair are dirty and gross and look at them as if they weren’t a normal human!! like i don’t get it….it’s a freakin’ hair colour!!! sheesh!!!

    4 years ago
  66. So sad that I fit into some of those stereotypes that Koreans have of Americans. Ugh! Simon, Martina – are there specific areas of S. Korea that are “more racist” than others? I’m assuming the bigger cities have less racism/stereotyping because they see more Americans/foreigners, no? Another side note from waaaay back when (I was in the military) – I had friends who had been stationed (in Japan I think) who encouraged me to go overseas to that area to model because the people there were so enamored with blonde haired, blued eyed,(pale) white skinned women. It doesn’t seem like that is true anymore given your post though. BTW, LOVE the video!!

    4 years ago
  67. Yep, my hubs is Japanese and has NO BODY ODOR AT ALL (his breath is another story, we won’t go there) but being a stinky white girl kinda sucks. yeah.

    4 years ago
  68. Oh, and a European stereotype that I noticed:
    If you are european, you automatically speak/understand every european language.. I was asked to translate everything from spanish to italian to german to finnish to estonian and icelandic.

    4 years ago
    • lol, its more common for someone in Europe to know 3+ languages there. Mostly cause i guess they’re all so close and italian, spanish and Portuguese, & french are similar so those 4 workout. . Heyy that doesn’t mean EVERYONE there can, i know lots who can, and can’t. just more common in that area.

      4 years ago
  69. After I moved back home from Korea, I reaised that it’s not that Koreans don’t smell, it’s just that everything in Korea smells like Kimchi – including the people. This was especially clear when my packages from Korea came to my home a few months after I moved – they smelled like Korea! And so did the Koreans. you don’t have to wear deodorant when everything smells the same.

    … I however, was a stinky poo :(

    4 years ago
  70. Funny you mentioning some of the racial stereotypes outside of “westerners” because I feel like they exist in other countries too. Like I remember my penpal from Taiwan mentioning something similar to the whole “the Chinese don’t bath” thing. I just remember her complaining about how she hated when her parents would make visit China because it was dirty. Now that I am older that seems weird since technically Taiwan was part of China.

    I am glad you mentioned very super briefly about Japan. I know a lot of countries have a lot of views about them. I live in the US, and am American. In college I had a friend from Hong Kong. One day I was going to his apartment to hang out and I just remember him pulling me over and warning me that his roommate was Japanese. I had to explain to him that American’s didn’t have any stigma against Japanese people in the same way Korea or China does. It is pretty complicated, which is why I find it odd that Korean entertainment is doing so well in Japan.

    4 years ago
    • Totally with you on the Hallyu wave in Japan, so befuddling. I had a friend from Hong Kong who also labeled China as dirty and untrustworthy. I definitely think there’s tension between regions of Chinese origins, be it political or ethnic. She considered herself Chinese, but was quick to emphasize Hong Kong Chinese.

      On a side note, thanks SM for mentioning Se7en. I was really curious if it was a big deal in Korea as I kept seeing so many international sites talk about it.

      4 years ago
  71. Whenever I travel to Europe I just say Mexican, people seem nicer if I do…..b/c whenever I say American I get the stink eye and they start complaining about the US overall: politics, religion, parenting, anything and everything…

    4 years ago
  72. Simon and Martina, I did see what you put on the blog, and Japanese people vs. Korean people. The stereotypes here were just overwhelming. Since I am Japanese and American, it just makes me feel scared. I know I shouldn’t be, but I have always wanted to go to Korea to explore, (maybe drop by the EYK studio), eat food, and maybe audition for a singing company (which probably won’t happen, but you never know), but my mom is 100% Japanese and she talks a lot about bad things about Korea. I know somethings aren’t true, but some are for instance the history between Korea and Japan was just horrid, BAD, AWFUL. Now, my mom is getting into Korean culture and food (which is good), but I am just afraid of visiting to South Korea and getting shunned for being a race I did not choose. I mean, I don’t want to sound mean or anything, but Japanese people also look down on me because I am American, and they shun me. They don’t shun my mom, and my brother because they look Japanese. My dad is tall and looks European and they like him. I just feel weird, and out of place in this world IN GENERAL. I do want to visit South Korea, but I think the stereotypes would get to me. Same goes for Japan.

    4 years ago
    • momo,

      You really don’t have anything to worry about.
      A lot of Japanese tourists visit Korea each year; they don’t have any problems.
      Koreans are welcoming to tourists and guests.
      As long as you don’t say something that’s really really offensive to Koreans, you’ll have absolutely no problems.
      (Even if you do, most likely they won’t lay a finger on you.)
      It’s not like Koreans in Korea go around hunting Japanese.. >.<

      As for Koreans' perception of America, yes there are a few who don't like America.
      But on the whole Koreans have a very positive view of America.
      (surveys prove this.)
      They very much value the Korea-US military alliance.

      If you're a Japanese-American who's into Korea, Koreans will probably think you're cool. :)
      Koreans really like it when Japanese are into Korean food/music/culture, etc.

      So yeah, do feel free to visit Korea at any time.

      4 years ago
    • Hi :) *random person coming in*
      I’ve never been to Japan or Korea but really, I don’t think you should focus on negative people, or people with prejudices no matter the place. Because this way, you’re gonna miss all of the awesome, open, nice people that you’ll meet. Believe me, there’s tons of people that are nice and open-minded everywhere !
      I, too feel out of place in this world, but when people reject me for whatever reason (where I come from, my appearance, anything really…) It doesn’t affect me anymore because I truly believe that they are the ones with a problem, I mean, why would you reject or shun someone because of their appearances or nationality ? xD
      I just find it stupid, and I never ever ever adapt myself to people like that.
      Of course, everybody make mistakes, none of us are free of prejudices, but what’s good is that everyone can change their opinions and views about the world..So if you show who you truly are, then you’re gonna be the one who changes (in a good way) other people’s opinions and views..We are all human after all ^^’

      Don’t worry, I’m sure you’ll meet tons of amazing people!

      (Sorry for sounding so cheesy, but that’s truly what I believe! xD)
      (and sorry for my english too, I’m french)

      4 years ago
      • You don’t sound cheesy, and your English is perfect!
        Je ne’parle pas francais. Je parle anglais. :)
        Anyway, I think you are right, you gave me courage to travel, but I am still nervous about the people that are negative. There is a chance that I would meet kind people like you said. Simon and Martina met a lady that gave out cheese and Simon and Martina were accepted by her. Maybe because they can speak a little bit of Korean.
        Maybe if I learned Korean, I might be accepted more.
        Anyway, thank you!
        Merci Beaucoup!

        4 years ago
  73. It’s funny because a bunch of people are asking about Hispanics/Latinos. And I wanna know too. WHAT ABOUT HISPANICS/LATINOS?? And is it only Caucasian girls when they date a Korean male, people in Korea think its cool. Or is it every foreigner that’s a female dates a Korean male and people think its cool. I just want to know. I want to know about the stereotypes on Hispanics. But I also want to know why is it kind of bad if you are a foreigner and say you are from America. Didn’t America help S. Korea?

    4 years ago
  74. Russian boys are prostitutes too? xD Thank you for this TL;DR, I love learning about cultural differences. And BTW, not everyone drinks vodka every day, bears can’t be found on the streets, balalaika is practically an ancient instrument… Just saying.

    4 years ago
  75. well Simon and Martina, I don’t know how to say this but… IT WAS SOOOOO AWESOME! I laugh a lot everytime you were extra cautious to not hurt somebodies feelings and that was what make it funnier. Keep it up with awesome revious like this one. I wonder how portuguese community are seen in Korea but it’s kinda dificult to know because we are a country with very little population and there isn’t many portugueses interested in Korea or asia (I think the first choice would be Macau or Japan because of historic events).
    In portugal all asians for us are chinese, i can distinge a little because of the dramas and k-pop but everyone here when we see a asian person we say they are chinese automatically xD
    Anyway beijinhos e abraços (kisses and hugs) for everyone of EUK! :D

    4 years ago
  76. Im curious if anyone knows how red hair/gingers are seen in asia? My boyfriend’s family all thought it was weird and asked if they could touch it lol. I know in america i get made fun of a lot for it. Would it be even worse in asia? -_-

    4 years ago
    • Thanks for your response! I was curious if it would be more shocking to them because I can imagine we are even more rare to see :P And don’t worry it would never discourage me from visiting, there is too much I want to see!!! ^.^

      4 years ago
    • Just my two cents based on nothing more than my thoughts, I don’t think red-haired people would be treated differently from other foreigners. Seeing as many Asian people like dying their hair red/orange might just make them think that you dyed your hair. But then again, I’m not a red-head and I’ve never been to Korea so who knows, there might be some negative aspects of it. I just think that red-haired people would just be lumped with other lighter-than-black/dark-brown haired foreigners as to how they’re treated. Hopefully someone will give you a better answer with more concrete examples.

      4 years ago
      • Thanks for replying! I’m happy to hear your two cents! :P I can imagine a lot of people would just think it’s fake/dyed like you said an not take much notice of it. I’ll have to wait and see when I get there. ^.^ Hopefully I wont stick out even more than the average foreigner hahaha XP

        4 years ago
        • If you’re going soon then I wish you happy traveling and hope that you have fun :)

          4 years ago
        • Oh, I wont be leaving for another 2 years yet… I need to finish my degree first before I can have fun and travel TT.TT But I’m sure I’ll have a wonderful time when I do go! Thanks!!!

          4 years ago
  77. It’s hard to believe that Korean women that date white men are looked down upon…..most of interracial couples there are between Korean women and white men not so much the other way around.

    4 years ago
  78. HAHA, the video only scratches the surface. Try white guy MARRIED to Korean woman. You would not believe the number of times I had some old lady say I was there for a taste and looking to leave. Toss in 3 BIG brother-in-laws, a sense of family and community connection we don’t reach in the West and oh those first years were hard. Now I’m over 10 years and still in the family.

    Keep up the good work Simon and Martina, there’s so much more to explore, have fun with and talk about in Korea. BTW, did you ever get to Jeju? My lesson was to stay at the beach, it would be interesting to see what both of you would find.

    4 years ago
    • Wow 10 years! And with 3 BIG brother in-laws! Mad props dude!

      4 years ago
      • Yes, 6 foot is the shortest (I’m glad to be taller than one). Korean mandatory military training also just does something for the tradition of older brothers testing out the perspective husband of a little sister. Thankfully, spicy peppers, work him until he drops, and see how much alcohol he can hold appear to be culturally universal. The bladder endurance drive in the country was a new twist and a challenge which told me they have limited use of “Big Gulps” in Korea. (Actually, it was so hot I sweated out any liquid that came within 3 feet of me when we first met. Yes, I did likely stink…) At least I can say they valued my wife enough to try and I did endure these and other challenges. Three things I can note that they appear to still believe when I visit. 1. I cannot go outside alone, much like a dog I need person to walk me so I don’t get lost or into trouble. 2. I alone can sleep in a room with a fan, as the North European fur covering my body protects me. 3. I have money, because I frugally won’t buy designer labels no matter what store they take me or how great the discount. (I will pick up the family dinner bill though.) In general I can say having Korean family is pretty awesome over all of this.

        4 years ago
        • Sounds a bit intimidating! Though they are looking after their sister and that’s nice. After a while I think you’d be fine walking around alone! Haha they see you as a hairy beast! XP

          4 years ago
  79. Omg sooo true! I have stuck my face in my boyfriends armpit and nothing!! Then he wants to try and i run away in fear of killing him!! TT.TT i want the no stink gene asians have!!!!!

    4 years ago
  80. Wow this vid helped clear up alot of things :) thanks guys “I’m riding a white horse” BAHAHAHAHA

    4 years ago
  81. I live in California. -_-‘ The place where people seem to think we always see Brad Pitt just chilin’ in a restaurant everyday and where we’re loaded by the billions. =P

    I’ll just say I am from Vietnam. :D

    4 years ago
  82. Is the lack of body odor because Korean people have less body hair? Even when they keep underarm hair, it looks less than someone European or South Asian.

    4 years ago
    • Maybe it’s because they eat a lot of vegetables (saw this on AskAKorean). And kimchi has a lot of probiotics which, okay, I’m just throwing this out there, keeps digestion and general health in good order, which would reduce the need for toxic body waste via underarms. Just a theory.

      4 years ago
    • That paired with the fact that Koreans are so homogeneous, that they’ve had centuries to adapt to climates there.

      4 years ago
  83. I’ve found that often stereotypes exist for a reason, not simply out of xenophobic(trying to use the nicer word here) ignorance. Here is America a lot of people assume all Asians are short (obviously that’s not the case), a number of people in America still believe that all Muslims are extremist terrorists, Black people can’t swim and are all incredibly dangerous gangsters. Spending time with those who view you in a stereotypical way, will often help to hasten the dissolution of those stereotypes.

    Oh man, the Japanese thing really is a touchy subject, most of which probably still stems from their occupation of Korea for the first half of the 20th century, I’m actually a little surprised there isn’t even more hatred toward Americans and Russians too. After the Japanese surrendered during World War II Russia and the US were chosen to handle the defense while Korea tried to re-establish itself independently. Korea was divided at the 38th parallel, Russia in the north, and the US in the south. It always seemed likely to me that Communist Russia influencing the north, and Republican America influencing the south, led to a division amongst the Korean people, and eventually leading to the Korean War and the divide we see today. I suppose that’s enough History and conjecture for today.

    Thanks for trying to bring a lighter side to the more serious issues.

    4 years ago
  84. I’m about to pack up my fanmail package…should i throw in some deodorant too?

    4 years ago
    • Really though, what do you guys need from the states vs. Candy and fatty fat fat snacks? I’d be more inclined to send packages if you really need the stuff. And I would say you can never have too much cupcake stuff/stickers, but I’m sure by now you’ve probably had more than you could have imagined… Plus I’m a ranch addict like Simon, and I’ve seen tons of new ranch flavored things, that I’ve wanted to send!

      4 years ago
  85. sounds like koreans are very ethnocentric, bigoted, youth and beauty obsessed hyper consumption culture. maybe because they were very poor up until 70’s.

    4 years ago
    • Remember the disclaimer, Not Everyone is like this in Korea.

      Pretty much every culture in the world has negative things about it. My countrymen complain about our country constantly. However, when it comes down to it, they still are proud of the same country they were criticising.

      4 years ago
  86. I am definitely one of those Americans that if I ever travel abroad I would use the “Canada Shield”. Granted I agree with some of the American stereotypes, I just try my hardest not to fit into them.

    I have never heard about Koreans not smelling, and was floored that they don’t wear deodorant. I would probably be so self conscience if I ever went there about it now. But at the same time I totally want to find someone to test it. I would probably get some REALLY funny looks if I tried sniffing some random Korean people to see if they smell. >_.>

    I have no idea why this interested me so much, /facepalm.

    4 years ago
  87. Interesting topic!

    In my school I have come to known many Korean foreign exchange students and most of these stereotypes I’ve seen and heard about. First of all I am Mexican and 5’5″, curvy and my skin is tan which you guys really didnt talk about (there arent many Mexicans/Hispanics in Korea obviously). Some Koreans were very open minded about my skin and culture and viewed me as exotic, but there were a few that were very brash.. They would ask me the same questions that you guys said and would just always stare at my skin or make critical comments on my hips and boobs (hello, I cant help it!! > . > Then when I told them I was also Mexican they saw me even more in a sexual light and would say “exotic”, it was very disturbing since I had a feeling some only came to the US to score “the loose American girls”. On relationships men would strive to date whites, have sex with Hispanics, and were curious about what it would be like with black girls. Girls wanted to date white guys however any other color and many would only wonder but never actually did it. My friend really liked a mixed black guy but rejected him because she was so worried about her parents and the fact that she should only be with asian or white men. : ( However not all of them were like this, and many were open minded and I even snagged myself a wonderful boyfriend hee-hee <3

    Their opinions were split about Hispanics as a race. Some though I was stupid and poor because of my color and acted superior to me and didnt want to be my friends and hung out with the whites instead…others were very interested in my culture and didn't really know much other than salsa music and small Spanish phrases that they heard in Kpop and Kdramas XD However other than our color, we both realized that our cultures are very similar from food, religion and family values even some Spanish was similar to Korean words : ) I'm happy to say that one girl who was very critical of Mexicans thinking they were all poor ended up liking us so much she took Spanish classes at our school and begged me to teach her recipes and even now that she's in Korea she is still practicing her Spanish : ) If anything they dont know much about Hispanics other than the racism projected from the America's in news and shows they've seen. But I'm very glad to see the efforts of Korea to open up to the world ^ ^

    4 years ago
    • I’ve actually noticed the similar culture thing too. I’m cuban, and a lot of east Asian cultures/traditions are similar to the ones I’ve grown up with. Family values and respect for elders is a big thing for both cultures. I’m also really pushed in school, anything less than an A is a failure, school is considered to be “my only job in life” while I’m young. Also, rice everyday with every meal no matter what time. Taking off shoes at the door also, and being really focused on wealth/status are other things. High belief in superstitions and home medicine. Less focus on individualism, strict parenting. Its really interesting the similarities found between the two cultures, I’ve tried to research it before but I havent found the much info on it. I know that many east Asian values come from confucianism/taoism, but spanish culture doesn’t really have anything like that I think? Anyway, the similarities are an interesting discussion topic.

      (ps- Have any spanish speakers seen flower boy next door? The male lead is supposed to be from spain and his spanish i really cute any funny ;D )

      4 years ago
      • hahaha yeahhh his spanish surprised me!! I was amazed they decided to provide the main lead with such characteristics :D . . . but he defo says “cagar/cagado” waaaay to much to handle lol!! I had so much fun watching those scenes jajaja

        4 years ago
        • OMG YES I died watching the scene where he just says random spanish stuff like a gangster or whatever hehehe

          4 years ago
  88. Are chinese or japanese mistaken for koreans?

    4 years ago
    • I’m part Chinese and when I asked my Korean friend, she said there’s no way I’d be mistaken for Korean. I don’t mean offense, but a lot of Koreans have less prominent noses while with Chinese and Vietnamese it’s more noticeable. Also due to fashion trends, Japanese people tend to have thinner eyebrows than the Koreans that like the straighter thick eyebrows cause it makes them look younger. This obvious doesn’t apply to everyone, but it’s usually how I make my distinctions.
      Funny enough, no one seems to guess my ethnicity right, it’s actually amusing.

      4 years ago
    • Asian people usually seem to know when someone is Chinese or Japanese based on details in face structure and eye shape. Of course, some people look like they could be almost any type of Oriental Asian, but people can usually tell. Also, if the person is talking, the presence or absence of an accent could also be used to determine ethnicity. (I’m not being racist, I’m a Taiwanese girl who is admittedly generalizing a bit. I personally can’t really tell the different between the different types of Oriental Asian yet, but apparently my parents and some of my Asian friends can tell and are usually right)

      In conclusion: I wouldn’t think so, but it may happen to some people who have generic facial features.

      4 years ago
    • Yeah! Like in Coffee Prince where they weren’t sure if the guy was Korean or Japanese, but he ended up being half.

      4 years ago
      • If you’re talking about Kim Jae wook, he’s fully korean but was raised in japan

        4 years ago
      • are u sure?……i think he was a Japanise guy who loved a Korean girl and followed her and her child to Korea…..

        4 years ago
        • I might be confusing it with Flower Boy Ramen Shop, and the fact that Pillar was half, you’re probably right, I didn’t enjoy Coffee Prince all that much, don’t remember details that well.
          Weren’t they unsure whether he was Korean or Japanese though, because he could speak both?

          4 years ago
        • I think the guy from Coffee prince was half Japanese/ Korean. Also, remember there are people who are ethnically Korean who have been living in Japan for a few generations, so they speak Japanese but are still considered Korean. ( Crystal Kay who is a An R&B singer from Japan has this sort of heritage, mixed with the fact that her father is African American.)

          4 years ago
        • these people are called zainichi koreans, cristal kay is half zainichi. Another example would be verbal from M-FLO, both have japanese as their first language and can’t barely speak korean

          4 years ago
        • Ah, thanks for reminding me of the term. It was like 2 am when I posted that and I couldn’t remember. There are quite a few Zainichi Koreans in Japan. It is quite interesting how they are still identified as Korean because in order to become Japanese they would have to let go of their Korean Name and take a Japanese name, literally erasing themselves from the family register and basically disowning their Korean lineage.

          Stuff like the Korean family register thing intrigues me because since I am descended from slaves, most of my family history is lost. I will probably never know where my ancestors came from ( unless i launch a full scale research into the museum’s archives and even then i think it is pretty unlikely since many of my relatives were born at home and their births were never officially registered. But in Korea they have that handy dandy register.

          4 years ago
  89. what do u or s.korea think about the recent scandal of seven and other celebs?I really wanna know ur opinion.

    4 years ago
    • check out netizenbuzz :D
      they release the top netizen comments for articles about them and they are furious

      4 years ago
  90. Are there also stereotypes on people with red hair in Korea?

    Just wondering because of reasons…

    4 years ago
  91. Have you ever met the Eat Your Kimchi’s of other countries or seen their videos, are there other Youtube channels like Eat Your Kimchi out there?

    4 years ago
  92. Oh man, I live in Texas and I can tell you racism is alive and well in this place, including discrimination against women. From what I see on dramas, (and I am sure some of that is exaggerated as well) women aren’t exactly at the top of the pecking order there either! As one of your more mature fans, I can tell you it is about time we all stopped this xenophobia and recognize ourselves as members of an all encompassing human race. ps: I shower at least twice a day out of habit and because it is so damn hot here!

    4 years ago
    • Cool more Texans! There is racism here, but I think is depends on how far from the city you are. The more out in the country, usually the more ignorant and more likely to say offensive things. I find that in the bigger cities like Austin, racism doesn’t really exceed much more than any other states that I’ve been in. (Oh and I’m assuming you’re mentioning yesterday’s filibuster ordeal).

      For your second thing, I think it’s a great motion. But I also think it’s much easier to say that in a country that is intentionally mixed. Xenophobia is more apparent in places like South Korea and Japan, where it’s easy to tell if you’re a foreigner or not. In Texas, unless someone spoke or did something completely out of social norms, I don’t assume they’re foreign since everyone here looks different. It’s less about maturity than it is of ignorance, bad history, and misconceptions.

      4 years ago
      • I don’t know; I think that city discrimination just looks completely different from country discrimination. Although, I think it’s funny because once you leave your hometown you find that every part of Texas discriminates against each other, IT’S RIDICULOUS.

        4 years ago
  93. Hey you two……50 Is not OLD>>>>I AM A HUGE KPOP FAN AND I AM 56….NOT OLD…NO WAY.

    4 years ago
    • Hellz yea!!! You are awesome! My mom has totally stolen my ipod before and jammed out to my kpop songs. You are awesome and you know where the music’s at ;P Who’s your favourite?

      4 years ago
  94. Martina! In your suitcases, there must be one of shoes, bras, ranch dressing and deodorant! ( creepy kinks…)

    4 years ago
  95. 279 comments??? HOLY CRAP NASTIES

    4 years ago
  96. Oh my God. I’m an uneducated prostitute from the Philippines. LOL!!! No hard feelings here. ^_^ Filipinos have their own stereotypes on foreigners, too.

    4 years ago
  97. I think some of these stereotypes happen just because they have no prior experience or knowledge. Like the whole asking if the dark skin color will wash off. The thing were foreigners. Are the ones bringing the diseases and not ever the Koreans well it might just be that they feel superior, but doesn’t every other race or culture? I don’t think anyone should take any of those things too personally.

    4 years ago
  98. This is awesome! I lived in china for a bit and I had to deal with the American girls are easy stereotype a lot… Almost every guy who came up to me on the street had that idea… Also when I was shopping I wouldn’t say I was American cuz they assumed I was rich and would charge a ridiculous price!

    4 years ago
  99. I’ve always been curious about this topic. Thanks for doing a video on it! ^^

    By the way, are there any stereotypes for Arabs? Besides the common “all of them are Muslim and/or terrorists”?

    4 years ago
  100. Hello guys!! thank u for this TL:DR it was very interesting!! I wanted to know if there are any steriotypes about arabs in korea?! do u have any informations about that?!

    4 years ago
  101. I’ve always thought about what people in Korea think about Japanese Americans. I always hear about Filipino/Chinese people. I know Korea has issues with Japan and some korean people look down on the japanese but I want to teach in Korea but people keep telling me not to go because I’m part japanese.

    4 years ago
  102. I’m an American who studied abroad in London and I was quite worried about receiving hate because I’m aware of the fact that a lot of people dislike Americans (or it seems that way). I even considered pretending to be from Canada. I actually live very close to the Canadian border so I’m in Canada all the time. But I just couldn’t lie and I told everyone I was American, and I never received any hate about it. People were also very interested in it. I remember that they could always tell that I was North American. I was always asked, “Are you American or Canadian?” cause my accent was strong so they knew I was from one of those places. I have a degree in English literature and I plan on teaching abroad. I’m feeling these doubts again, but I just remember what happened in London and I feel better. As long as you are nice no one should give you any hate (hopefully).
    I thought this was a very good TLDR and I think it was one that needed to be done. If one just gives a light and fluffy view of Korea then people remain ignorant. In my opinion these things need to be discussed and said.
    One thing I am afraid of is not being considered seriously as a foreign teacher. I studied hard at school and I have teaching experience and I am taking the job seriously, and just because I’m a foreigner means that I’m bad? I am afraid of this, admittedly. But I will just work my hardest and hope this gets through.

    4 years ago
  103. Are there any stereotypes about Bangladeshi/Indian/Pakistani people????

    4 years ago
  104. What about Vietnamese Americans? (*Like me ahem*) I just want to know!

    4 years ago
  105. I got asked if I was Russian too…but I have brown hair and hazel eyes o.O

    maybe it’s got something to do with the face shape too?..

    4 years ago
    • I have brown hair and brown eyes and when I lived in Busan, old Korean men asked me all the time if I was Russian. Even though literally every single Russian person I saw there was blond. There is a big stereotype of Russian women being prostitutes, but the only ones I saw were southeast Asian. (there is an area around Busan Station with hooker clubs and stuff, and I literally only ever saw Asian girls there)

      4 years ago
  106. I’m actually curious about what they think of Arabs in general???

    4 years ago
  107. Oh, and I was wearing my thickest winter coat and baggy jeans. Hm yeah.

    4 years ago
  108. Riding the White Horse? Lol. No, it’s true. I’ve had a fairly easy time finding Korean men who want to date casually but it’s been sooooo hard to find one willing to bump up the relationship to “Let’s go meet my folks!” status. I know a few other Caucasian girls here who’ve had similar experiences. Anyway, lots of the Korean guys I’ve dated have been great but I’m still waiting for that one who falls for me hard enough to ignore all the traditions and expectations of his own culture. I’m moving back to Korea next month so maybe third time’s the charm? Wish me luck on finding my true love! :D

    4 years ago
  109. Are there also stereotypes about german girls or germans in general ? :D

    4 years ago
  110. BB

    It’s funny how being Canadian has an overall positive connotation to it. Even studying abroad in America, saying I’m Canadian makes people assume that I’m instantly super nice and love maple syrup. The latter is wholly true.

    Etobicoke represent! I actually walk around with a Canada pin on my backpack with pride :)

    4 years ago
    • I’m from America & have worked with Canadians both in the States & in Canada. Every Canadian I have worked with has been so awesome. So much so that it became a running joke that Canada is where the nice people live. Except for this one guy, but he was still very polite ;).

      4 years ago
      • BB

        Sometimes I wonder if we (Canadians) are nicer because of the stereotype — we wouldn’t want to disappoint all those who believe in our niceness!

        4 years ago
  111. Oh …. i´m the living stereotype…i´m a stinky white girl with big boobs and i was born in Russia (now i live in Germany, but i really look like a russian girl) T.T….my year in Korea will be hard =( ( i think i should start learn how to course in korean =) )

    4 years ago
  112. If there is such a negative image about America – why in kdramas do they always talk of sending people away to school or to get away to America? Just got me wondering.

    4 years ago
    • Well there are great colleges here and you’re learning English. That would make them a double knockout on a resume if they were to return to Korea later on. Oh and a plus, America usually just equals = LA and New York, so take what stereotypes are about those cities and reflect that in a Korean view.

      4 years ago
  113. the perception of the US and its citizens in other countries is a funny thing…I’m living in Costa Rica right now and I’ve met tons of people whose dream it is to go to the US, but no one seems to actually like US Americans. every white(ish) person is assumed to be a “gringo” but when people aks me if I’m from the States and I say, no I’m German, they sometimes actually apologize :D it’s kinda nice to feel good about being German for a change…

    4 years ago
  114. Get on the subway during rush hour and the subway definitely has an odor to it.

    4 years ago
  115. Haha I had to explain what deodorant was to my husband and why white people have to use it. He was totally baffled when he saw me put it on for the first time… and two years later still continues to tease me lol

    4 years ago
  116. I am curious to know if today’s US supreme court ruling about gay marriage was mentioned at all over there (since there is a US air base). If so, I wonder how much that affects the view of Americans and our “diseases.”

    4 years ago
    • I doubt it would be mentioned in Korean media because being gay is pretty underground there. I had quite a few LGBT friends in Korea from the foreign community who in turn introduced to me a few Korean LGBT but outside the foreign community it is pretty hush-hush. A friend of a friend who was a lesbian Canadian NET was fired from her hagwon job when the boss found out she was gay, so…

      4 years ago
  117. Thanks for posting this video Simon and Martina and putting yourself out there for everyone. I’ve been a Nasty for a year or so now and have fallen in love with all things Korean. It has been my dream to save up enough money to travel and stay in Korea for an extended stay with my teenage son. It makes me sad that America is perceived so negatively. But its good to know – I want to bring my teenage son and give him an experience of life outside what he knows. I guess we’ll have to practice being quiet around others before we go. Oh, and if someone asks I’m from Utah – we’ll see if they even know where Utah is. Or even better I’m from South Jordan (the city I live in). Ha!

    4 years ago
  118. Tbh. It’s pretty often I’m mistaken for a prostitute here in singapore even though I wear 3/4s or baggy shirts, or jeans, or anything really. Ppl would chat me in Mandarin and ask which part of China I’m from as pick up lines. And get stare raped (eye rape?) Often. Cause of my chinky eyes….

    4 years ago
  119. I’ve somewhat experienced the issue of homosexuality with my Korean friends. They either didn’t care or said they could never become close friends with someone who was gay. When I questioned why, they said because it’s wrong and God doesn’t approve. When I asked more reasons, they just said they were raised to believe that.

    When it comes to African-Americans, I’m always haunted by this video.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HzxJoYPQCyc

    And then I say, NOT EVERYONE BLACK GUY IS LIKE THIS!

    4 years ago
  120. Ah that thing about Americans. So true. American tourists have such a bad name ;A; I’ve traveled to Europe many times and there is always those few drunk annoyingly loud and overly proud Americans that ruin it for every level headed American //sigh I’ll just put a Croatian flag on my backpack. it’s not a lie but not the full truth! xD jk jk but seriously, Americans have a bad name not only in Korea but most of Europe too :
    But anyway, this video was very enlightening :] thank you for sharing and brining into light that Korea is just like everywhere else in terms of stereotypes and racism. Every place has it and people need to realize that it’s still an issue going around worldwide

    4 years ago
  121. First off, I’d like to say thank you guys for talking about this subject, even though it’s a really sensitive topic to cover. There will *always* be people who try their hardest to paint you guys in the worst light or think ill of you, so don’t let them influence you guys. You’re awesome :D

    Secondly, I’d wonder what Koreans would think of me. I’m a fairly light skinned black guy who is rather flamboyant. I do not conform to many stereotypes about black people (except the fried chicken and watermelon one, but that’s more a southern thing than a black thing) and I’m really used to laughing them off. I’m also really used to people touching my skin and hair (which really surprised me at first, because you’d think they’ve never seen a black person before XD), so yeah… I guess I’ll get shushed a lot (I’m really loud) and looked at funny (too many reasons to list). Should be fun ^^

    4 years ago
  122. I laughed at certain points…. am I a bad person?

    Also, it’s not just having blonde hair and blue eyes that makes you a “Russian prostitute.” My friend and I are both brunette and had it said to us. I can only assume it’s cos we were out past good girl bedtime (we’d be to a norebang!) and were wearing skirts (longer than most of the ones I saw for sale in Korea. Or possibly it was just cos we’re white and female….

    4 years ago
  123. Oh stereotypes, how I love this. And I can speak from 3 distinct experiences:

    Sweden: I live in Sweden, I was born in Korea, and until I became a woman (having grown from being just a teenager), people always presume I came from either China or Korea to study in Sweden… until I open my mouth. Because I grew up here I don’t have a distinct foreign accent, so that makes most people understand early, but otherwise everyone (who don’t know me btw), thinks I am someone who moved here.

    But on another note, there are tons of other stereotypes that I almost mistake at times:

    Norwegians, happy and rich from oil. On one note, one of my Norwegian friends quite happily admitted Norwegians are probably the happiest people in Northern Europe. Good for them. Some Swedes though consider Norwegians quite loud, festive and rulers of buying all of our houses on the wet coast, because well… it’s cheaper than in Norway.

    Danes, apparently drink and smoke way too much for their own good. My guess is however this is based on Swedes coming to Denmark where the beer is cheaper. I know a Danish comic writer who did a comparison to this, and informed that Danes in fact storm Germany for cheaper beer.

    And Finland was at least known for being quite cold and almost dangerous (males). This really makes no sense to me, as I can’t see our neighbours acting like such, even though I guess some are pissed of they still have to learn Swedish in school. Note to this: No one in Sweden cares really whether Finnish people learn swedish or not.

    My second experience of stereotypes based from a country comes from having studied in China. Being born Asian, I melt into anywhere, until once more that I open my mouth. Since China has been an important part of my university period, I got to learn a LOT about the Chinese, however if anyone from China reads this, feel free to correct me if my memory is jumbled.

    American people are awesome to get to know, to a certain length. Americans know English, so if you get to know one, don’t let go of that person because your English can improve by a lot. Also, I noticed that many girls liked the idea of finding an American boyfriend.

    Japanese people are bad, which I guess bases on the history between China and Japan, which is indeed riddled with a lot of problems.

    Korean people are well… OK, but annoying. Sorry Korea, but from what I could gather since Korea has been seen as a small part of a Chinese rule and friendship, there seems to be no real love or hate. However, I do know that the government is constantly annoyed by North korea.

    African natives (or black people) are most likely going to rape you. This is something one of my teachers said, as few Chinese people seems to trust in your skin colour. Bullocks if you ask me, but I actually barely saw anyone black.

    And finally, a Korean perspective on people born in korea, who cannot speak the language.

    At the age of 16, I revisited Korea for the first time. My dad wisely asked a flight attendant to write me a card which said:

    I am adopted, and I can’t speak Korean

    in case someone would try to ask or tell me things.

    Thank GOD he did.

    I’ve literally been yelled at for not trying to interact when meeting people in Korea until I was able to show them the card (in which they would normally either appologise or laugh it off). This is an advice for anyone adopted to revisit your birth countries: Do the same! it makes a lot of misunderstandings easier.

    4 years ago
  124. I’m of chinese descent but not born in China… But still I find it quite difficult to differentiate between japanese/chinese/koreans… So are they able to? I remember once going to Taiwan, and well, they didn’t see me as a foreigner at all… It was as if I was one of theirs…
    If you’re asian looking, can’t you just be perceived as korean? Just wondering…^^

    4 years ago
    • S&m said before oriental asians had a harder time adjusting because koreans expect them to follow their cultures etc but are more lenient to foreigners that don’t look like korean at all. So… maybe not so. But yeah you can kinda tell people apart actually. Except for some.

      4 years ago
    • Actually, I would say no.

      I’m Viet-American and while I don’t live in a Vietnamese community and I’ve always been the only only asian in my school out of thousands, I can tell asians apart. I can tell if they’re southeastern, korean, chinese, or japanese. Most other Asians can tell as well. There’s also a lot of differences and a lot of bad blood between different nationalities. My parents always comment like how Koreans are all fake and plastic, how Chinese people are bad, and others. It sucks, usually if you’re not Korean you won’t be perceived as one. Then again if you looked Korean enough, you could pass.

      Anyways, just my opinion. Feel free to think for yourself as well.

      4 years ago
      • Well, to some extent I can tell them apart… But not all the time~

        But personally in my country it is true that most(if not all) asian are from China…

        Thanks for your reply

        4 years ago
  125. The ‘slow race, eh’ made me laugh soooo hard omg :’D

    I think MOST East Asians have the same stereotyping towards South East Asians, I hear it all the friggin time from my family like ugh why does it concern you, stop talking about it…

    The dating thing is so true too; so many of my friends tell me their parents are SO against them dating/marrying people outside their own race.

    I have a younger brother and we once talked about dating and stuff with my mom. She told him,
    “You can date whoever you want. If you’re gay, that’s fine with me. Just… try to stay away from Middle Eastern people…”
    And to me, she said, ‘…You can be lesbian, I’ll still love you bc you’re my baby, but don’t date blacks, Middle Easterns, Hispanics, South East Asians, or fobs. Date only East Asians who grew up here (Canada) and white people”.

    I’m lucky my mom is relatively more open minded than most asian parents her age but still, she watches the news and go off about how an entire race is screwed up bc of… not so good incidents. She’s so set about her image of Middle Eastern people even when I try to tell her, goodness, not everyone’s like that, just the crazy small minority that gets blown up in the media…
    I’m painting my mother in a bad light lol uh… ilu mum ♥

    4 years ago
  126. Unfortunately a lot of people from the South think all Asians are just Chinese and are all smart with high GPA’s and strict parents -_- this video isn’t offensive at all. I really enjoyed watching you guys. My best friend went to South Korea recently and she’s a lighter skinned African American. People thought she was either Alicia Keys or Beyonce although she doesn’t resemble either of them lol. I know that people who have darker skin are seen as dirty a lot of them time but I really want to know what they think about lighter skinned black people who aren’t really dark — just darker than the rest of the South Korean population in terms of skin color as well as interracial dating with someone who is also darker? If anyone knows I would love to get a comment from you.

    4 years ago
  127. You talk a lot about misconceptions in Korea..which was suuuper interesting!
    I kind of want to know more, the dark skin thing really gave me a “wtf moment” it was shocking, like.. woah.
    But I’m still curious as to what other things Korean’s, especially the young generation are simply not educated in ..and so.. they say the craziest things.

    a question that I can’t help but ask is: Is it true.. about the crazy expectations Korean men have on Korean women? Like some expect the women around them to be like perfect dolls, who never need to use a washroom. I remember one time where Martina mentioned how the “trend” was that women had to be cute AND sexy ..at the same time. Which.. seems impossible to me.

    well.. I guess the question turned into ” How much do south korean women/women in south korea go through in terms of prejudice and impossibly high expectations? ”

    I’ve had this question in my mind floating for a while after watching.. tons of Kpop male group/actor interviews and some drama’s where women hid there ‘true selves’. It’s understandable when they say they want someone nice and pretty.. but then there are times where women are expected to be absolutely perfect to be ‘good enough’. I know this may not even be a thing, and it’s just drama’s stories maybe.. but I feel like it’s still happening, even if it’s not 100% of South Korea.

    4 years ago
  128. I love living in a multi-cultural country. I would get so bored seeing people that looked like me everyday and I also think I would miss out on so much.

    4 years ago
  129. When I was in Japan and people asked where I was from I said Phoenix, then Arizona, then America. It helped stop them from making assumptions too quick. :)

    4 years ago
    • ….is that why Americans never say they’re from America? :/

      Wow I must apologise in that case. Because, you see, I found that rather annoying. It makes me feel stupid because might not know where that city is.

      http://fuuko4869.tumblr.com/post/24386926384/i-would-like-to-make-a-point-here-americans-often

      4 years ago
    • I am very curious as to how that worked out.

      4 years ago
      • Well, it helped gear the conversation towards talking about my hometown rather than America as a whole. But sometimes, they just had no clue about anything, and I would end up having to say, “You know the Grand Canyon?” But then I had to explain that I don’t live anywhere near it.

        Interestingly though, I just stayed at a hostel in Flagstaff and I talked to a guy there from Japan. I asked him where he was from and her replied, “Oh, I’m not from Tokyo”.

        “ok, so then where?”

        “Well, you probably won’t know.”

        “Actually, I’ve been to Japan, so I might.”

        “Oh, ok!”

        He was clearly assuming that people from other countries think everyone from Japan is from Tokyo or one of the big cities. He’s actually right, most of the people I talk to assume that when I was in Japan I stayed in Tokyo. Or, since I was in Japan when the Tsunami hit, I must have been in the same area that it hit. I have to inform then, that the Tsunami didn’t flood all of Japan. :)

        Anyways, when you spend a while in a country you learn how to be clever with your responses, avoid stereotypes, and keep conversations flowing in a better direction. I think its fun. :)

        4 years ago
  130. In my country people think everyone who looks Asian is from China.

    4 years ago
    • Germany??? =))

      4 years ago
      • Nope the Netherlands so it’s pretty close ;)

        4 years ago
        • yeah in germany it´s the same……all asians are chinese …..=/

          4 years ago
        • I think it’s the same in a loooot of countries… I’m from Uruguay and it’s the same there too haha

          4 years ago
        • in Spain it’s also the same… -___-

          4 years ago
        • in Poland too -,-‘

          4 years ago
        • I’m not of asian haritage myself though, so I don’t know how bad it actually is. o:

          4 years ago
        • my friend is an asian girl and she is from vietnam , her name is Phuo Ong but the (dumb) people here often call her Ling Ling or the Chinese one …….sad but true

          4 years ago
        • :c that’s too bad. Here people assume they work in Chinese restaurants and that if you’re Japanese you’re some kind of crazy person. Don’t even think they know South Korea is different from North Korea. (my grandfather did business with South Korea for a long time and he had to explain everyone it isn’t the same)

          4 years ago
  131. In my country everyone from Asia is Chinese.

    4 years ago
  132. The malaysian/china/vietnam etc asians though. Probably we’re thought to be overall poor thus also overall dirty unhygienic dumb crime prone etc lol

    4 years ago
  133. I wonder what the sentiments and feelings are towards Koreans who were either born in North America or immigrated there and go back to visit in Korea?

    I still can’t help but think about how much better the world would be if we took the time to communicate with one another rather than jumping to speculations or stereotypes [I know, I know….that’s a world of unicorns who eat rainbows and poop butterflies]. Nevertheless, I think it would elevate us to higher levels of functioning and thinking as a human race if we spent time seeing each other equals. But I will say that I get a hella kick out of life when I break stereotypes that are appended with being “black” here in the states. People are always like “oh no she didn’t” when they find out that I’m Caribbean born and raised, with a Brooklyn accent, who speaks 4 languages, goes country line dancing regularly in cowboy wear, and has 10 times more Kpop music on her iPod than rap songs.
    Stereotypes serve only to allow you to make assumptions, and we all know what happens when you ASSume!!

    4 years ago
    • wut

      girls are just fine and boys may have problem with peer men only due to the military.
      if they are something like 1.5immigrants and go back to korea and work without going to the military.
      many would see them as they are just taking advantage of korea.

      4 years ago
  134. Does anybody know what kind of racism there is about Indian people? Or people with Indian roots not necessarily from India?

    4 years ago
  135. A lot of 1st generation Koreans or 0 generation Koreans in America are like this too. Not ALL are, but there is so much elitism and racism among Koreans towards other Asian ethnicities. I’ve heard a lot of Koreans call Chinese food “Cheap food” or “Dirty food” in Korean.

    I’ve found that in general, Asians look more and more downward at Southeast Asian ethnicities. Koreans, being the most Northern, have this tendency to look down upon Chinese and further down, while Chinese look down upon the Thai and Filipino, etc.

    4 years ago
  136. I know this was uncomfortable for you guys to talk about but it actually answered a lot of questions I had so you know yay. Seriously though, all countries have racism and cultural stereotypes even us Americans so I really hope the haters out in webland can understand you weren’t being malicious in any way by bringing some of these things to light.

    4 years ago
  137. What do Korean/other Asians think of Indian people? Honestly just wondering because I have no idea haha
    anyone please answer, I’m really curious :D it’s okay if it’s bad lol..

    4 years ago
  138. I’ve got my earplugs on and surprisingly Martina’s (on the left side of the video) voice is coming out from my right side of the earphone, and Simon’s (on the right side of the video) voice is coming out form my left side of the earphone. It’s mirrored!

    4 years ago
  139. do many people watch animes in Korea?

    4 years ago
  140. Wow! This is a really great approach and discussion of a sensitive issue. When I first read the title, my innocent little mind thought you’d be talking about how Koreans freak out when foreigners order spicy food and tell them to not eat it/prepare less spicy dishes because white folk can’t handle spicy food (… a very sad thing because I like spicy food). Instead I watched this and am so impressed. What you’re discussing is real, important issues that help your viewers think about the world without ill intentions. Awesome job. Go S&M!

    4 years ago
  141. I laughed the whole time

    4 years ago
  142. Along with the whole Canadian vs. American thing, I’ve always been told to tell people I’m from Texas rather than say I’m american. Apparently being from Texas is better abroad then it is in America haha.

    Although I’ve met countless people (In the US & others) that believe I ride a horse to school and I live on a ranch with a ton of acres of land for my cattle.

    I mean come on guys, the Spurs don’t play in field of corn and neither do most of us.

    4 years ago
  143. Are there any specifics for Dutch people?

    4 years ago
  144. OMG that white horse thing is SO true! I had been chatting with a Korean rapper (who shall remain nameless) at a show and before he left we exchanged info. A couple weeks go by and I run in to his Korean friend and he says that they’d been talking about me. He preceded to tell me that Rapper boy and the other singers (mostly Korean guys) had been referring to me as the white unicorn! #sob Then he told me about the “riding the white horse” thing & that they changed it to unicorn cause of my hair colors..which I’ll admit made me laugh at how ridiculous it sounded. But that ish is real especially with guys raised in Korea!

    4 years ago
  145. Howdy do! First I am so happy that I found your site, FB page, etc..as we are newbies here and are ready to jump in with everything!! :) My daughter and I enjoy learning about and experiencing new cultures and peoples and find your sense of humor and knowledge on a variety of topics enjoyable. This particular post was informative and reminds me of things I have heard or encountered while traveling. Looking forward to laughing, learning and meeting cool ppl here!!! BTW you guys are a beautiful couple!! God bless your marriage! <3

    4 years ago
  146. Interesting TLDR indeed!

    My black friend asked me to go to Seoul with her two years ago and after we booked the flights and all, she told me she was worried because of her skin colour. While we were there everyone was super friendly to the both of us (as far as I remember)

    I did however notice that I only got the free egg to the dokkbukki when I went to eat it alone (but that might have been simply because 1 free egg give away per day is more affordable than 2?)

    What did bother me though was that everyone assumed than we were US Americans, even though we spoke German with each other all the time! That did seem rather silly to me.

    There are stereotypes everywhere, that’s true.

    I moved from west to east Germany (for uni) and my dorm mate is from east Germany and she keeps giving me all sorts of stupid stereotypes on a daily basis. For example the comment about Chinese people and them not washing, which you mentioned in your video, except that it’s all of Asia for her. She has something against Spanish and French people too, because they are “loud and uneducated”.
    And when she got her new Austrian boyfriend, she told me about how he was um…let’s say ‘not at all foreigner friendly’ and was completely astonished when I told her that I don’t want him in our dorm, because in her opinion ‘there is nothing bad about it’ and ‘it’s completely normal’ Let’s hope they break up soon.

    BTW you just helped me with my portfolio homework about prejudice, which I have to hand in tomorrow morning before my intercultural communication exam THANKS

    4 years ago
  147. As far as I can tell, there are different ‘sections’ of Koreans (that sounds wrong but I cant articulate it well). Well, I mean there are ‘westernised Koreans’ who have maybe got American/European friends or been there. There is also the generally older Koreans, who are less westernised and are more prejudiced…I don’t know, that is how I understand it.

    4 years ago
  148. Just from what I’ve seen, it seems much more likely for Korean girls to marry non-Korean guys than the other way around, even though you said it’s looked down upon and that for Korean guys dating non-Korean girls it’s seen as cool. But what about marriage? You said they don’t want to bring the non-Korean girl home to their mom so they usually don’t get married, but let’s say they did, will they get looked down upon in public like the Korean girls with non-Korean guys? Or will people still think it’s cool (just the guys parents may not be happy)?

    4 years ago
    • My fiancé is Korean and I’m white. He moved from Korea 4 years ago. When we started to go out together, he told his parents immediately about me. They asked him: why not a Korean girl?

      But they kinda expected this to happen because he is now living in Canada.

      So, we went to Korea in december for me to meet his parents officially. They asked me if I was serious about the relationship and if I wanted to marry their son. I said yes and they offered to pay for our engagement rings. They also bought me a necklace as a welcome gift in their family.

      When we were in Korea, we were not touching or kissing in public. But the way we were looking at each other, made it very apparent that we are a couple. Also, my boyfriend didn’t want to wear gloves because he wanted to show off his ring even if it was super cold outside. LOL

      So many ajummas looked at us and smiled at us. One grand-pa gave us the thumbs up. All his friends and extended family welcomed me.

      Seriously, if you meet a Korean guy and he tells his parents he’s dating you, then it’s really good. It means he’s serious and he knows his parents will accept you. If he hides it even after many months of dating, then he’s probably scared that his parents won’t easily accept you in the family.

      4 years ago
      • Thank you so much for your answer!! And congratulations on being engaged :) I’m glad his friends and family accepted you ^^

        4 years ago
  149. This is a really interesting video! Through facebook and Kpop pages have this funny group of friends in Korea who are super social and open hilarious group chats with dozens of people (Mostly Americans, but some Malaysians, Japanese, etc.) and its this cool way I’ve gotten to have international friends! I used to feel awkward because I thought maybe there was just too much of a cultural difference and they might judge me because I don’t have an even remotely similar body type to Korean girls (I have blonde hair, blue eyes, the whole big butt and boobs thing), and my personality has cute in SUCH a different way. But we’ve all had open opinions about each other and its been the most fun experience of making friends that I’ve ever had!
    <3 one of the guys I like confessed to me too, so now I KNOW I'm not being judged for being different and I'm not nervous anymore :)

    4 years ago
  150. Are there any stereotypes against Indian people? Or just ‘brown’ people in general? I’m actually from Bangladesh but most people don’t know where that is =_=

    4 years ago
    • Lol hi! Always nice meeting other Bengali K-Pop fans :D

      4 years ago
  151. Moral of the Story: assumption is the mother of all bad ideas. Ignorance is everywhere, from the largest city to the smallest town, from a particular nationality to individual members of your family. Its up to you to break those stereotypes one by one. Be considerate, understanding, respectful, and caring to everyone around you, even those who mistreat you simply because of a stereotype they believe, and we can slowly change the world’s view. We cant give up and we cant give in. The eye sees what it wants to see. See with your eyes, not with your opinions.

    4 years ago
  152. I’m almost out of my stock of good deodorant…..oh the woes of being a stinky foreigner.

    4 years ago
  153. i know this is a seriously video, but I laugh a lot

    4 years ago
  154. Oh god, white girls have big boobs? I’d hate to see their faces when they see me. A CUPS UNITE.

    4 years ago
    • KkKKk …don’t worry …Don’t you know that what does no fit into guys hand is superfluous ^-~….amen.

      4 years ago
    • This is a stereotype that needs to be destroyed immediately.

      I’m just going to post this once, but “A cups” can be anything from tiny to REALLY BIG. I am a 28E, which is equivalent in size to about 38A, BUT I look very “small”. I’m wearing the right size bra after many years of being told I’m a 34A. So I’m just going to share this for all the women.

      If your bra does not touch your chest between your breasts, it is not the right size. If the band does not stay horizontal to the ground, it’s the wrong size. If the cup / underwire cuts off before the middle of the side of your body, it’s the wrong size ( right under the armpit ). If you cannot push your straps off your shoulders and have your bra stay where it’s at, it is not the right size ( exceptions for very, VERY large breasts ).
      Your straps should not be giving you the most support, 95% of the support should come from the band. Hence, when you measure, it needs to be very snug and do NOT add anything to it. My chest underneath my breasts is exactly 28 inches, and even though it felt tight at first, you will be more than happy that you don’t have to adjust your bra all the time. Measuring around the largest part should be done sitting up and leaning over at a 90 degree angle, to use the average for the most accurate measurement. Sitting up to measure needs to be horizontal to the ground, same with measuring around your ribcage, and has to be done with absolutely nothing on, no shirts, bras, etc or you will get the wrong size. The difference between these 2 measurements is your size, like this: 1 inch = A cup, 2 inches = B cup, 3 inches = C cup, etc.
      American sizing is wrong wrong WRONG and you should not even bother. Buy bras made in the UK / Europe, their sizing is much more standardized. They also don’t do triple-letter sizes, which can be confusing in the first place. Some might cost a little more, but it is absolutely worth it to get a correctly-sized bra. I’m unlucky enough to still have a difficult size to find ( 28E ). And please remember, this is a starting point for a correctly-sized bra. You might differ by a cup size or band size depending on the style.

      So when you say A cups unite, just remember you’re calling me and everyone else out too, because every single size of bra is equivalent to an A cup in some manner. I would be a 38A if the band size came anywhere close to fitting. It’s also equivalent to a 36B, 34C, 32D, and 30DD. [ Bra cups are made like this btw, the ones I said are all exactly the same size in the cup area, it’s the band length that’s different. a 36A bra is smaller in volume and size, but is exactly the same cup as a 34B, 32C, etc. Wikipedia chart – http://tinyurl.com/4otkp86 ]
      Adding a picture of me and my “huge E cup breasts”, on my 5’3″ ( 160cm ), petite frame.

      4 years ago
      • Nev

        Understood in principle, but Im a brit we get measured properly in uk measurements, an as much as Id LOVE to be a 28F I know Im a 32A… BOOooooooo and not every breast can fit an A cup no matter how big a chest size you go up to, on a large breast at best its going to be a nipple coverer , at worst a chaff hazard. :D

        3 years ago
        • You can be a 44A and not have any issues with it covering your nipples. It’s made to properly fit and cover what should be covered for that size. The “A cup” is not some standard size with a different sized band to go with it, it changes along with the band size. These are all A cups – http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_kRtu3QFUkWc/THnPmIm0nbI/AAAAAAAAEAU/-q_pJmuejeQ/s1600/tlbc2.jpg
          Also, as stated, American sizing is wrong and I encourage women to go with British sizes. My size of 28E? Brit size, not American.
          Also, here’s some of those “huge DD cups” ( warning: nipples )- http:// tinyurl. com/95fw6mc

          3 years ago
        • You can be a 44A and not have any issues with it covering your nipples. It’s made to properly fit and cover what should be covered for that size. The “A cup” is not some standard size with a different sized band to go with it, it changes along with the band size. These are all A cups – http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_kRtu3QFUkWc/THnPmIm0nbI/AAAAAAAAEAU/-q_pJmuejeQ/s1600/tlbc2.jpg
          Also, as stated, American sizing is wrong and I encourage women to go with British sizes. My size of 28E? Brit size, not American.
          Also, here’s some of those “huge DD cups” ( warning: nipples )- http:// tinyurl. com/95fw6mc

          3 years ago
      • I gotta save this. Thanks!

        4 years ago
    • Yeah does Korea know that in America all dresses are made to fit B-sized cups? And in major department stores don’t make bras past size C?

      4 years ago
      • (UK here) I have to search FOREVER to find a good A cup bra. I get that the population is mostly bigger than me boobwise but I’d very much like some clothes and bras for me, too :( It’s way easier to find bigger bras in the UK than small bras.

        4 years ago
        • Somehow I am not surprised… I know in the UK there is a company that ONLY does larger sizes. But then again, I think the US is more prone to wear sizes that are too small. There is this HUGE perception that D cups are massive. I’m a D cup and thin. I have rarely get told that I have a huge “rack” or I get people who raise their eyebrows when I say my chest is too big to fit in some clothing.

          4 years ago
        • Exactly. They think I wear a small size bikini top.. which wouldn’t even cover half my breasts, not even the nipples.

          4 years ago
    • i heard this about Hispanic’s and black girls from asian guys.

      4 years ago
      • Is it just like a universal belief that all girls have big boobs?

        4 years ago
    • lol can’t have both huh? A-cup with a butt xD

      4 years ago
    • Reporting in! I’ve finally come to terms with having small boobs, I don’t care anymore haha

      4 years ago
      • oh god, me too. I used to hate my boobies, but they’re pretty fantastic. :D

        4 years ago
    • Woohoo for A cups! XD Sorry not sorry for disappointing them. haha

      4 years ago
      • Hey, my boobies are awesome and if they disappoint Korean stereotypes then that’s their loss. BOOMSHAKALAKA.

        4 years ago
    • Then you can wear all the awesome Korean clothing. :( JELLLLYYYYY!!!

      4 years ago
      • While in Korea, I asked my Korean friend where I could buy a D cup bra. Though not common in young women, you do see ajummas with fuller breasts; I figured, they must be buying those bras somewhere! She took me to a big lingerie store, and it was such a joke. There were bras labelled C & D but they were designed for A sized breasts plus enough padding to appear on the outside to be C or D. Clearly not gonna fit an actual D inside. I never figured out where the ajummas got their bras. I should have just asked one!

        4 years ago
      • I even have problems wearing stuff in my own country because of my boob size. Korea would be absolutely impossible. Was in Hong Kong for a bit en there too, they only sell A cup. Felt so cheated :P

        4 years ago
      • Exactly….E-cup sadness :(:(

        4 years ago
    • Oh god. This means I’d perpetuate that stereotype. (still in high school and has DDD cups)

      4 years ago
      • High five lol! I’m still in high school and am a large C cup with 42 inch hips

        4 years ago
      • Join the club.

        4 years ago
      • Haha! My friend is like that. We both complain about our respective boobiness/lack of to each other. I’d love to see the faces of the people who think this stereotype is true after my friend and I stand next to each other xDD

        4 years ago
    • itty bitty titty comittee reporting in!

      4 years ago
    • Nev

      YAY for us smashing international stereotypes the world over !!! :D

      4 years ago
  155. aw! y’all handled that very well.

    and as always y’all are just adorable.
    I live in the deep south(US) so I can appreciate a calm matter of fact handle on topics like this.

    4 years ago
  156. Polish people steal german cars. And could drink a lot, especially when they’re drinking with Russians. Simon, you have it in your blood, so… watch out for the police ^^

    4 years ago
  157. Nev

    How do Koreans consider the English? Eg me = English through n through, typical 4 weddings and a funeral / country living etc etc BUT I look indian/mediterranean , olive skin, hazel eyes n dark (at the minute red) hair, so would I get treated in anyway differently from someone who fits the stereotypical image of an english person? Or is there no actual image of the english in Korea? Are we lumped in with the Americans – as some homogenous ‘white folk’!! O_o

    4 years ago
  158. Stereotypes/racism is everywhere. I live in Arizona USA, which you might have heard about the some of recent laws passed here that have caused many outside of the state think we are all anti-Hispanic bigots. We really all aren’t. I don’t even think that all supporters of the law are racist towards Hispanics, more fearful of the cartels and gangs associated with a select few of the American Hispanic community (like really really really tiny amount). But gangs are in every major city in the US, not just Arizona.

    But it the stereotypes go the other way too. I teach at a high school in Phoenix where 95% of the student population is Hispanic. Because I’m white they often assume (and tell me) I must listen to country music, automatically I am a Republican that hates “Mexicans”, and rich. And when I start to do things that are against their stereotype of me, like play k-pop or talk about video games, they freak out a little. Then they ask if every k-pop artist knows karate or kungfu because they are Asian. ::face palm::

    P.S. the number of my Hispanic students that use the “n” word to each other is quiet unsettling.

    4 years ago
    • After years of teaching, I don’t take anything from students personal anymore. I truly believe it is due to lack of experience, with a little fear built in. I try to provide experiences that help to breakdown these stereotypes in my classroom. It takes time and patience but I get through to a few and that’s all that matters.

      4 years ago
    • I’m from Phoenix, and I experience some of the similar things. Thankfully, my sister married a Mexican, so people no I’m not prejudiced.:)

      Also, most the people I talk to in Phoenix no absolutely nothing about Asia. When I was 16 I decided to sell my horse so that I could invest in school and be able to save money to go to Japan (I did go twice). I stopped riding horses, and when I tried to get back into the horse community it was hard. They were like, “you went to Japan? Why?!!”

      Usually, I don’t get mad when people use stereotypes, because they have no idea that what they are saying is a stereotype and are just innocently stating what they believe to be a fact. But, I enjoy bursting there preconceived notions about different cultures.”no Japan does not have vending machines that selling everything on the planet all over Japan. Just Tokyo. Sorry!!”

      4 years ago
    • I’ve noticed that the whole “rich american” stereotype is very common among hispanic people. My family is Mexican, but I was born and raised in the U.S. When i went on vacation to Mexico last year, a few boys approached me and talked to me. An uncle of mine saw that, and had a talk with me about how I should marry someone in the U.S. and have a good future with money instead of marrying someone from Mexico who won’t finish his education. It surprised me that he thought all Americans were rich, but even more that he’d put down Mexicans like that.

      4 years ago
      • I think they just see the U.S. as a better place to live. Many people believe this to be true. I think it’s because many people see it as the land of opportunity and the American dream. There us poverty in both countries but a lot of people that go to the U.S. see it as better. I think the US dollar being worth more than the Mexican Peso has to do with it as well.

        4 years ago
  159. Really interesting post, one of my faves so far, thanks so much for this video! On the other end of things, I have had a lot of discussions with South Korean colleagues working and studying here in the states, especially over stereotypes the guys face trying to be taken seriously as leading men on stage in musicals and theater. A lot of my friends feel like they are beating their heads against a huge discriminatory wall here. One of my girlfriends says if she gets stuck with the “submissive Asian flower” role one more time she is gonna run screaming for the hills. Ignorance lives everywhere.

    4 years ago
  160. I’m not sure why people would get offended, like in the U.S I’m Laotian, but everyone I meet assumes I’m Chinese and the language sounds like Ching chong ting tong. Luckily that has been slowly changing, but still.

    4 years ago
  161. I object to the observation that Korean people don’t smell. When I lived in Korea for 6 years there were many Koreans that smelled of Kimchi and garlic…lol Especially when you are on a crowded bus.

    4 years ago
    • Also, why say you are anything then what you are? I mean really! When I lived in Korea I was always treated with respect by the Koreans and they knew I was an American. It really has a lot to do with having respect for each other. I find it ridiculous that someone would claim themselves other then what they are. Buying a Canadian patch so Koreans, or anyone else would think you are something that your not. Shame!

      4 years ago
  162. From what I’ve observed, Korea is a very conservative and religious place. I’m wondering how big religion is in Korea, which religions are more prominate, and how do they view atheists? (also have you met many Korean atheists? Is atheism even really a ‘thing’ there?)

    4 years ago
    • Some of your answers can be seen from here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religion_in_South_Korea
      If you are from a country such as the US where the majority is one religion, then I think going to Korea you will find it is much less religious. However, you are more likely to hear from religious people than irreligious people because irreligious people have nothing to gain by “converting” people but religious people do. The few Korean people I’ve talked to about it were surprised that I’m not a Christian (one said she was happy because her American friend always tried to convert her and tell her he’s sad she’s not a Christian). Although I’m a Buddhist I identify more closely with atheists. In America atheists are becoming more open about their lack of beliefs due to unfair laws and such but in Korea I think it’s not talked about as much. Also the irreligious people I’ve talked to seemed to still celebrate holidays like Buddha’s birthday. I’m not sure if Christians in Korea celebrate that as well.

      4 years ago
    • I asked a similar question somewhere below! The answer was really informative :)

      4 years ago
  163. OMO, “Riding the White Horse” O.O My boyfriend is Filipino and after being with him for so many years he had shared the art of finding humor in other’s stereotypes :) He will appreciate this phrase lol

    4 years ago
  164. Nic

    Also, judging from the blog post you probably saw those really really dumb tumblr posts about you guys being racist and “white privilege” blah blah blah. Obviously the people saying that crap know nothing about you – though one mention was of something in a live chat… live chats go for an hour or more right? So did some person who already hates you guys watch the whole thing just so they could pick out one thing and twist it into something it’s not? There are some really sad and pathetic people out there.
    ANYWAY, I just wanted to let you know that although those things suck, there are sooo many people who understand you and think you are doing a great job and who also get annoyed at that type of ignorant hate (I had a good rant to my husband about rude things on tumblr, because it was so completely unfair), so yeah just wanted to say keep up the good work.

    4 years ago
    • +1 for confirmation bias. Someone went to college ~.^

      4 years ago
    • There are always people who are gonna say that white people suck, and I really hate it. A lot of my friends are white and it hurts my heart when they get pinned with the blame for crap that their parents think or that their family has done in the past when they’re really cool peeps. Anyone who says that being a minority is harder than being white needs to get a reality check, because being white has it’s own set of stereotypes (and idk if anyone has realized this, but yes, you *can* be racist towards a white people; if you discriminate against them because they’re white, that’s racism).

      4 years ago
      • Haha my poor dad gets racist comments from my mom all the time. Whenever we argue with her, she goes, “Ugh!! You’re so WHITE!!” xD

        4 years ago
      • i hope that dislike was an accident someone made… but i agree

        4 years ago
        • I honestly don’t care. I’m just calling it as I see, and I see both sides take shots at each other. I have friends who have worked their butts off to get where they are, and people just assume that they were handed that because they were white. It’s just as annoying as when people generalize that black people get where they are because they were pitied.

          4 years ago
  165. I recently dated a Korean boy, he was born in Seoul but lives in Canada, and I noticed a lot of differences when dating him than when I dated Caucasian boys. First, I consider myself to have pretty normal view for my age group, on sexual orientation and other races, as well as my views on sexuality as a whole. When I told him that I was a virgin (I was 21) he just simply wouldnt believe me, because I’m white, he also bragged a lot to his friends back in Korea that he was dating a white girl. At first I was annoyed but I explained to him how he misunderstands caucasian women and we arent all like ‘Gossip Girl’ levels of sexually active, I did get through to him but his preconceptions were very much “oh shes a white girl, so shes easy and provocative and must have dated a lot” (oh btw im also blonde with blue eyes so that might have also contributed to his views).

    I constantly felt judged by his Korean friends because of this, because I knew what they were thinking. Anyone else have a similar experience?

    4 years ago
    • Nic

      I just asked my husband about this (he is Korean) and he said the hollywood movies and the TV dramas have a big influence and that’s why a lot of people believe that. However, not everyone believes that, he said a lot of dumber guys will believe that because they aren’t thinking it through and not realising that things get exaggerated or may just be wrong. I have never felt judged like that before by my husband’s friends, but also they mostly really nice, or really smart guys.

      4 years ago
  166. What if you say you’re from Hawai’i? I know we’re American but would it get the same reaction? There are a LOT of Koreans here.

    4 years ago
  167. Are you guise sure you added enough disclaimers ?!!
    I’m SO glad I’m not American and I’m dark blond with hazel eyes :p Sadly I don’t fit the filthy rich prejudice either :(. I would have set foot in Korea years ago if I had any money to spare. If I ever make it there it I’ll be sure to mention I’m Dutch and hopefully they’ll still remember and love Guus Hiddink (the soccer/football coach who led South Korea to the semi’s in the 2002 Wolrd Cup).

    4 years ago
  168. Oh Lord stereotypes are so funny, I suffer from many different kinds of stereotypes since I kinda don’t look like I belong in any race and just kinda have the look of being a mix of a lot of things even though I’m 100% latina, and depending on the person I could be white, mixed, Mexican, or Asian sometimes but no matter what they’re always wrong, even so I’ve had people discriminate against me for the way I look, but still I find stereotypes funny seeing as its because its a thing that you hear about rather than experience, sometimes the person who perpetrates the stereotypes are completely innocent but other times they do it on purpose because they truly believe it’s true. *sigh* point is that I consider the Korean culture still living in a sorta 50’s American years where they haven’t experience much of the world yet and most of the things they know generally come from word of mouth. Then again it’s up to the younger generation to stop the stereotypes and help the older people become more open minded toward foreigners.

    Oh and another thing I noticed is that every one in the world hates Americans. about the blog what are the Korean stereotypes for japan?! Are they the same as American stereotypes for japan or worst?

    4 years ago
    • Oh my goodness, there’s this really old cultural bias against Japan in Korea. Scholar ambassadors from Korea in the Joseon Period (I think) visited Japan and brought back impressions of them being uncivilized and somewhat barbaric because they didn’t follow the same Neo-Confucian sociocultural and political format as Korea did. They did maintain trade with Japan, though, for monetary reasons. Japan, on the other hand, brought back lots of artistic and artisanal influence from Korea, but in the 1800’s, during their nationalist movement, made a huge effort to purge foreign influence from their culture. Korean culture began to be looked down upon by the Japanese and then came the Japanese occupation of Korea.

      Most of the modern negative Korean views of Japan seem to come from this time. I’d share more but this is all second hand knowledge laced with my own opinions and educated guesses so do take it with a grain of salt!

      4 years ago
  169. I believe you must have been fascinated about how different races in Singapore live together…
    However, yes we do have some stereotypes against foreigners.

    4 years ago
  170. So I am a Prostitute from Russia? thats weird. and the big butt and boobs thing is kinda true for me and my friends lol

    4 years ago
  171. I love that you made the point that it’s just because the country is still pretty new to this kind of foreign exposure. Things will change, it will just take a while to get used to. I have so many friends from Korea who have come to America and have been completely blown away by me and my friends. Many of them were so shocked when I went out of my way to do something nice for them and would not stop telling me how nice I am. I was just doing what I normally do for friends… Also, I’m not “loud”, that might have been a little shocking as well… As I said before, I think that perceptions will change, and they are with this new generation coming up. We live in an age where we can meet new people from different countries online and travel is (although expensive) much more accessible than it has ever been before. Eventually these stereotypes will fade :) Thanks for the video, Simon and Martina!

    4 years ago
  172. (How to say this?)martina you not shuould…..I mean you should use…for you know…for “the girls” not be all free and jumping or just falling down making you look fat….
    YOU SHOULD USE A BETTER BRA WITH SUPPORT TO HOLD THE GIRLS IN PLACE. IN FACT YOU SHOULD USE A BRA!

    [I am sorry I not mean to sound harsh or rude]

    Argentina Nasty. Love you Guys <3

    4 years ago
    • I am not putting her down. I just give a tip. I did not want to offend U__U

      4 years ago
      • I’m not judging. surely if I express bad. My English is not the best. I apologize in the first comment. and I turn to apologize to her. the intention was not offended

        I will never not use the comments section inappropriately again(joke)[dont kill me please]

        4 years ago
    • Her dress is fine. Seriously, posting how you don’t like someone looks or wears clothes and body parts is as equally offensive, rude and insensitive. Being in Argentina you should probably know how hot and humid it is now. I have seen people in Buenos Aires wear MUCH less!

      4 years ago
      • Argentina is not only Buenos Aires. I live in a even more hot part of the country I understand and is obvious that dress would not look good with a bra. Is a simple tip just say no offense

        4 years ago
    • I like her, as you put it “free and jumping” style today. A bra wouldn’t look nice on that dress~

      4 years ago
  173. “I’m not a loser! You are! BOOYA!” And then high-five myself and leave. That taught em. That taught em real good…

    lmao XDD

    4 years ago
  174. Yeah. We’ve heard a few times “there are no gays in Korea” said with totally straight face.

    4 years ago
    • Is there something wrong with being a gay in Korea?? Are people forced to be a closet?

      4 years ago
    • And yet K-dramas suggest that it is perfectly normal for a husband to leave the marital bed and sleep in the same room as his visiting male friend… like that’s not odd at all :p

      4 years ago
    • How about the actor Hong Seokchun, how is he not considered a homosexual male even after his coming-out?

      4 years ago
    • I hesitated between laughing and being shocked when he said that.

      4 years ago
  175. Actually I saw in Korea many korean girls dating a white guy but I couldn´t find any korean guy with a white girl :X

    4 years ago
    • Nic

      *raises hand* I know a bunch of other Caucasians with Korean husbands/boyfriends too.

      4 years ago
  176. This video wasn’t offensive at all, I really enjoy it..
    btw… the issue and reason because we the “foreigners” smell and they don’t. It’s based on DNA. Most asians have a mutation on the genotype proteinic ABCC11 making that 30% to 100% of the asian population don’t smell. I just hope someday pharmaceuticals can reproduce an anti-genotype to avoid smell :D

    Thanks for the video guys <3

    4 years ago
  177. When I read “Teeeeeeaaaaammmmm BREAK” I thought it say TAAAAEEEEMMMAAANNN and I was really confused until I looked closer….

    4 years ago
  178. Americans are generally disliked in most countries. honest to God. No one likes us lol. But its ok, these are stereotypes and its up to the individual to change that view of a person they are interacting with.

    4 years ago
  179. It makes me sad. D: All because our military is fucking stupid doesnt mean that all americans support what they do. Ill more or less hide the fact that im from here. T.T

    4 years ago
    • We are an American military family stationed here in SK and we have had nothing but a warm welcome since we got here. Not all military are stupid – nor do they perpetuate the stereotypes that are rumored about them. -thank you very much. o.O If we want to stop stereotypes, we need to start with our own.

      4 years ago
    • Some of the stuff I hear that the military does overseas when they aren’t protecting the country is rather baffling sometimes. I understand if you would want to hide it- tbh, I’m not going to say anything unless I’m asked.
      I’m just not sure “liar” would be a good stigma to add to the already lengthy list of generalizations pushed on Americans visiting other countries. T_____T I wouldn’t want to betray the trust of the friends I meet while I’m there is all. ~____~

      4 years ago
      • Unfortunately Americans aren’t seen very well in lots of countries!

        4 years ago
        • Yes it’s kind of embarrassing really. I try my best to be respectful and open minded. And no I don’t expect everyone to speak English so put a little more effort if that’s the case

          4 years ago
  180. That’s weird because all the Filipino friends I had growing up (in Pickering) were all loaded with huge houses and really really loved Jesus. Like, really really. :D -Simon

    4 years ago
  181. Something that really bothered me when I went to South Korea, is the fact that kids and people all thought I was … American ! No offense guys, I love you, but I’m not American ! They asked me : Bigu? Animnida ! Pourangseu ! Yes I’m French ^^ So I was annoyed and amused at the same time ! They were really cool kids and nice persons I met. Can you imagine that a woman in her 40’s asked me if I could be taken in photo with her? ^^ I loved your video and agree with what you said !

    4 years ago
  182. Blacks are less than welcome in Korea. At least in countryside anyway.

    4 years ago
  183. I think that when it comes to datign, is actually an asian thing, but not in the particular way you expressed,I mean, for example, I live in Peru, and dated a Peruvian guy for a while, and when I told my Chinese parents, they were like… Peruvians (or foreigners) are not for you, you belong to marry a Chinese guy ( or Asian at least), BREAK UP WITH HIM OR WE WILL DISOWN YOU….<-this kind of phrases. Yes, I know they hurt, but it is like that. And also, for Asians, or some Chinese at least,they tend to think that dating a white skinned blue eyed foreigner is accepted (regardless of your feelings) because of what you said in you video like being super rich and stuff like that.But if it is a south american person or black skinned people, they just think they the worst kind of people, ranging from violent to very sexually oriented. This is how at least chinese people see as from what I've experienced.

    4 years ago
  184. What do they think about half-Asian people?

    4 years ago
  185. I found this TLDR very interesting and I formative. It was difficult at times dealing with stereotypes as a foreigner in Korea but its also not their fault. Korea has not been exposed to foreigners for very long and when do they spend their time researching about foreigners if they’re always busy. Students are always at school and hagwons while fathers work 23 hours a day. The little information they know about foreigners may be based on what they’ve heard from others limited experiences and possibly biased. I’ve also found that younger generations rely less on stereotypes and look forward to meeting people from all over the world. In fact, I met some pretty cool ajjumas that enjoyed foreigners as well. Thus, my point is stereotypes and racism exist everywhere and instead of getting angry about it we should educate ourselves in hopes of bringing light to others eyes. Amen!

    4 years ago
  186. Based on what a Taiwanese friend told me back in the day, I think a lot of the negative stereotypes towards blacks in Asia originated because most of the black people there were slaves in the British Colonial era. I think this is part of where the whole obsession with pale faces (for the ladies) comes from because no one wanted to be mistaken for a slave, or slave’s progeny.

    Following on this topic, it would be interesting to know what kind of stereotypes Koreans have about themselves, like the whole having a “v” chin being cute and a high bridge on your nose means you’re independent, those kind of things.

    4 years ago
    • Another reason for the obsession to the pale face thing would be that having a pale complexion shows that you were well-off and didn’t need to work out in the field.

      4 years ago
  187. I feel as if many of the Asian countries have similar sets of stereotypes about Westerners and each other, haha. Even the elderly in my family who migrated from China and Taiwan still do–you learn to laugh it off (sort of). I was on a trip in China and being young, approaching-marrying-age Chinese-American women, my sister and I kept getting unsolicited advice from elderly, racist Chinese people. They told us not to date Japanese people (both of us were dating Japanese guys), probably because of former World War issues. They told us not to date Korean people (something about being shallow and terrible husbands). And then went on to discuss how New Yorkers (we are from New York), Chicagoans (sister went to college there!), and Americans in general were terrible. According to them, by far, Chinese people were the only appropriate race to date (and I definitely didn’t want to get them started on any race with a dark skin tone!).

    Asian (women) in America, you mostly deal with being objectified by men as exotic and obedient, and thus uber desirable. You also get comments like, “Damn, your ass is big for an Asian!” and “Ni hao ma” as common pick-up lines >_>. I imagine for a Caucasian woman with blonde hair and blue eyes in Asia, it’s similar?

    4 years ago
    • Yeah among Chinese people, Korean and Japanese husbands have a reputation for beating the shits out of their wives.
      Marriage desirability in the minds of old Chinese people:
      Chinese > Chinese mix >>> Whites >>>>> Koreans and Japanese >>>>>>>> Southeast Asians >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Black people and Indians

      Other races don’t exist in their minds.

      4 years ago
    • Sounds like my experience with the Pakistani aunty crowd. They actually managed to admit there was nothing great about Pakistanis either (they’d just dismissed every other country in the world as “to avoid”) which was an IRL Goodness Gracious Me moment.

      4 years ago
    • definitely experienced that, I am living in Peru, South America, and seemingly for my parents, chinese is the only appropiate race to marry, even though you don’t exactly see good examples of chinese good husbands.
      In Peru, here they tend to say those kind of phrases like what you said: “Damn, your ass is big for an Asian!”, and that is unasked for.

      4 years ago
      • seriously? I’m from Peru and I’ve never heard that. Then again, I don’t have many friends of Asian descent :P Where exactly do you live?

        4 years ago
        • Living in Lima, a chinese brought up in Lima, and many times I go out to the streets,this type of harrassment comes along too. Like they also point out at you, and yell out, ” china cochina” and other rude comments…. obviously not everyone is like that, but sadly, it is very frequent.

          4 years ago
    • I’m not even have a fair skin as East Asians. But not only once or twice people greet me with: Ni hao ma. May be my only mistake that I always pull high bun as my hairdo. So they thought I was Chinese (another stereotype regarding hairdo?)

      4 years ago
    • LOL I also live in New York and get comments like “Ni Hao Ma” and stuff.
      I find the stereotypes funny. I find it funnier that there are stereotypes within the Chinese community depending on what dialect of Chinese you speak.

      4 years ago
  188. Ouch…I”m Chinese-American… dam…

    Everyone has their stereotypes. My mom knows about my liking to Korean culture (specifically to the Male Kpop idols), and she told me that I wouldn’t get a Korean guy because they demand too much for a girl.<— Like you guys, not all Chinese people are like this.

    I wonder how some of the foreign idols feel during their trainee process with all these stereotypes floating around.

    4 years ago
    • Ouch… a dog eat dog world. I thought about being a trainee, but observing how there was a huge increase of idol groups since 2008-2009, I literally was like “Nope… realistically speaking, I may not get in… dam…”

      4 years ago
  189. OMG I’m so proud of you guys for facing difficult topics like this. It’s important for there to be some kind of discussion about prejudices in any and every culture. I think, with the extent to which Korean people are proud of their culture (as they have every right to be), it’s much easier to glaze over stereotypes that some people believe and just let the jjang koreanness wash over you.

    A note about Japan (agh people please don’t kill me), the Japanese exchange students that I’ve met have mentioned that their interest in Korean pop culture hasn’t been deterred by their political opinions (usually concerning the Dokdo/Takeshima
    conflict). One of my firens has said that she thinks that though Takeshima is Japanese and has conservative views on the Japanese occupation of Korea during WW 2, she still supports loves and supports kpop groups and wants to go back to Korea. Have you noticed similar views of Japan (a separation of politics/history and pop culture) from the Korean people you’ve met?

    I’m actually excited to see which of these stereotypes affect me while I’m in Seoul this summer! Haha is that bad?

    4 years ago
    • Nic

      I have noticed that sometimes too. For example we have a Japanese friend who loves Kpop and has many Korean friends but then also believes that Korea, China (and other countries too) made up a bunch of lies about Word War 2 and Japanese occupation and all that, and that Japan was in the right. She couldn’t understand how offensive it was to say that directly to Korean people and how it might affect her friendships with them.

      4 years ago
  190. smh. Filipinos..uneducated? *holdinganger*

    4 years ago
  191. Oh no I have blue eyes and blond hair… I’m Finnish though. XD I’m going to Japan for a year and I got my little Finnish flag I’ll attach on my bag. Btw I also had to take HIV test for my exchange student application for Japan…
    About those Japanese Korean issues… Yeah that is some. Funny thing is that many Japanese women/teens like Korean men right now, as they are popular through k-pop and dramas but others… not really. One example I’ve noticed, there’s this avatar game site called Pigg. There’s “rooms” you can go with your avatar and one of them are so called “channel” rooms. You can play music videos there and be like a dj. Well there’s different rooms for genres and one of them is for k-pop. For every other channel I’ve seen, they’ve played the right genre music but the things I’ve seen played in k-pop rooms (by trolls of course) have been from North Korea’s anthem to j-pop to even a video of a woman in bikini washing a tub. I’m pretty sure they are grown people there trolling in such a childish way. And yes it is very annoying when you try to enjoy music from 4 different djs and at least one of them is a troll EVERYTIME. Both countries should really solve their arguments because as a person who likes them both, it saddens me a lot.

    4 years ago
  192. Errr guise? What about Europeans? Why all always forget about Europeans? XD

    4 years ago
    • wut

      im korean and people like british culture mostly music some are intersted in even celtic folks.
      girls go crazy over french fashion. boys go crazy over german cars.
      nordic countries very well respected as well due to their attitude, rationality , welfare etc.
      netherlands are well liked as well mostly because of gus hiddink.
      slavic girls are considered very beautiful.

      4 years ago
    • Americans are very interested in British things too… We just find them very fascinating :3

      4 years ago
    • Maybe they think that Europe is like Narnia or Middle Earth LOL
      I’m curious about their perception of italians and Italy. Please not only pasta, mafia and mandolino. And Berlusconi. >___<

      4 years ago
  193. I’m a Filipina too and its sad how sometimes we deal with this stereotypes of being “uneducated”, “domestic helpers” and for being “gold diggers” by marrying foreigners. :( I hope someday this will change.

    4 years ago
  194. OVO

    The Russian saram is so recognizable. I’m not even blond, nor do I have blue eyes, but my friend did so apparently that makes me Russian saram by proxy. Anyway, interesting TL;DR! I really enjoyed this topic even with all the (regretfully necessary) disclaimers. Thanks for not shying away from these kind of things completely even though you get so much backlash.

    4 years ago
  195. Haha best of luck guys with your upgraded security :) oh here’s an idea. When someone wants to attack you etc. hold meemers up to their faces, get him to pull a “Puss in boots from Shrek”… they’ll be like awwww and then run for your life!

    4 years ago
  196. I’m tempted to tell my boyfriend Minsu about this “white horse” thing and see what he says… x3 He’s Korean American so I have no idea if he’d know. But way to get a good laugh out of me, guys! xDD Dear lordy.
    I’m assuming I’m the white horse… but I’m really short, so I guess I’d be considered a white pony. ;D Ponies are cooler.

    4 years ago
    • Ahahahaha- I’m gonna have to ask my bf too if he knows about it! I’ll def be a white pony with you… I’m like more than a head shorter than him… >.<

      4 years ago
    • It’s the “ponies are cooler” that really killed me here XD

      4 years ago
  197. This is really, super duper interesting and I love it.

    4 years ago
  198. Wonderful TLDR as usually. Just wanted to say that I really miss when you used to draw figures and different stuff and have them come on the screen when you were talking. You talking about the ajumma shhing you and talking loud reminding me of your old TLDRs and made me miss them. I know you are really busy and probably just don’t have the time to do it anymore. But if you did bring it back I would be really happy. :)

    4 years ago
  199. This was a really good TL;DR, I am glad that you are not (too) afraid to explore controversial subject, because really, there probably isn’t too many other places to get the information. I think that due to the zeniphobic nature of some governments, a lot of people in Asia just don’t have exposure to other parts of the world so that they freely imagine weird things when they encounter something different, rather than that they are trying to be insensitive. We are lucky here in Canada that we get to meet people from all kinds of different backgrounds so that we don’t end up with weird ideas due to lack of information, we can just ask :).

    4 years ago
  200. The only Filipinas I’ve ever known were so filthy rich, they were marrying Hong Kong Chinese chaebol heirs (dunno what those sorts of families are called in HK). If anyone else I’ve known has been from the Philippines, they never told me and I didn’t think to ask, probably because it didn’t matter at all.
    Oh wait, there was that girl from high school. She got a Range Rover for her 16th birthday. Yeah, I don’t know any uneducated domestic worker Filipinos…

    4 years ago
  201. My husband is Korean and moved to America 10 years ago. We have a beautiful little girl, but I am kinda of nervous cause we are visiting his family in Seoul next year… I wonder how they are foing to treat us…

    4 years ago
    • We almost have the same first name! I’ve never seen anyone with my name haha
      Good luck~!

      4 years ago
  202. Thanks for such great vid! As far as chinese people are concerned I was in China for a bit and well.. they tend (not all chinese ofcourse) to forget about washing their teeth… (that’s also among my chinese teachers at university) but they are cool peeople still!

    PS. Lots of love from Poland! (I am eating ptasie mleczko right now… I know I’m bad person…)

    4 years ago
  203. Hey… So I’m not much a traveling type of girl.. I would like to go to a country and live there a while. but i was warned not to move to Korea even though i have been interested in it for a few years now… But people told me not to go since i’m black (though I swear since i was raised by a white family in Oregon, Simon is probably 10X more gangster and hood then I am) I was told that if i moved there I would make no Korean friends… and i would be forever alone… D:

    4 years ago
    • That’s totally not true. it all depends on your attitude! Like anywhere in the world, be friendly, make an effort to learn a little bit of the language and people will welcome you happily. We know plenty of black, white, Asian, European foreigners that have Korean friends, love living in Korea, and have dated Korean people.

      4 years ago
    • Not all Koreans are racist, a lot are becoming more open minded. Im sure that u would make friends :)

      4 years ago
  204. Mon

    What if I just happen to be Canadian AND American? lool.

    4 years ago
    • Dual citizenship ftw! Gotta love having a choice between 2 passports. ^_^

      4 years ago
  205. This was really insightful! I can’t even get started on American stereotypes and I don’t want to, but I really hope you won’t get too much hate from this…

    4 years ago
  206. Thanks for posting this video guise even though it’s a rather sensitive topic. I think it would be a good idea if every person started to think about the stereotypes they have about other cultures. I am actually an ESL teacher (so I have students from all over the world), and I have on occasion talked about stereotypes with my students. I ask them to be really honest about sharing their stereotypes, and then we talk about them. It is always so awesome to see how their opinions change once they have actually met people from other cultures and ethnicities. Also, I just wish people would stop relying so much on stereotypes to guide their perceptions of people. I just want everyone in the world to be friends *sigh*.

    And Martina, do you love puppies? :D

    4 years ago
  207. yup, happens in other countries of course. I feel bad you two have to disclaimer out the butt, I totally understand some people spaz quick.

    What I find weird, since I’m mixed (filipino/white) Canadian and that I’ve recently moved to the US, when they hear I’m not american, I’ve had many of comments of “Wow, your english is so good!” Durrrr.. yeah, we speak english in Canada, eh?

    4 years ago
  208. Your exactly right, every country on the planet has their own versions of stereotypes and racism and you cannot deny it. I think you have a lot of guts for putting this video out and anyone who gets Butthurt from this video, needs to go get a life :)

    4 years ago
  209. this was interesting. The stereotypes seem so bizarre. But then again I’ve never been to Korea so.. I guess they’d think that the stereotypes people have here are bizarre too.
    On another note, when I was in Japan I remember being on a train and explaining about the schooling system here (UK) to the students who were showing me around. I don’t think I noticed how loud I was talking, but I got a lot of nasty looks from the other passengers, now I’m guessing its a similar reason to what you guys were talking about :P

    4 years ago
  210. Any stereotypes towards Muslims/Christians?
    Please please answer! I would really like to know.

    4 years ago
    • I can’t find subs but does anyone remember this star king skit from a while ago?
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x9MKwKzPN9E

      They apologized to Muslims after the outrage…

      4 years ago
    • There aren’t really many stereotypes towards Christians except there are some denominations who are known for being very zealous in their proselytizing- beyond that, Christianity is very common here.

      Muslims? I haven’t really heard any of my Korean friends talk about the subject, but I think generally the most common thing is sheer curiosity.

      4 years ago
      • Nope not really! I think that religion is somewhat personal here, but also (this happens frequently with Korean friends) if we discuss religion, I stated mine and frequently they will say a) I have no religion or b) I don’t know.

        I usually will ask “So you mean atheist or agnostic?” (or look up the Korean word) and they go “Yeah, I guess I didn’t really think about it.” It doesn’t really seem to be a big deal one way or another- unless, similar to other countries- you are dealing with someone who has very strongly seeded beliefs. Then they might be a bit shocked. But, in general, nope :)

        4 years ago
        • That’s awesome! I’ve read about how many Korean people can very passionate about their religion. I’m from the USA and my family is largely Christian and very, very passionate about it and, as I’m an atheist/agnostic/ that usually translates to them trying to convert me haha. I figured it might not be the same in Korea but I’ve read SuJu interviews where the other members talk about how Siwon really into his religion and used to try to get them to go to church with him.

          I’ve noticed something similar with Japanese exchange students at my university. They like to ask about American religion because in Japan, people don’t really talk about it and it’s viewed as something more personal as opposed to America where so many topics are religiously charged. And, when we talk about our personal religious views, they say that they either A) don’t care about religion or god, B) decided on their religious views when they were old enough to decide for themselves, or C) their parents are religious but don’t really care what their children decide.

          4 years ago
    • Muslims, yes. Christians, what could they have since it’s a common religion in S. Korea?

      4 years ago
  211. that’s mean…if I’m Russian I will be a prostitute in Korea? xDDD Oh, man….It’s hard to live :D

    4 years ago
  212. I actually knew most of these but riding the white horse huh? kinda funny I think that is a song too….

    4 years ago
  213. I had always wondered about stereotypes. Especially blonde foreigners in Korea since i am one xD But yeah awesome video, very insightful ^^

    4 years ago
  214. Whenever I travel out of the country I tell people that I’m from the US and most of the time they’re always really surprised. When I ask why, they always say its because I’m so quiet and nice….. lol

    4 years ago
    • living out of the country so often, I now cringe when I am asked what country I am from. I am a citizen of the United States of America, and I am not ashamed of myself. I AM ashamed of some past actions taken by the US government that have created so many ill feelings for other countries.

      In South America I learned NEVER to just say I was an American. They often countered with, “So am I but what country are you from.” That statement really made me think about how others view the US. I have great talks with Peruvians about the perceived arrogance of the United States…and it humbled me. I came back from South America with a new outlook, and a new appreciation for the foreigner living and struggling with language issues. It is NOT easy learning and new language and culture, and we need to show compassion rather than frustration and hate.

      But back to the subject…*grin* I often counter the question of “Where are you from?” with “Where do you think I am from?” It starts a conversation rather than accusations.

      Thank you for this TL;DR, I loved it and value the fact that you guise are brave enough to tackle these sorts of topics.

      4 years ago
  215. Good luck you guise! I’m American and I’m seriously considering getting some Canadian patches before I come over to Korea, but I don’t know if my conscience will let me do it. :) Nice video, as always.

    4 years ago
    • You don’t really need that….I’ve gotten the “thumbs up for American” in Korean taxis too so…..

      4 years ago
  216. Filipinos. Uneducated, prostitute. :( more like they are trying to work hard so that their family eat 3 times a day. :) but as Simon and Martina said, not everyone in Korea thinks like that. I hope so.

    4 years ago
  217. I found this video to be really interesting, at some points it was even funny. Thank you so much for doing the video guys! I didn’t really know those type of stereotypes existed in Korea! :D Greetings from Mexico! ;)

    4 years ago
  218. what about hispanic/latina women??

    4 years ago
    • Mmmm… I’m not sure, but here are some videos that are interesting.

      The first one is actually from a variety show from MBC. It’s a small report about Mexican students living in South Korea. Though this doesn’t cover all Latinos and doesn’t really provide examples of stereotypes, I thought it might give some insight.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWk9qTYE7JE

      Also, from the videos I watched, if there are Latinos in Korea or Japan it is mostly men.

      This second one is about a guy from Mexico who visited Japan and interviewed a few Japanese people and their views on Mexico and the Mexican people.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgRewTQtG3o

      I hoped this helped :)

      4 years ago
    • I actually met a couple of Korean guys at a bar in Itaewon who said they were really into “Mexican” girls. So there might be a bit of ignorance about Hispanic/Latina women, but that doesn’t mean there’s not interest ;) Like S & M said, there just aren’t many there yet.

      4 years ago
    • Now I really must go!!

      4 years ago
    • I’m hispanic who lived there for a couple of years and there aren’t really any stereotypes about us. The one thing I got was Koreans always thought I was from the Philippines that or any of the other Asian countries (except for China and Japan).

      4 years ago
      • oh wow lol will probably get the same results since people here in the US used to ask me if I was asian lol

        4 years ago
        • I have been told I look somewhat Asian also, but I think that many Latinos (esp. those of Mexican descent) have some native American ancestry thus, accounting for an Asian appearance.

          4 years ago
        • I’ve been asked if I was Filipino from other Asians before going to Korea, so it didn’t come as a big surprise. I went to the Philippines and there are many people there that look Latino. ^^

          4 years ago
        • but depends of what type of latino? there are dark skinned latino but there are also mixed and white latino

          4 years ago
        • That’s true because Latinos are a very diverse people. That they can look Native, Black, White, Mulato, Asian and Mestizo.

          4 years ago
        • I agree. Except that I’m always asked if I’m hispanic/latino and I don’t have a drop of latino in my blood. I’m mixed, yes, but not with latino…lol!

          4 years ago
        • my filipino friend told me that some of them look latino because lots are mixed with spanish blood cuz of something that took place long ago. I guess makes sense, a lot of them have spanish last names, and features …including my friend xP I thought she was mixed with hispanic when i met her..nope she’s filipino :P

          4 years ago
        • Yup. The older generation had to learn Spanish. And many words in Tagalog come from Spanish.

          4 years ago
        • About us Filipinos First of all, all of us have some kind of Hispanic blood mixed in us because we were a Spanish colony. Second of all a lot of especially those that come from were the old US bases have some american blood in us. Third of all there is also a lot of chines people in the Philippines hence alot of people in Metro manila will be Filipino Chinese. Fourthly if you are a lighter brown colored Filipino like me you will be mistaken for a Thai person in Korea. Fifthly if you are a pale Filipino like my mother you will be mistaken for white unless you have Asian shaped eyes if you do the might think you are either Korean or Chinese like my cousin was. If you are just a plain old brown yes they will think your Filipino and finally if your dark skin like my father they will mistake you for being black. All of this comes from since i just visited Korea with my family for 3 weeks. P.S. To all Thai people Koreans will like you I would cite this because of Nickhun ^-^. As for the whole uneducated thing if you are a Filipino that is walking around with brand name bags and things and you speak perfect English like I do they won’t. All in all Korean people were generally nice and welcoming to my fam especially me since I am around the same skin tone as lee Hyori so a pale brown and have a pretty face according to them ( I have big eyes , double eyelids, naturally wavy hair and a v-line despite being a guy).

          4 years ago
        • There definitely is a mix of races in the Philippines. I have cousins that are half Filipino. My uncle’s ex-wife is Filipino and his current wife is Chinese-Filipino. I was also mistaken for Thai in Korea. ~.~

          4 years ago
        • As far as I can remember, that is because the Philippines were a Spanish colony back when imperialism was all the rage.

          4 years ago
    • Truthfully, there isn’t really a lot of hispanic/latina women in Korea to make a negative/positive impact. Come to Korea and make a positive impact!!! :D

      4 years ago
      • Do you think they’ll end up looking down at tall Latin women? I’m freaking tall for being Hispanic and I don’t want to freak anyone out in South Korea. :’3

        4 years ago
        • I am 5’11”, super tall. Eee! I would love to go one day. > o <

          4 years ago
        • You should come! Just tell everyone you’re a supermodel! ^_^

          4 years ago
        • Hahaha, ok! ^^

          4 years ago
        • I think it would be hard to look down on you, if you’re so tall… xD

          lol sorry couldn’t resist

          I don’t know about Korea, but most of the Asian countries I’ve lived in tend to respect tall people, and aspire to be tall – with long legs etc – especially for guys. For girls, it’s still cool; they might say you look like a model or something – but it’ll be hard to get a boyfriend. Ever seen LoveCom?

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Love_Com

          4 years ago
    • Ditto curious on that.

      4 years ago
    • curious myself :P

      4 years ago
    • That’s true! I’m wondering if the get treated like Obama skin color O.O

      4 years ago
      • not all hispanics are dark skinned. There are white people too you know

        4 years ago
        • OBVIOUSLY! what world do you live in? and they are NOT “white people” they are light skin-colored.

          4 years ago
        • There actually are hispanic white people, my skin is white not light skin-colored. I’m a spanishitalian mixture.

          4 years ago
      • “is this American king?”
        Vampire Idol moment there…

        4 years ago
  219. Alabama’s, like, errr, a city in Canada!

    4 years ago
  220. Are there any particular stereotypes related to Europeans/British people?

    4 years ago
    • wut

      since we have no clue about uk
      being gentleman for men
      but thanks to skins
      the reputation has been chaning.

      4 years ago
    • Maybe not a stereotype, but UK is called “Rock-nation” on internet community thanks to all the cool bands :)

      4 years ago
    • Judging from how I see the British flag all over the place in Korean dramas in the past year… I’m thinking being British maybe is seen as being a touch cool? I have totally gotten the 80s, early 90s music vibe from K-Pop, it’s one of the reasons I really like it, since I was a bit too young to fully enjoy the 80s :p I’m hoping it’s cool since I’m going to be in Seoul later this year with my American husband and would just love to be cooler than him, haha!

      4 years ago
    • @simonandmartina:disqus

      Please answer this! As a Brit, I see quite a lot of sort of Brit 80’s music/culture in Kpop vids, but what is it like in South Korea itself? Is it seen as badly as some Koreans see Americans?

      4 years ago
    • Mm yes, or Irish people. I hear that Koreans learn about Ireland?? I may be completely wrong. Personal experience: korean guy started to give me guff because we don’t all speak irish and our country is divided among other slurs. But yea wiped it off but the curiosity is there to know more.

      4 years ago
      • There’s a K-Drama called Ireland.

        4 years ago
        • Mm I saw the drama online but the blurb made it sound really boring, so didn’t bother watching it. hehe

          4 years ago
        • yes, that’s true, it was really boring. I gave up after a couple of episodes.
          However, the drama shows Korean awareness of Ireland, doesn’t it? :-)

          4 years ago
  221. Yes, stereotypes and racism exists everywhere. The problem with my experience in Korea is that they LEGIT buy into these stereotypes and biased opinions with no second thought at all. Once they know you are black, American, Chinese, gay, etc. they already think they “know you”. I guess its all the conformist mentality in Korea. Korea is fun…but just be warned about trying to fit in and become a respected member of society. haha.

    4 years ago
  222. I’m ok with that and it’s really interesting know how they think about foreign, thanks for this video, I’m like a mixed skin person so I think that will be fun to hear that about my color skin hahahaha nwn/! nice video!

    4 years ago
  223. poor blonde girls :/

    4 years ago
    • I wouldn’t feel too bad for them ;) For every person who thinks they are a prostitute or a sex worker, there are probably ten students or other people who really like their hair or ooh and ahh over it.

      I know when I had blonde hair I got a lot more attention (mostly positive). I now have very dark hair and fly under the radar T__T

      4 years ago
      • I agree, when I was in Japan people hardly ever noticed me since I am five foot and have dark brown hair. Other travelers I met said they experienced sitting on the trains and having others walk over and sit really far away from them when they noticed they were a foreigner, or even if it was crowded the seats on either side of them stayed empty. I NEVER experienced this. People would walk in, sit down next to me, and then glance over and suddenly realize I wasn’t Japanese.
        Also, I never got cool comments about my looks, except some people thought I was from Europe because I didn’t “look” American.

        4 years ago
  224. Stereotypes are everywhere. Even though you may not believe them, you do know them. This shouldn’t be offensive since everyone expresses stereotypes, even unconsiously.

    4 years ago
    • Much agreed. There are a lot of stereotypes in the US that I haven’t even “experienced.” Like African Americans liking watermelon and fried chicken. I have yet to have any black friends who particularly like watermelon. Funny thing is that my sister in law get mad at that stereotype because she Jamaican and therefore it doesn’t apply to her. But it cracks me up because one of her favorite foods is fried chicken. XD

      4 years ago
    • is that P.O. in your avatar?

      4 years ago
    • Shouldn’t be offensive, I know, but people are in the habit of taking offence when no one’s giving offence..

      4 years ago
      • Yeah… I used to be crazy PC just so I wouldn’t offend anyone (I grew up in an all white area so I wasn’t sure how to act when it came to stereotypes.) But for some people if you become really close with someone who is considered a minority and they have a healthy sense of humor you realize stereotypes aren’t a big deal as long as no one gets stupid about it.

        4 years ago
        • I agree, but sometimes stereotypes and racism can lead to bigger problems- like the recent happenings in Texas. I think it can be an important issue when rights and equalities are at stake.. :c

          4 years ago
        • Well said. I cannot stand politically correct people; they take the fun out of making fun of stereotypes. I have experienced smart hints of racism here and there (who hasn’t; even white people do sometimes >_>), but I think it’s more funny than offensive. I make fun of stereotypes because they’re ridiculous to hold onto into this day and age.

          4 years ago
        • Do you think it’s an Australian thing to make fun of stereotypes though? I remember I while back when someone cracked a racist Asian joke at me, and while I was stunned, my Asian friend gently told me, “He means no harm, just call him a stupid white person, and all is well.” :p

          So I’ve learn that in order to cope in Australia, when people insult you, just jokingly insult them back, and you’ll be best mates 4 LYFE!! xD

          4 years ago
        • Unless I’m the only American that does it, I assume that making fun of stereotypes is *not* only an Australian thing :3 Ofc, I have gotten more than my fair share of funny looks when one of my white friends chucks the n word at me, and I call him a cracker XD

          4 years ago
        • ummm… thats not funny. Its one thing to joke about stereotypes and another thing to find it acceptable for someone to call you a racial slur. You must really have some racial identity issues. I really feel sorry for you and whatever low self-esteem you may suffer from. As a person that is mixed with many nationalities and looks black I would never tolerate that kind of treatment even out of jest. You have obviously not experienced discrimination that many minorities face in America(I have). It may seem funny now but if they say it to your face I cant imagine what they have said behind your back. so..yeah ill pass on being referred to at that n from xxx street.

          4 years ago
        • Um… While I completely understand your first statement about racial slurs not being funny, it is also insulting to insinuate that someone (who you don’t know and may never meet) has racial identity issues and suffers from low self esteem. Those kinds of comments are not respectful at all, especially seeing that we are dealing with a sensitive topic and some people deal with those kinds of words in different ways. Whether or not you approve is your business but please, refrain from telling people who you don’t know about aspect of their character.

          And Josh, unless you are going to respond in a respectful manner I would prefer if you ignore those aspect of this person’s comments. What I have seen of your character suggests that you are a pretty easy going person but I know sometimes personal ( and unprovoked) attacks like that are hard to respond to in a non defensive way.

          I don’t use the n word or any other racial slurs. However, I do realise that some people use them ( note the current furor over Paula Deen in the US). I don’t see that as being politically correct but just having manners.

          4 years ago
        • People that tolerate that kind of treatment generally have some of those issues. So yes, it might have been hasty of me to generalize him. However, for me there is no possible situation where it is okay to call someone the n word or any other racial slur.

          4 years ago
        • Very well said yellowjc26. It is one thing to expose the ignorance of stereotypes through witty humor, satire etc but, allowing those around you to engage in course jesting that encourages the stereotypes is not something any person who wants to be treated with respect should engage in or tolerate.

          4 years ago
        • Oh and my bf got me watching Gabriel Iglesias aka “Fluffy” a lot too… he has a way of saying it like it is but making people feel comfortable about it :)

          4 years ago
        • Aw thanks :) I talk about race a lot now with my bf who is half Filipino-half white… it’s kind of hard to avoid since it’s such an important topic in his family (my bf’s 6’4″ white dad and 4’10” Filipino mother tend stick out a lot.) But it’s always been important to me because I find being in an all white neighborhood or town boring… when I went to college I was in heaven, University of Michigan is extremely diverse so I got have friends of every color and with lots of accents thrown in there :) I still remember walking around campus and hearing different languages spoke on campus quite a bit…

          4 years ago
        • :D GO BLUE!

          4 years ago
        • Go Buckeyes! trololololol ;D

          4 years ago
        • Buckeye city right here baaaaaaybeeeee!!

          4 years ago
        • Damn straight. Bleed scarlet and grey 4 lyfe

          4 years ago
        • Variety really is the spice of life ^^ I think if I was in a place that was all black, I’d be terribly bored. Not to say that black culture is bad (it’s really awesome, and I’m totes not biased when I say that ;3), it’s just that I like a lot of of the differences in cultures. It’s a bit hard for me to explain, but I get what you’re saying :D

          4 years ago
        • I get what you’re saying too :) Nothing against white people but I just prefer being around various kinds of people with bigger range of backgrounds ;) Plus I love accents…. not in a fetish kind of way (well maybe a tiny bit) but I just love hearing accents and other languages.

          It’s like music to me… even random accents that Americans don’t hear as much. I used to have a bf that was Persian and my friends did not understand what I loved about his accent… I was excited to hear a voice that I don’t hear often :)

          4 years ago
      • btw this video was very very interesting! Thank you so much, one of my fav. TL:DR

        4 years ago
      • Yeah that’s true, didn’t think about that.

        4 years ago
  225. Hey guys! Thanks for this insight! I was wondering if you knew of any stereotypes or discrimination of South Asians (Indians) in Korea? Thanks!

    4 years ago
    • Ok. So then, how do Koreans refer to people from India?

      4 years ago
    • ZING! Stere-o-typed! Sorry, couldn’t resist….. I’ll go sit over here…….

      ps. It has actually been a really really really long time since I had to specify “East Indian” to someone here in Canada, for the other, most people say “Native” or “Anishnabe” or the actual tribe they are referrring to. w00t! Progress.

      4 years ago
    • In my experience, they didn’t really think bad or good about South Asian people. haha. There are a lot of South Asians doing graduate work at the universities and I wouldn’t say they have it worse or better off than other types of foreigners when it comes to making friends/living. Again, this is just my experience/perceptions.

      4 years ago
      • Thank you! I’m planning to visit SK with my friend in the following year, but I was afraid of what I’d have to face as an Indian there. I know they seem to have some stereotypes about how we dress, etc, as you’ve maybe seen in the 4minute parody or b2st’s version of mystery.

        4 years ago
    • Hi Gyuie!

      Thanks but Indians as in from India, we aren’t talking about Native Indians who are Stereotyped as Pocahontas

      4 years ago
      • I know… what I mean is that ppl in Korea would think of Pocahontas when they hear the word “Indian” bcuz we use different terms when speaking of “a person from India”. We say “Indo-saram”

        4 years ago
      • Hi Pynk, as Gyuie said India is not well known as we don’t have big Indian population in Korea, but we generally think India as very spiritual country, where you’re likely to bump into a wise old monk on a public bus or sth. Oh and people might think you don’t use cutlery when you dine, so has a designated hand for eating & try to keep it clean all the time. Hope you find my comments funny not offensive, if I have written anything inappropriate!!!

        4 years ago
        • hehe that’s awesome! Thanks :)

          4 years ago
    • YES I would like to know as well please!!!

      4 years ago