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CL “The Baddest Female” – Kpop Music Mondays

June 4, 2013

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So, we’ve got a lot to say here for this week’s Kpop Music Monday. If you haven’t seen CL’s “The Baddest Female” yet, check it out here:

Ok: we’re quite torn about this song and the imagery in the video. I could be totally wrong here, and might have an out of date perspective, so please let me know – in a civil manner – if I’m off here. Here goes:

When I think of rap videos, they usually depict a culture, rather than just an aesthetic. Like “this is what our lives are like. This is what we go through.” Rap music, to me, is more than just music. There’s an overarching narrative of coping and dealing with systematic racism, racial profiling by the police, and economic struggles. At least, that’s what I think of when I listen to rap. I could be wrong in that; I could be seeing something that isn’t necessarily there, and so my conclusions based on those assumptions could then be unfounded. If I’m right, then, to see YG and CL use that specific aesthetic, which kinda symbolizes something more to me than just something that looks cool, I feel a bit icky. The people of YG, I doubt, went through that struggle, so to imitate the genre, aesthetic, and imagery so closely really hits me as insincere. Innocent? Sure! Malicious? No way. I’m sure that there’s a genuine appreciation of rap as an artform, but an understanding of it as a culture?

Also, there aren’t any hoods here in Korea. Nobody here is hood. Nobody in Korea really dresses that way. And we’ve asked lots of people about it. Nobody knows where these hoods are, apart from in the YG studio. Hence the skit we did. Side note: did you know that at Teddy’s Twosome Café, you can buy Teddy’s clothing line as well? The same kinda clothing: hats, beanies, t-shirts. Buy yourself a thug-life oversized tee, with a matching Tumbler, and eat a piece of Tiramisu as people snuggle up behind you and look into each other’s eyes lovingly.

So, all in all, I’m not sure what to think about this. YG has re-appropriated Gangsta life into something different. Something that had meaning to me before I see now, in Korea, as a commercial enterprise. Not that I lived through the same conditions oppression that I talked about before. I’m not talking about it as someone who’s personally offended or upset. I’m just confused by the whole thing, like the commercialization of Christmas or something. I can’t come to a full conclusion about it on my own, so let me know what you think.

All seriousness aside, you wanna hear an awkward story? That last part of the Gangsta Amnesty skit, where we filmed outside of the YG building…well, we filmed that right when office hours were closing, so lots of people were leaving the building. While we were filming, one person ran up to us and said “Simon and Martina!” Great. We were recognized. I didn’t think we’d be, especially with the Gangsta uniform I had on, but I was recognized. The person who recognized us was someone from YG who sent us tickets to the YG family concert a while ago. She remembered us! AHH! So, there we were, in gangsta gear, talking to one of the marketing people from YG. HAVE WE NO SHAME OR EMBARRASSMENT? Yeah, a bit. We talked with her a bit and explained what we’re doing for the skit, and she asked when the video’s going to be live, and we told her, and in the back of our minds we’re thinking “well, we’re not really saying the nicest things about the song and video. This is going to get a lot more awkward when the video goes live.” AHHH! IF YOU’RE READING THIS, YG LADY WHO I WON’T NAME, I HOPE YOU DON’T HATE US! We’d still like to hang out in Hongdae! To everyone else who isn’t the YG Lady, let it never be said that we’re dishonest in our videos!

Side note: you love that Spudgy song, don’t you? I know people are going to be asking about it, so we put it up in our store. Yes! We have a store now! We’re working on putting up all our shirts, and new shirts as well, along with all of the songs that we do. All purchases of Spudgy songs go directly to the Spudgy Touch-My-Tummy fund. Click here if you want to get The Baddest Doggy! It’s the extended version, with parts not heard in the video :D

And, lastly, we’ve got a bunch of bloopers, especially when Martina says something inappropriate accidentally…

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CL “The Baddest Female” – Kpop Music Mondays

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  1. You couldn’t be further from the truth, “hoods ” exist within Seoul outside of gangnam rich district, not to mention underground listeners in North Korea, Mongolia, China, Japan, etc…rap/hip hop was a form of political expression and youth struggles. in my opinion Kpop captures it beautiful while American hip hop has lost itself and celebrates drug selling.

    I kinda wish ppl would stop lumping it all as Kpop since many artist like MISS A have put out some good R&B music as well. I think the Kpop definition needs to end. Korean Artist have proven themselves capable across all genre’s of music, it is the American listeners who are turning xenophobic against Koreans especially hip hop fans. Who turn up their nose when they hear other ppl express themselves.

    In Case you’re living under a rock Seoul is the break dancing capital of the world. they have really embrace the essence and love of urban culture while Americans have become obsessed with “thug” image only.

    When you demand that certain forms of music can only be done if you are of that culture/race then you have become a racist. Ppl live hard lives everywhere, Black Americans do not have a monopoly on bad luck and hard times.

    Check out the docu film Mongolian Bling..it will open your eyes.

    2 years ago
  2. THAT is the last word on this issue, I’d say. And we have been doing it for far longer and to a far larger extent than KPop.

    3 years ago
  3. brilliant. and it isn’t. and people will come to it in their own time.

    3 years ago
  4. plus everyone is too busy updating their FB status to even realize there are messages that still need to be told.

    3 years ago
  5. I hear you – gotta say tho – you said it yourself – the genre is commercialized differently in the US nowadays and that’s what they’re seeing – modern rap – we don’t have as much of the strong, deep, undercurrents in our Rap like we used to. Either because there is not as much of a need for it since the issues are not as bad as it used to be, or just because no one has had the opportunity to get popular enough to reach other countries with real, old school, rap in the last decade or so. Plus, people’s interests have shifted, even those living 2014 version of ‘the thug life’ are equipped with tech more often than not. Basically, can’t blame KPop for staying current.
    Notice the rappers you named are all in their 30s now.. Plus, 2NE1, especially, seems to be all about blending diff genres and daring to perhaps offend in their songs. Otherwise they really really really have no business including Reggae in their songs! But I like that they do because I see it as something different than the Reggae I am used to hearing here. Not bad, nor mockery, just different. (and of course they’d use it – they’re not deaf – a good sound is a good sound!)

    3 years ago
  6. i was with you all the way til “sadly”. Nothing sad about it not being relevant anymore. It’s good that these controversies have come soo close to resolution and so many fewer people’s lives are affected by racism and we have the freedom now to waste our time on talking about brands, drinks, riches. i’m sure you didn’t mean to say “sadly” there.

    3 years ago
    • yea but other genres are stepping up and doing so. Can’t really be hard on CL for what she says in her rap – can’t single rap out – to need to stay traditional when all other genres are changing constantly. Although I agree that music can bring light to issues, but how many people do you know that have ever heard Ice Cube’s ‘Black Korea’ or Tupac’s ‘Hellrazor’. Instead, people will remember the news articles and later the TV covers of the awful mess that was the riots in 92. People who like and listen to rap may have heard the songs, but bets face it – its media that brings light to things and although music can, can we really look down on musicians who don’t. As someone who likes rap – I’m just glad new stuff is coming out and if it’s more meaningful, all the better. This song isn’t one I particularily like, but I like 2NE1 in general because they are not afraid to cross boundaries and bring all kinds of genres into their songs. The must know some people would dislike them for it, but they do it anyway and I gotta respect them as long as they keep bringing different things together.

      3 years ago
  7. haha yeaaa about the clothes in that setting!! lolol but to be fair, not like our rap songs were all realistic in their vids either :/

    3 years ago
  8. I agree they lack the same authenticity – they are borrowing some visual bits. Instead I think in Korea, they may not have ‘thug’ as we do here in the US, but they sure as hell have gone through and are still going through difficulties. I mean, for one, they are still actively at war with their neighbors. Maybe they haven’t been through the hood, but every single male has to go into Military – that’s a different kind of hardship and a danger unto itself. They don’t talk about it in their songs, but I bet they don’t forget about it easily. There has been a shift in the US too, about Rap, can’t find authntic old school rap much anymore – now we get the weed, hoes, and cars crap instead – but can’t be mad – something must be going right for a lot of people.

    3 years ago
  9. someone please define hood and gangsta for me. I grew up in a bad area near Boston, shoes hangin on like every telephone line, cops always around, people shot a few feet from my apartment’s front door… is that “hood”? Really?
    And rappers may have come from poverty or other difficult situations in life, but many have not. I don’t think being poor is a pre-req for being a good rapper. And if you wanna talk poverty, plenty of Korean Celebs have experienced their share (ever read up on Rain’s background?). so I don’t think it boils down to economics either. I’m not so sure about 2NE1, but I think anyone who can do it, should. How about not defining things just to meet some assumed stereotype from the 90s? I think that what’s ‘gangsta ‘ is changing. I, for one, don’t go around telling people I lived in the hood, walked past projects almost every day, etc. I just think of it as a low-income area my family was stuck in for a while. These days, I encounter people telling me that I’m in a gangsta place, but honestly, they just label it gangsta so they don’t have to feel bad about blasting base in the middle of the night or hollering like banshees whenever it suits them. But there is no violence and everyone still has their iPhone and wifi hook up. Gangsta used to mean “don’t look the wrong person in the eye or you get shot”, but I’ve discovered that even in wife beaters and baggy jeans, 2 black, 30-something, rough looking guys can be totally friendly and chill if you approach em with the right attitude. Living in low-income (what you might call “hood”) just means you grow up with different ideals and goals and priorities. Korea not having hoods, I don’t understand that.. There is plenty of poverty there too. There are dangers and alcohol abuse and such there too. Thankfully, you don’t see many people carrying guns, but the potential for it is certainly there.
    I think that songs like CL’s and BIGBANG’s ‘La La La’ may be just as ‘hood’ as they want them to be. Nevermind the labels – they are just a crutch. Living in a bad area, its easy to fall into thinking “im in ‘da hood’ now, gonna be all gangsta and nevermind school or work or whatever” – that’s a crutch. And an outdated one at that. Life is a struggle. Even filthy rich can find themselves with “hood” mentality if “hood” is to mean “oppression” and “coping and dealing with systematic racism, racial profiling by the police, and economic struggles”. In fact, those def can apply to anyone at any time. The word ‘hood’ just has its own weight and mindset that weighs on you, when you’re better off without it. Kudos to KPop for making rap look colorful and bright! Is about time we expand our minds and step out from labels.

    3 years ago
  10. Simon the hood is somewhere here. Here’s to hope

    http://youtu.be/IBK0nvJlfgw

    3 years ago
  11. I’m with you guys on this one. It grows on you but for the most part…I DON’T like it. LOL Its got it good point but mostly…NOT!!! Thanks for the on-the-scene reporting on the Gangster was just looking for a place to be himself. I’m glad he’s going back to be a Wigger. My daughter is a Wigger! No really, she makes AWESOME WIGS!!!!
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=419818188111451&set=t.1413460815&type=3&theater (she’s in the middle but basically makes pretty much all the stuff you see, and more!) Thanks for that plug! LOL But seriously!

    4 years ago
  12. What video did Martina mention that CL stole her hairstyle? I thought it was funny but I can’t find it!

    4 years ago
  13. I just checked out “Princess of China.” I think it should be renamed Asian princess. It has way too many different Asian cultures. (seriously, ninjas?) Also, Rihanna is nowhere near Chinese.

    I think YG was trying to show a badass image that is simliar to what is seen in American rap mvs. It may have gotten liked by Korean kpop fans (i’m guessing. please don’t hurt me), but it might not have attracted the international listeners that have knowledge as to what rap music is like.

    4 years ago
  14. Glad to see I am not the only person who didn’t care for this song. I actually turned it off before it finished. Ugh.
    Loved the review though! So nice to start my day off with something funny. Gansta Spudgy was bad ass! Bad in a good way, not a bad dog…. XD
    As for the battle of solo songs: Park Bom without a doubt.

    4 years ago
  15. Your comment really expresses how I was feeling whilst reading the blog post for this KMM. “But.. YG does this all the time..?”

    Both yours and @Rabby’s comments were worded eloquently and politely, and I’m grateful for your opinions, as well as Simon and Martina’s. It’s nice to know we can have these kinds of discussions without anyone claiming to be “butthurt” (oh how I have come to loathe the phrase) or bashing on the latter.

    4 years ago
  16. Kim

    did soozee dye her hair?

    4 years ago
  17. MG

    This was one of my concerns here. that Martina’s fans would thinks it’s ok to use a word that is laced with racist innuendos. Especially here, younger fans and ones not to familiar with American slang or culture. I’m not saying you fit into that category but this was one of my main concerns after hearing Martina use it. That word is neither cool nor funny. It’s actually a word an English teacher should of been ashamed to use.

    4 years ago
    • MG

      I don’t think you or even Martian’s original comment was made with intent to belittle or shame anyone. But I do believe that words can hurt people they might not hurt you they might not even hurt most people but words can hurt. Or they could just really piss someone off. I know on the internet it’s easy to be offensive because you don’t have to look at someone in the eyes while saying something. Like I doubt Martina would use the word wigger in front a group of black friends and be comfortable saying it. This also applies to me. I would also have a more difficult time telling Martina face to face that I absolutely hated her using that word.

      4 years ago
  18. I’ll admit I like the song “Princess of China” but didn’t like the music video. Rihanna cannot pass for a Chinese Princess, plus she was wearing a kimono which is Japanese. And then the imagery with her 8 arms (I guestimate) isn’t even Asian, it’s East Asian. That video was quite the let down for me. I don’t think most people are hurt because YG portrays American hiphop in this video. YG has used American hiphop imagery in their videos way before this video. It’s the use of American Gang culture to show how “bad as in good” CL is that doesn’t sit well with some. To portray it in a positive light is wrong on so many levels. And I agree with you, America has distorted symbols in many cultures (not just Asian).

    4 years ago
  19. I see where you’re coming from Simon on the whole rap/hip hop culture misuse YG seems to be doing. It’s annoying to me but I usually just shrug it off. Just like the kids from back in high school who I labeled as “wannabe gangsters”, that’s how I see some YG artists (and a few others in Kpop who go for that concept – it’s not all just YG) at times. But there are some things they do and symbols & words they use that I’m not quite sure they’re fully aware what they actually mean. And this just makes them appear as idiots. It’s laughable sometimes. I’m for people who are real and have a handle on who they are. Many in Kpop who hold onto the rap/hip hop culture image appear very fake and completely ignorant of what it really is, therefore I don’t care for these Kpoppers. I respect their talent, yes, but I’d respect them a lot more as people if they weren’t trying to “be cool.”

    4 years ago
  20. I wish your kind of comment was being posted by more people; it’s totally normal in today’s global media market for different cultures to reappropriate images and aesthetics to suit their own styles and needs. Yes, it distorts them from the original, but that’s okay too. It’s like saying Koreans (or any culture other than African-American) shouldn’t be able to sing the Blues for similar reasons, in my opinion. Where do you really draw the line, and who gets to decide? Why is it such a bad thing for it to enter into the mainstream pop diet, when listeners might eventually find their way back to the roots and be intrigued by that as well? I personally don’t see a problem with it.

    All of that being said, this was not my favourite song, it sounded like too many others (GD, or even “You Got Some Nerve” by Junhyung, Feeldog and LE – which I LOVED), and felt a bit muddled… My point is that I’m not trying to protect CL and her song, and making an argument for the sake of that – but that it’s happening EVERYWHERE, not just Korea, in K-pop or with YG. And the guy who is, in my opinion, the king of hip-hop and rap in Korea, Jay Park… Where does he stand in all of this? Does he have more claim to it all because he grew up in America, as a part of a minority? What of bringing it back to Korea? I think this argument raised more questions than it answered.

    I guess the tough part in all of this is that S&M might be presenting their views as they have them – but the truth is that many of the discussions they have with their fans may also change those perspectives. Unfortunately, as time goes on, their views in their videos are frozen in time, while their own opinions may have altered. I hope fans won’t judge them too harshly when their opinions differ (so far discussions seem to be quite peaceful here! ^_^) because S&M are likely still growing and learning, too.

    4 years ago
  21. NAEGA OOLF! NAEGA OOLF! Thank you for that. I needed to not be alone in that anymore.

    4 years ago
  22. G-Dragon did mentioned he wanted to be “naked” as his next fashion concept though…. xD

    4 years ago
  23. Awesome KMM! I do agree that YG is pushing to hard on the “gangsta” concept. To be honest, they haven’t done really good hip-hop tracks/concepts since 1TYM and old Big Bang songs. With the exception of G-Dragon’s “One of a Kind” (though it sounded like something Lil Wayne would do… o.O), YG’s “gangsta” concept seemed… plastic now. >w<

    4 years ago
  24. omg, gangster spudgy… <3

    i'm definitely voting for CL against Park Bom cuz she's way sassier!!! Park Bom sings well and she's super pretty, but she can't act!

    4 years ago
  25. Alright, I’m willing to admit it, even though I didn’t really like the song, dammit if I wasn’t humming the chorus at various points of my day. It’s an ear worm.

    4 years ago
  26. I totally noticed that!

    4 years ago
  27. I actually didn’t notice that GD wasn’t wearing any pants until I read the comments. I was too transfixed on CL xD

    4 years ago
  28. i wud have been really weird analysing the video since… there’s nothing to analyse. the video was too mashed up and random and just strange places with stranger clothes… i really liked the gangsta amnesty! i laffed a lot!
    All in all, i’m not a fan of CL, but i actually expected an awesome video with sick beats… i got pretty disappointed… it was like a randomer, girl version of GD’s mvs… -_-

    4 years ago
  29. I think you guys should go on a quest for the true Korean hood. Who knows, maybe you might find something… similar? Maybe it’s in another city. xD

    4 years ago
  30. *Not related to song whatsoever*

    Aren’t you guise happy that people can actually discuss an MV like this with maturity and an open mind?? That’s why I always go to your blog post cause I learn from people’s opinion and experiences and less of those “OMG YOU ARE SO WRONG CL IS THE BEST”.

    (Most) Nasties Rock!! :D

    4 years ago
  31. These clearly are subjects that awoke disqussion :D For me it doesn’t bother that much if kpop rapping doesn’t have deep meaning.. mostly the singing doesn’t have either! I love good lyrics and messages but they are rare candy in now-days music (well indiemusic probaply has better messages). I haven’t quite much ever listened rap about social issues and things like that so before kpop rap was for me “big booty hoes” and after kpop.. well I realised that it’s possible to rap about love and things like that too. So.. I kind of draw krap higher (even idol rap) than rap that western world produce ^^;

    4 years ago
  32. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QK8mJJJvaes

    I’m using Macklemore as an example of how I feel about this video. To me, rap and hip hop have recently been enveloping a lot of different messages and cultural trends. Macklemore, Lil Wayne, Nicki Minaj, Common, and the Lonely Island all use rap but in totally contrasting ways. This new trend of variety has evolved from the way it was in the 90s, as Simon was saying, when the music itself was a message because most rap and hip hop revolved around a central theme. Macklemore and CL are examples of today’s way more diverse rap and hip hop in which the musical style (rap/hip hop) is simply a tool to get a message across. I think where it gets weird is when the video shows a gangster lifestyle that CL is most likely not a part of. But again, the Lonely Island (a comedic musical group who were once on SNL) also use that imagery but in an ironic/making fun of the lifestyle kind of way. So, what exactly is CL doing? She is using the imagery not in an ironic way but in order to boost her image. She wants to be seen as “bad” and tough so that gangster imagery was chosen to portray it. Is this wrong? To me, it is simply silly and makes me laugh, but I can see where it’s off-putting to others. She’s using imagery that she is not associated with just to create a certain image. However, just like the use of rap and hip hop has changed, so has the use of gangster lifestyle imagery.

    What do you think?

    4 years ago
    • Good point about the evolution of rap beyond just the “gansta”, and that it has been so for a long time. I mean, heck, Matisyahu anyone?! As I read your post, I instantly thought “true, but CL is deliberately invoking the gansta image” and as such she’s inviting criticism of her total lack of hood cred and the borderline offensive way she has appropriated it and mixed it in with the usual cotton candy sugar image traditional in kpop. However, you went on to point out exactly that, so kudos! ;)

      I still think it’s inappropriate to ape the “gansta lifestyle” unless you’re doing it in a satirical way like Ludacris’ famous “Stand Up” video, but even then he pulls it off because he does have legit cred in that lifestyle. To me, this was as tone-deaf as the chubby anime nerds who own fake katanas and wear dragonball-z shirts and claim to be “japanese on the inside” etc. Yes, it’s silly and we laugh, but deep down, it’s a bit offensive to the culture they are mimicking. Know what I mean?

      4 years ago
      • :D Matisyahu is a great example! This post made me laugh so much! And good point with Ludacris, too. And yes, I totally know what you mean. CL is mixing up a strange brew and it can totally be seen as distasteful. I’m just thinking that so many people from all different cultures are taking on these gangster images that it’s slowly becoming a new norm. Maybe not an acceptable and non-offensive one, though!

        4 years ago
  33. For this one I have to disagree…guys, why so serious? Probably they don’t know what rap/hip hop culture really is, but to me it doesn’t make a problem…kpop is about images and concepts…it is also extremly graphic- oriented…going too deeply in the things doesn’t suit it…Simon and Martina you were the first to teach me this! So, let’s not take the thing too seriously! ^_^
    About the song, it is not bad, nor extremely good…but I sing it a lot, because I find it cute and catchy.

    4 years ago
  34. My opinion of this song… well, it felt very GD-ish. :P
    It wasn’t so good, but it wasn’t awful either, so I guess it will grow on me. Something tell me though that she will rock this song in future concerts, like she always does on stage. But I don’t think I will listen to it with headphones with my mp3-player and such… Because the video was very entertaining, but if you only listen… I don’t know. :( I actually feel pretty disappointed. I don’t know why though. She loves her song and I’m happy for her. :)
    I somehow looked forward to amazing rap-parts in this song (because she’s really good, she is!) but at the same time, I ‘knew’ that she wouldn’t rap in this song. I guess I was right, because I can’t really hear any of it. Too bad, because I think that was what most of us Blackjacks had been waiting for. Or maybe not, I don’t know, I can’t speak for everyone, can I?
    In 2NE1’s upcoming album, I really hope that we will hear some hip-hop beats again, some CL and Minzy rap (it’s been a while since, right?) and amazing hit songs like ‘I am the best’, ‘Fire’ and ‘Can’t Nobody’.

    4 years ago
  35. Sky

    You guys are awesome!
    Everyone in my city is a rapper, singer or trying to be. Rap culture isn’t dead but its been commercialized and made palatable for the masses. It is true that the point of rap music is to describe your life, sometimes it becomes what you want your life to be- but the best rappers talk about what they know.
    I don’t have a problem with the rapping, i just have a problem with the “swagger jacking” they are attempting to do. There are backpack rappers who don’t claim to be hard, because that isn’t who they are… I hope YG artists could get that through their heads.

    Now for the mess CL has created, it has been evident for some time now that she thinks she’s hood (remember her ghetto accent) and i think it’s hilarious. Drop her off on the east side of Detroit where people really look like the folks in her video and see what she does. lol.

    4 years ago
  36. Oddly, what bothers you about this song is actually what I like about it. I don’t particularly like the whole “gangster” rap thing you see in the US because it has so much underlying culture. And to me, it’s not really a culture that should be celebrated. The problems you were talking about of being poor and racism etc, are seemingly made worse by that culture, not really better. They celebrate it and encourage others to emulate it. However /rant – I like this song because in Korea you don’t have that culture. They can take the appearance of the gangster culture (which sometimes does look awesome) without having the gangster culture. They can also take the excellence of some rap and turn it into something great here, without having to be giving props to one gang or another or causing shootings or whatever (although some fans can get crazy!). Anyway – just my opinion, I know many won’t agree.

    4 years ago
  37. I’m a big fan of 2ne1 and I love their music and singing skills, but this is just disappointing! I really thought CL’s song was gonna be in 2ne1’s style, this was just a slower ver. of “one of a kind” …yg waeeeeee~ EYK great job!

    4 years ago
  38. I completely understand where you guys are coming from. This sort of hip-hop gangsta life is something I had a hard time accepting with asian pop. But I guess my issue is why mention it now? It has been going on for years. I remember being crushed when my favorite kpop group Baby V.O.X released Xctasy. It was their “attempt” to break out in the US market. Basically producers saw images of “gangsta” and “hip-hop” culture and dressed the girls up. American’s like 2PAC? Let’s buy rights to an unreleased rap and put it in the song. American’s won’t find that offensive? Right?

    I think also we need to think about the context of how hip-hop enters other countries. For example I remember doing a report about rap & hip-hop in Japan. Basically the movement became popular not necessarily because of music being imported, but more so because of break dancing. Because break dancing was so popular some people started to learn how to DJ to make music to dance to, then came in the rappers. Because of this rap became about something different. It wasn’t about rap battles, or talking about how hard life is. I hear Japanese rap being a lot more light hearted and goofy is anything.

    That said I don’t know much about the HISTORY of Korean rap. From what I can see, it seems that there are more Korean Americans who paved the way for the movement so Korean rap is probably more “traditional” to the original American movement. I had a hard time swallowing YG when I first got into Kpop because unlike Japanese hip-hop (which kind-of carved it’s own definition), it was TOO much like American culture without the substance. G-Dragon rapping about Korean Baseball? Se7en with his backwards cap slinging a chain? Get out! I had to ignore the image and just listen to the music. I think the modern stuff I have accepted because hip-hop in Korea has sort of carved it’s own identity. T.O.P and G-Dragon have a unique image that I am not sure would even work in the US, but I feel like would be respected.

    That said I wish CL did something else with her imagery. I think her song is relevant to modern Korea. Women are gaining a lot more respect and empowerment. I think women should take pride in themselves and be more vocal about it. I wish the video was less about swag and looking cool and more about strong women, strong women in KOREA.

    Oh and GD without pants, maybe it was just a joke on saggy pants. His just fell off.

    4 years ago
  39. Agree with you on a LOT of levels.

    “I understand that hip hop culture has such a vast history but why can’t kpop draw influences from it.”

    “They’ve drawn influence from sooo many other parts of western culture on pure face value why should hip hop be the taboo that everyone gets angsty about.”

    THANK YOU…

    4 years ago
  40. Your definition of rapping is already useless. If that’s how you define rapping, well that doesn’t exist anymore. You’re not gonna find real rappers even in America (with a few exceptions). In this decade, rapping has already become just a style and not a reflection of culture/experiences of some sort. And I find it unfair that you guys wasted your review of CL’s MV with that. GD’s One of A Kind and other “Hip Hop” songs from YG have been released before yet you guys never complained about that. So as BAP’s Warrior and etc. How come you pointed that out now? It kinda feels like you have nothing to talk about the song and MV itself so you wasted the review by complaining about S.K making Hip Hop as just fashion and bling bling.

    4 years ago
  41. Honestly, one of the problems with the video for me was the use of balaclavas. Having grown up in the UK during the aftermath of the Troubles (my mum had to take special lessons in case of bombs, etc. as she worked for the government), and being part Northern Irish, it’s not…tasteful. I saw that part of the video and I was actually a little shocked. I get that it might be “bad” meaning good to someone else, but to me it was just bad. And scary.

    (also, don’t say “wigger”. That’s bad meaning bad bad bad naughty no no.)

    4 years ago
  42. Martina Daenerys Tagaeryen- i hope i spelled that right, that was funny until i thought of the episode 9 of Season 3 and went back into depression, Game of Thrones why????
    Anyway i vote Park Bom!!

    4 years ago
  43. Is it really necessary to depict EXO fans as blubbering morons every time you mention them in your videos? There’s a lot of articulate fans who aren’t anything like that, tyvm.

    4 years ago
    • That character is not an “EXO” fan but an “Oppa” fan. She comes out for practically all boy groups – not just EXO. This is the B1A4 Review where Seungrina has an entire skit starting at 2:04 and lasts for over a minute. “She” is also a VIP. As a VIP and BANA, I am not taking it personally.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNFq2M3DBtc

      4 years ago
      • Does that make it any better though? Fangirls are always portrayed as hysterical airheads by society, and considering the fact that the majority of EYK viewers are fangirls themselves, it’s even more inappropriate to insult people in that way. This might be one type of fangirl they’re mocking, but it’s essentially making fun of all fangirls by using the “stupid girl” stereotype for a skit.

        4 years ago
        • You make a good point about the mocking, but… on the other hand Simon and Martina aren’t known for being politically correct, making nice and tend to make fun of everything including fangirls. Seungrina just happens to be the character they have been using a lot recently, because she seems to be lots of fun and is popular. She even hosts her own show and Simon thinks she’s sexy.
          :-p

          If you do find it upsetting then perhaps then their type of humour is not for you.

          Cheers
          Natz

          4 years ago
  44. hmm or maybe YG needs to step away frm being a little superficial and sing about some of the problems faced in their country (u know like bullying, commit suicide, high number of plastic surgery). not just the ‘hood’.

    but i still like CL’s baddest female.

    4 years ago
  45. Oh Martina said ‘f***er’ accidentally and YOU DIDN’T BLEEP IT OUT! tsk.

    On another note, Spudgy is so cute.

    4 years ago
  46. Park Bom ^^

    4 years ago
  47. Sooooo agree with you on this one!!! To be honest when I heard that CL’s solo was going to be produced by Teddy all I could think of was “this is going to sound like any other 2ne1 song”……and when it didn’t it was mmmm dissapointing?. I do believe that all the artist that work at YG have at least a minimum understanding of what the hip hop culture means so I’m not even going to go there, but what surprised me was the “half way there” feeling I get everytime I listen to the song. The tune sure is catchy but the lyrics…..man the lyrics kill it for me. How come you would let a guy write about how bad ass you are from your perspective if he is not you? it could be because the idol image she has to mantain but then you read her lyrics in GD’s “The Leaders” and well, for me there’s a huge difference and her persona shines through. The imaginary of the MV made it worst for me, kinda all over the place and trying to show to much without saying to much either. I’m a YG stan but I wouldn’t have release this song as a first solo single (of course is not up to me or any of us for that matter but you know), I don’t think it has the quality that the baddest female deserves.

    4 years ago
  48. I agree with all what you wrote but, to be fair, a great bunch of new rappers in the weast are doing exactly the same. CL’s videos actually reminded me of them.

    The song is really bad and the lyrics aren’t really worth praising so I’ll leave it at that.

    4 years ago
  49. “It’s capitalism materialism. It’s just hip hop becoming successful. And as any genre of music becomes successful, it becomes debased because it buys into general tenor of the culture.”
    ~Dan Charnas in “Interview Doctrine: Rap Materialism and Racial Humility” (youtube it)

    I don’t think you have to have the specific experience in order to use certain style. You do however have to have a certain respect. And while most of YG probably has lead lives with a certain amount of privilege, I don’t think we can comment on whether or not they’ve had the “right” experience to qualify them. Let’s take Teddy. Though he has spent most of his life in Korea, he did live in NYC and Cali in the late 80’s and 90’s. A time heavy on anti-Asian American sentiments, specifically Korean American. With inter-racial conflicts starting NYC and LA bleeding out. I can’t comment on Teddy’s personal experiences, but it was not a easy time to have an Asian face in American. To a degree it still isn’t.

    4 years ago
  50. LOL. I live in Michigan and we always joke that Canada doesn’t really have hoods. Like Toronto the streets are just so clean. I agree with everything you said about this song, Simon. When CL was standing up against the wall in the “frisk” position, I was like does she even know what that means? Because in most American videos, that represents police harassment/oppression. Plus in the states, if you can’t back what you’re singing out with real life experience, you lose respect. One of the college radio stations has a show where they play underground rap/hip hop bands. They had a panel on one night discussing college party rap like Asher Roth and they just eviscerated the genre because of the disconnect between the origins or rap being a statement of politics “This is life for us” and white kids partying on the weekends. (They were cool with Macklemore. You know he stayed independent a long time and then has retained his politics.) CL might find it inspiring to watch a Spike Lee marathon.

    4 years ago
  51. this is a good enough song,not her best but good enough(dont get me started on the lyrics)I honestly thought while watching the video was GD AND M.I.A.,i just felt like it was a mix of those two and that there was no real individuality and understanding of what they were releasing to the(i love her) public.

    4 years ago
  52. That was just waaaay too much like GD’s style for me.

    4 years ago
    • I think they share this style since they hang out so much together and seem to like lot of same things (hip hop, fashion, rapping..)

      4 years ago
  53. I understand what you’re trying to say Simon!
    I was thinking the same thing, just a smidge differently.
    See, I classify Rap and Hip-Hop as two different genre’s. Think of Rap like wrapping paper. It’s just the surface. Pretty decorative paper. It doesn’t go much deeper than that. Hip-Hop is more like what you’re describing: it represents a culture. It’s deep, meaningful, and comes from the heart and soul. It doesn’t talk about what it doesn’t know, only what it’s been through, experienced.

    This exact same thing is what usually bugs me about the rap I hear in Korean Pop and even Japanese Rap. I know for a fact that it’s not genuine. I still like the music though, I will not deny that it’s catchy. :) And this song is okay. But just that. Okay. I don’t know what I was expecting when I heard she was going to come out with a solo song, but this wasn’t it. I was a bit disappointed. Maybe I was expecting it to be a bit faster. Maybe it’s the dubstep break down I wasn’t feeling. I can’t pinpoint exactly why I didn’t love this song. :/

    (Now, just so you don’t think I’m just some spoiled kid who is just super opinionated on what constitutes as what, I actually lived in the “hood”. We just called it the ghetto. Not fun. Not glamorous. CL would have been robbed if she walked in the ghetto dressed like that. Just saying. ^_^)

    4 years ago
  54. YES. YES, on calling out the cultural appropriation. You are spot on.

    4 years ago
  55. Hmm this gangsta swaq thing isn’t just for me. My problem with CL’s song is that it’s really repetitive and there is no singing parts to balance her rapping. Since she is good singer too it’d be great to have chorus with singing and not rapping.

    I vote for Park Bom since I love her song (although I like You and I’s mv lot more).

    4 years ago
  56. I’m not a big “gangsta” rap fan, so I can’t really comment on that. And having grown up firmly entrenched in suburbia, I can’t speak to “the hood” either. But I am a fan of CL, her confidence really shines through in the MV (just like it does in her live performance). So that is what I really appreciated in this song. The thing I’ve always loved about the ladies of 2NE1 is that they exude confidence in who they are and what they like without apologizing for it. CL continues that attitude here in her favorite mediums of rap and fashion. Not my favorite song, but rock on CL.

    S&M’s comments do answer one question I’ve had about the “gangsta” kpop rappers. It’s an aesthetic, more than actual experience. Which for me is fine, I don’t really care either way. (Please don’t hate me for saying this) But I personally find most “Gangsta” rappers somewhat silly.To me they’re frequently the urban version of the country song trope. Instead of dogs dying, trucks breaking down, and wives leaving, rappers brag about hoes, money, material possessions, and street cred. Since that doesn’t mean anything to me, all I associate with it is “ooh you can rhyme really fast, cool talent, but meh, so can Dr. Seuss.” I have no problem with rhythm, poetry, or rhyming, I just find gangsta overblown and all the same.That being said, I’m not the target audience, so the imagery doesn’t speak to me.

    But I do appreciate the self possessed confidence and swagger that CL has, and it really works for her and this song. I would take a confident rapper over the soft-porn sexy concept any day of the week.

    4 years ago
  57. Guys, guys. Unnie dance is out. SPUDGY DANCE IS IN!
    Now do the Spudgy hey! Now do the Spudgy Hey! :D

    4 years ago
  58. Why’s it only 480p? Huhu I like watching your videos in HD…

    4 years ago
  59. Im old. (ok, not really, but Im in my 30’s) and I am from the US, and Im Urban. (I am from Chicago, and I grew up listening to rap while drinking my juice in the hood… not really the hood, but in my well manicured neighborhood… but I got street cred, ya know… no I dont.. I had to be in at 8.. CRAP!) Any way.. I am a hip hop baby, and yes it has changed. I have always embraced other cultures music, and arts frankly because I just liked it… (want to make something of it???). But here is what drew me to K-pop in the first place… US HIP HOP RIGHT NOW IS TERRIBLE! I hate it and it sucks… it sux so bad that I would actually rather listen to some one in another language because at least then I dont know if they even make sense! I love CL and this video was a cute attempt at… SOMETHING… but it doesnt clearly show what it was… but that is okay too… and they dont have to correctly fit the mold of Hiphop because… then everyone would be in wierd outfits telling you that it was a ROMAN HOLIDAY! (ugghhhhh!) So to sum up what I think about this song… yeah.. Its not that good… but because of my alternatives… its not that bad either… Unnie Out! *does Crane Pose*

    4 years ago
  60. I didn’t like the song or the video (except for the swagness and fashion) the first time I watched it but it grew on me that it stuck in my head however, I still don’t feel the part just before the chorus (where CL acts cute? in the MV). It’s still awkward to listen to. Actually, I think CL rapping alone is better than the whole song with the background music. CL’s rapping has so much attitude and flow, beat(?), better than the background music, which can be one of the reason why the beat’s so slow. Personally, I like listening to upbeat songs most of the time than slow songs and I seldom appreciate slow hardcore rap songs even before I was introduced to k-pop. As an avid k-pop listener, it is kinda disappointing because usually we always expect explosive songs specially from debuting artists but I read other blogs and reviews and they say they liked the. I tried to understand that and I think people that are deeply into hip-hop can appreciate this song immediately than those who are not deeply into it. Not trying to offend Simon, but those I’m talking about are the new generation of gangsta-hip-hop people because I think Simon is part of a different generation those that appreciate hip-hop beyond the boundaries of music. I don’t know if I’m making any sense, ha! I like YG because they balance pop and/or electronic with hip-hop and I think I consider myself part of that new generation, just appreciating the beat, flow and the feeling the song gives regardless of the meaning, deep/serious or plain stupidity, lyrics being second in importance, esp. for k-pop.

    With the MV, *sigh* like I said I liked the swagness and fashion the first time but after watching many times, I now feel sick of the MV because everything was overflowing. Like how you feel after eating too many cheese or oily food. Comparing GD’s One of a Kind (since its what they compare it to), OOAK was catchy and the flow was flawless both the verse and music while the MV, though uses white background (a YG signature), has again flow and coincides with the song perfectly. The tiger, bear etc. “Baddest Female” lacks that flow in its MV. If you think “MichiGo” has random scenes mashed up together, “Baddest Female” is even worse. “MichiGO” is coordinated beyond the chaos but BF is not.

    I think I also know why they use white/plain backgrounds too much. It’s because they spend too much on the clothes and other props that they need to chop down costs for sets and it’s practical to use because it’s versatile. Just change the props and it could be another video. Unfortunately, they use few props so the plainness’s too obvious. Another comment on the video, the gangsta-GD-no-pants scene is boring. Seriously, Teddy and others just stood beside, covering the beautiful cars they used as props. That’s not how people in the hood meet up. Some should be inside the car, moving with the beat, I don’t know just jammin’, not standing, looking kinda bored, while CL and her girls were dancing. They should’ve been cheering for her while they were dancing. It’s hard to explain but that’s what I see in movies.

    About YG seeming hypocrites by looking like they are gangsters while they’re really not. I follow their activities (yes, I am like that) and they really do cool stuff. Attending parties, left and right and many more. I think people at YG are really notorious just holding themselves into doing that stuff because Korean people will kill you if you don’t try to keep your record clean. Sorry, it’s long. Can’t help it. I am really talkative.

    4 years ago
  61. @simonandmartina

    By your definition of Rap, only people who have experienced racism or oppressed make genuine rap music. then None of the songs released post 2000 is real rap . You should listen to CL speaking about the stereotyped asian women syndrome..

    She identifies with the notion of strong and confident asian women who can be badass and she chose the express the awesomeness using Rap as a medium because thats the music she has grown to like..

    And i dont know why you want rap and hiphop to associated with Mafia groups and gangsters… Dont you think thats stereotyping it… Epik high’s raps are about general society ills and they are not gangsters.. but their songs are better than all the bull crap of kpop.

    4 years ago
    • I mean its not about the rap it’s about the imaging and the culture. No need to get into a debate about the evolution of hip hop and what’s socially conscious or pop or whatever! I think the point simon and Martina are making which I agree with, is that CL nor anyone in the YG family is about that life! So portraying it, in this case cultural appropriating these images because they want to be hip is silly and offensive.

      4 years ago
      • oh really…. I am just saying.. if you think rap music is about expression your strong opinions..
        then this works… because CL’s attempt of the song was to get rid of the stereotypes of asian women as mellow and calm..

        Again.. you comeback to stereotyping rap and hiphop music with mobsters and gangsters … my question is WHY??? why should it be something that is a tool to express your opinions of varied topics or about being cool??

        Just because you have identified rap with ganster scene doesnt mean it has to be like that for generations to come..

        what you are saying is like KPOP means cutesy dances and hook songs.. when it is not there is so much more and it has been evolving very fast.. thats what today’s hip hop and rap are its evolving..

        4 years ago
      • THIS!!!

        4 years ago
        • Are you correcting my grammar on an Internet message board? If you are thanks I guess. But also it’s not that serious.

          4 years ago
        • No, I’m agreeing with your post ^^ Grammar on da interwebz? Yeppers, it ain’t that serious XD

          4 years ago
  62. I love EYK and always will… but… I really didn’t like this review. Since so many people voted that means they liked the video or song. Your opinion is fine. There’s lots of videos that I think are terrible but I don’t bash them, I just choose not to watch them again. If you didn’t like the video why didn’t you review something else and mention that you don’t like CL’s video? Just because it didn’t float your boat or tickle your pickle doesn’t mean you need to hate on it. Love you though. I’ll still watch every week.

    4 years ago
    • Reviews cannot only be positive. Then it’s not a review,it’s fandom.

      4 years ago
    • Personally I worked hard to get it voted in because I wanted them to make fun of it. It’s kind of S&M’s thing. This is a “gold mine” not in the quality of the song or video, but because there’s so much to talk about and parody, which I thought they did quite well in the video. Also they instituted the “top three” system specifically so they could choose not to review a video. That they chose to review it at all shows that they thought there was something worthwhile to say about it. And I don’t think you can entirely call their review “hating.” They gave their opinion and backed it up with reasons.

      4 years ago
  63. So many thoughts not nearly enough time. I don’t understand why YG and Teddy and all his kiddos want to live in a Hughes Brothers scene from 1993. I don’t get it. I don’t get the aesthetic appeal of well paid Korean idols pretending to be Bloods for the sake of a tough and trendy image. One that trend past in the days of NWA and two it’s so outlandishly disingenuous it looks racist. Like stop. for real you’re embarassing yourself. And further don’t use references you don’t understand for the sake of cool imagery. Sneakers on a telephone wire is symbolic to a young person murdered because of the brutality of gang violence. It is a real issue in our urban cities and its offensive to see all these kids emulating these references because it seems cool. And further don’t tell me of they don’t know Teddy grew up in the US n Lydia Paek (also in the vid and fellow YG alum) is from California so they most assuredly know they couldn’t put out a video like that in the US and not receive immense criticism for it. And finally Martina wigger was offensive when I was in middle school, ok! come on my girl. I know you have a lot of readers who are of color, can’t speak for all of them but as one I had a cringe moment when you said it. I mean the connotation of the word alone should let you know that may cause some discomfort for your audience. I would hope you would apologize.

    4 years ago
    • THIS. ALL OF THIS. I can’t agree enough. CL’s teaser with YG as a “gang” and CL looking like a total chola just made me uncomfortable. It’s really frustrating how YG is using this image to invoke street cred and “swag”. It’s just… UGH. And I didn’t even know about Teddy selling his merch at the café. That’s just too ironic. YG Fam gets a lot of swag points for their music and their overall charisma, but I believe recently, YG Fam has been taking the fashionista and reputation for being relatively more urban in style way into their heads to the point that it’s 1) ignorant (see “cultural appropriation” above), 2) insincere (i.e. nicer way to say “wanna be”), 3) ridiculous. It’s almost as bad as T-Ara N4 hanging out with Wiz Khalifa and Chris Brown doing backward peace signs whenever they take pictures with them. I think it also applies to how the general YG fashion has been leading towards Lady Gaga level with adidas forever slapped onto their clothing.
      Aside from that “gang scene”, I think there’s a lot of cool points in CL’s MV. I think all of her other outfits definitely screamed, “I’m the baddest female”, and she’s not one to be messed with. I’m not a fan of the song aside from the “unnie ya” and the end, and I honestly think this is better off as a supporting track in her album rather than a title song. There’s so much to parody in this MV alone, and it’s too bad that it’s being put in the backburner for the “gang scene” that is really… too much…

      4 years ago
    • My understanding of the shoes is that it’s an advertisement that someone in the area is selling drugs. I agree it’s something that someone from the US would know has ugly undertones and you make a good point that YG should have known better.

      4 years ago
    • I’ve seen the sneakers on the telephone wire before (several times, actually), but I never knew what it meant. All I’ve seen of it was that movie with Lil Bow Wow (yes, I’m showing my age; don’t judge me!!!) where he grabs the sneakers from the wire and all of of a sudden, he’s a mini Michael Jordan.

      4 years ago
      • There’s a lot lore about the meaning of sneakers on a wire. Other people say it indicates gang activity or drug trafficking. But the bottom line it is a symbolic image of poverty and more specifically improvished urban cities with a high population of black Americans. So by any account CL didn’t understand this reference and her producers directors didn’t care to estimate the weight of the reference they just thought hey it’s what they do in the ghetto COOL! Lets put it in the vid.

        4 years ago
        • Ur right Mexican Americans too

          4 years ago
        • Funny you should say that, I was just about to go ultra ratchet on this dude who was flaming S&M for calling YG out on them not knowing about the symbolic meaning of half this video >_>

          4 years ago
    • Interesting with the shoes. If that’s true and widely known to be true that’s just offensive and insensitive imo to include it and then have a cutesy scene with her playing with her friends and the kids doing jump rope and the clapping games. Martina is from Canada so I dunno if she knows about that. Maybe they can speak about that or something. Shrug. I’m from the US and am born and bred from the south (south east a little bit away from Alabama) and I had no idea that was even a real term until someone below responded.

      With YGE I think they’re doing this to stay relevant in Kpop. You have a lot more groups out there and people doing their thing and a lot of cute stuff and you have some rap out there like MIB and BAP who are doing well. YGE has always had hiphop but now days it’s just too much like this I think. And it’s a copy of MIA anyways.

      4 years ago
  64. The song had to grow on me, and I agree with Martina that the chorus and everything after is fine… but that dub-step feels dated and sticks out in an otherwise fine song.

    If the whole video had kept the asethetic of the beginning scene, I think the debate between expression of hip-hop style vs. hollow mimicing of a culture doesn’t exist because the beginning scenes are just hip-hop fashion. It’s really the last 2 scenes that raise my eyebrow the most. Particularly the sneakers on telephone wires before the hair salon. It shows their lack of understanding of hip-hop culture, unless the underlining story is CL’s hair salon doubles as a crack den.

    But, I can completely believe this was done with the best intensions and CL/YG were just showing there enthusaism for hip-hop. At one point in the video, CL dresses exactly like Lisa “Left-Eye” Lopez from TLC (minus the condom). The do-rag and flanel invoke 90s Snoop Dogg. And O.D.B. the gold, fanged grill. Not exactly the most prominient images in hip-hop now and probably not the biggest rap names in Korea. It lets me believe that this was less a soulless culture steal and more a homage to something CL has true admiration for.
    Glad Music Monday was this video.

    4 years ago
    • I’m curious about the shoes on the wire too cause of what was mentioned with that. There are members of 2ne1 who are into rap like Minzy is a Snoop Dogg fan and likes Jay-Z (if I’m remembering correctly she’s also a big Usher fan). So, it’s not out of line to think that CL could be a fan too. I don’t know if she would know about things though. Teddy might considering he’s from the US, right? Or he lived quite a good bit here? It just always seems to me the only one who knows anything about authentic rap culture is Teddy and Minzy knows about things now days from the music she listen’s to.

      4 years ago
    • I agree, the sneakers on the telephone cable was in really poor taste.

      4 years ago
  65. I have to agree with Martina about the very last part of the song. I can’t hate this song because i DO like the end part.
    having said that.. I prefer MFTBY’s Sweet Dream (both the song and the video). When I go to Itunes I won’t be buying CL’s song, nor will i buy GD’s Michigo. Neither song makes me want to dig in my pocket and spend what little extra cash I do have. Neither song made it into my playlists either. (i WILL be buying Sweet Dream though lol oh yes.. i will own that song!)
    I love GD, I Love CL, I just do not love those songs, and I hope these aren’t a sign of what they will produce in the future or I might cry a little.
    speaking of crying… Simon and Martina, you cracked me up so hard, with this review, that I had tears. I’ve really loved how you’ve balanced everything in the past couple of reviews. they smack of the BAP Power days, maybe even better :D great job. loved it.

    4 years ago
  66. Great video! I disagree that the song was bad though… I also did not really enjoy it at first, but the song really grows on you! Now I listen to it all the time because it is very chill and addicting :) I think CL and YG did a great job with “The Baddest Female.”

    4 years ago
  67. You guys raised an interesting question with the whole “gangsta” thing. Hmm, I’m a bit conflicted about it myself. I agree with some people here that YG may have some kind of appreciation for it, but is it sincere? Probably not.

    When I think about it though, the only two recent videos/songs (that I know of) from them that seem to imitate the “hood” style is this one and GD’s One of a Kind. Everything else I’ve seen released, such as Lee Hi, and GD’s other solos (I didn’t think Crayon or Michigo were “hood” at all, just weird/crazy), don’t give off that feel to me. So I can’t tell if it’s reaaaally becoming a thing for them. I honestly hope that after these solos, they won’t continue with these kinds of videos/sounds though (or at least, not have it as a predominant look).

    4 years ago
  68. Everything is the video is done for aesthetic appeal. The video is definitely not my favorite.

    However, CL has said in the past “I want to break that typical Asian
    female stereotype. There’s this standard where they’re all calm… I want to tell the world that
    there are some badass Asian female girls and that we can be cool. That
    we’re nothing different. I want to break that standard and stand up for
    all the girls.” [interview with Billboard]
    I think the song accomplishes that. Plus I like the song, low bpm and all; so it’s all personal taste.

    I like hearing other opinions though, and your skit was very funny!

    4 years ago
  69. Hip Hop will reflect political, social problems. But more importantly, is to express your own sincere story.YG to Lee SeungHoon (KpopStar ep. 18)

    I love the meaning of the song okay bye.

    4 years ago
  70. Incredible that EYK is screening comments that ~dare~ to criticize Simon and Martina. Interesting, but not surprising.

    4 years ago
    • We are here to make sure comments aren’t unnecessarily hurtful.
      Criticize all you want, just make sure it makes sense and isn’t malicious.

      The comments we delete are those that are over the top.

      4 years ago
      • I think it’s hurtful for someone to tell me, as a Black person not to be offended by the word “nigger”
        But I suppose it takes more insight to realize all the problematic things with that person than to zero in on the easy stuff like cuss words.
        And for the record, my initial comment was not hurtful unless you’re harmed by others pointing out microaggressions.

        4 years ago
        • Honestly this whole thing makes me feel so uncomfortable. Regardless of who says them, there are certain words I can’t stand and that is one of them.
          I haven’t been deleting any comments but some of the mods are getting upset because people are personally attacking them :/

          4 years ago
        • As a am a non American black person, would I be included in this group of marginalized groups who are denied a voice on this site?

          The problem with what you did at first was that you used a word to curse someone. As you know now, that sort of behaviour is not allowed on this forum. Thus you were banned. When you were banned, all your previous posts were deleted. It was not done to ignore your point because as I said, I agreed with it. As well as several other commenters on the site who have been making the same comment in a respectful manner. ( btw, because your comment about not being aware of the commenting rules before posting we are trying to solve that problem. Hopefully that ignorance of the rules will cease to be an issue sometime soon)

          It is not hypocrisy. You simply did not follow the rules of our community. Also, to tell the truth, the topic you are speaking about is one that maybe the other moderator was not familiar with since they are not someone from North America or the environs and may not have understood the cultural implications of your statement. Now, if you wanted to actually have a discussion about the subject in a manner that is respectful to the rest of the commenters then that is fine. As it is right now, all you have been doing is telling us how crappy we mods and EYK are. That does not add to the conversation, but thanks for highlighting where we can improve how we respond to ‘ marginalized’ people.

          Also if you have come to the conclusion that EYK is a place that is not capable of having that sort of discussion, I completely understand. You have to consider the exposure of your audience to these social justice issues. Sometimes we do get some very insightful comments and conversations going but you are still going to run into people who will disagree with you and not get where you are coming from. Just because they disagree with you does not give you the right to curse them.

          That said, I did not like the use of perjorative terms in this video. I don’t like any words like that. I once got very annoyed with a commenter who used a ‘ret***’ to insult a person. They didn’t get why I was making such a big deal over it. As a teacher working with children who have developmental and mental issues, I am very sensitive to those words. However, other people who were raised differently don’t see anything wrong with using those words. Just a few comments up someone said ‘ a word is only offensive if you allow yourself to be offended’ and I almost responded in dissent, but then I realised they were right. A lot of people use those types of words and don’t seem to feel like it is wrong. Maybe I was just raised differently. After all when I was a teen I once referred to a girl as a ‘whore’ in front of my mum and she shut me down on that really quickly. I never called anyone that again.

          You are also right in saying that if someone calls you a perjorative term, you have every right to be insulted and to let them know you are insulted. However, on this forum, the rule is to be respectful. Alas, you can not ‘ blaze them with cuss’ as a few of my friends would do to anyone who insults them.

          4 years ago
        • …the word that your comment was discussing?
          I’m sorry if you think some of our mods are too strict with their moderating, I personally don’t touch anything unless it says “omg jonghyunnnnn” or something of the like.

          These boards were once a really friendly and fun place, I’m sorry you’ve come in at a bad time. We’re doing our best :/

          4 years ago
    • I don’t think you know how commenting works here?
      We do screen comments, but it’s more about the tone than the content.
      If people have something they disagree with, they can feel free to do so, so long as they do it in a respectable manner.

      I’ve only deleted comments from one user on this page, and that was because they were cussing at someone else in their anger.
      Even the Mods criticise S&M on a regular basis, so I’m not sure what exactly you’re referring to, sorry.

      4 years ago
      • Yes, and the initial comment you deleted had no curse words directed at ANY member. How do you care to explain that?

        4 years ago
        • YLZ

          It won’t do any good to ask for an explanation because this will all be deleted…just like the mod’s post where she/he calls another forum poster a douchebag (interestingly enough it was in the replies to the comments you mentioned also being deleted)

          4 years ago
        • Hypocrisy at it’s best. Why doesn’t the mod ban themselves then? lol

          4 years ago
        • Hi there. I am another mod for EYK. Usually we do delete things if they are inflammatory or rude so fuuko was following our commenting guidelines which state:

          Be Respectful
          Do Not Spam
          Stay On Topic
          Mods Are Watching

          I was not online when this incident first happened but I can see all the deleted comments. The person was using inflammatory language and thus their comment was deleted and also it seemed like they may have been purposely trolling. Trolls are dealt with very quickly and thus this person was banned and when they were banned all of their comments were deleted. It was not done just because she was disagreeing but the fact that she was being disrespectful. I honestly agreed with the sentiment of the statement they originally made. As a black person, that word makes me uncomfortable, but I also don’t believe that it is ok for you to curse people on this site.

          On the topic of what happened with fuuko and the other user who is a regular on this site, I would have deleted that comment if it had still been here when I came online as people who don’t know the relationship between fuuko and that user would have assumed that she was being serious ( the user is used to communicating with fuuko in that manner as they are friends). I think she realised that using that type of language with someone on the site even as a joke, was wrong and she deleted it herself.

          We do try to do the right thing though and I do take the criticisms about how we moderate the site seriously. However, our primary goal is to create a safe place for people to express themselves and their opinions respectfully. Are there any other issues with how that situation was handled that you feel I have not dealt with, please let me know.

          Cheers,
          Natz

          4 years ago
        • It’s me again and I’m replying to you because you seem more
          reasonable than the other mod.

          It’s curious that part of your posting mantra is “respect,”
          but clearly only through a superficial lens. Personally, I feel like being
          mocked and silenced by a mod without the opportunity to amend while they engage
          in similar behavior is disrespectful. Furthermore, I feel that having my tone
          be policed by a clear non-Black person is disrespectful. Acting civil is not
          exclusive to using polite language. Otherwise, sarcasm, ignoring someone,
          talking over the experiences of others wouldn’t be so hurtful. I don’t believe my
          tone needs to fit into any cook-cutter view of how to engage in race based discussion
          and to moderate my tone is derailing and insulting.

          Additionally, as a grown person, I don’t find cussing to be
          offensive or inappropriate for online forums, especially when I am experiencing
          for forms microaggression expressed in this thread. Judging by the comments,
          however, it is clear that this page consists of young, sheltered, and/or
          immature users which is reflected in their inability to engage in critical race
          discussions and look outside their own experiences. If I had known this, or if
          your posting policies were clearly articulated upon posting or signing up
          (which they are not) I would have approached the thread differently.

          I’m not a true, but someone who
          was so hurt and offended by Martina’s words that I felt the need to voice it
          here. I suggest in the future mods be more aware of their own privileges and
          how the exercise of their power as mods can also be used as tool to silence the
          valid and very real experiences of marginalized communities.

          4 years ago
        • MG

          I don’t know the details on what happened but I up voted your comment. Because I myself was also extremely upset over Martina’s word use. It took every ounce of self restraint not do a lot of cussing of my own. I figured I’d let you know you weren’t alone in your feeling of anger over this.

          4 years ago
        • I just gave nice long explanations? What more do you people want >_< *exasperated*

          I deleted my convo with Jamie because although it was a big joke (we fight a lot), I figured it wasn't the right time and place, and that people might misunderstand (you just did). Alas.
          Hora: http://www.eatyourkimchi.com/kpop-awards/epik-high-dont-hate-me/#comment-918360897

          I just want this to be a place where people can have fun. Why must you make it so difficult? :S

          4 years ago
        • YLZ

          I’m not trying to make things difficult. I was just making an observation that I felt was relevant to Kop B’s post.

          I get why you deleted it now but calling someone a douchebag right after banning someone for attacking another user in a post was kind of in poor taste. Having to then delete that (because people would misunderstand as you say) when other people are already commenting on things being deleted was bound to be noticed. It didn’t look good. If anything made things more “difficult” i’d say it was your bad timing with the douchebag post.

          That being said, glad to hear it was a bit of an inside joke and not something else…though the person you made the comment to seemed kind of confused by it too. I don’t interact with the both of you enough to really know your dynamic though.

          4 years ago
        • Yea my bad :(

          4 years ago
        • The beginnings of fuuko’s antis. Fujinyos! Lol!

          4 years ago
        • How about ‘fujoshis’? Then you can be part of the club :p

          4 years ago
        • I’ll beg @natz to delete that post

          4 years ago
        • A button that says ‘apply retrospectively’, and deletes all the comments by said user.

          I considered leaving it be, but since you’re a new user, who appeared out of nowhere, and posted 4 negative comments in a row which did not benefit anyone in any way – I didn’t think it was worth keeping. Those people are considered trolls in my books.

          Oh, and btw, since you clearly haven’t learnt your lesson, I’ll be banning you again. Cheers.

          4 years ago
  71. With regards to the “gangsta” scene in the video, to be honest I don’t understand why you guys are bringing that up NOW when YG has been doing it for ages. What’s any different about this? And it’s such a small part of the mv, there are so many other scenes in the video that tell a story AS A WHOLE. In my opinion the scene with her and the guys by the cars was not meant to be “ooh look at me I’m so gangsta.” but rather it was meant to show her as a strong female even when surrounded by men. Each scene in the video showed different aspects of herself that she was embracing with confidence. Hip hop imagery is often about coming from hardship and raising to the top and then showing off what you achieved. I do not think that requires exposure to racism and “hood life” to hold up. All music, including hip hop, is much bigger than that and is meant to be shared in whatever way inspires you as a person. YG artists are obviously inspired by the messages and strong imagery of American hip hop. It seems unfair to me to say that it’s off limits to them because they don’t know what life is like in the hood. CL has probably been exposed to a lot of sexism as a female rapper in Korea. She is often called ugly because she is an idol and she’s expected to be pretty while also being a cool rapper. This video is about her showing how far she came. How she fought through that shit and became queen. She is utilizing that imagery and sound to empower herself with regards to her own struggles. And I know for a fact that not all American hip hop artists that have that image lived “the hood life.” But because they’re black no one questions it. It’s not fair in my eyes that YG artists don’t share that same immunity to judgement because of the color of their skin. That it’s seen instead as mocking something they don’t understand. I don’t see it as mocking hood culture but rather giving tribute to the music that inspired them as they were growing up. And CL did grow up with hip hop music. That’s what she was exposed to. And that’s what probably inspired her when she was young. And saying that she’s allowed to enjoy it and be inspired by it but not reproduce it is trying to take her freedom of expression in my opinion.

    4 years ago
    • Agree with this 00%. I like S&M but I disagree with their interpretations of some aspects of the vid.

      4 years ago
  72. The end of the video was little interesting it’s like they were thinking yeah! Hair is a big part of black culture! So is being stereotypically poor! let’s put a hole in the wall hair salon for the hell of it!(it was quite literally a hole in a wall). It made cringe a little, my boyfriends family has a hair salon that doubles as a auto repair place in the shady part of my town, so I kinda get what they were going for at the end but that’s the only part that I could connect to reality. Gangster culture in general is awful, those who are directly involved usually end up dead. Gang violence itself is really horrible so I feel all “icky” as well when I see videos like this one where they hold up those gang signs and wear bandanas because it’s fashionable for the current trend. Also someone needs to burn that full body bandana suit…thing it keeps on coming back! I hate it as much as Martina hates turtle necks…

    4 years ago
  73. MG

    I’m completely uncomfortable with the word wigger. Hearing that come out of Martina’s mouth made my stomach lurch. I personally have never heard that term used by a black person. When I’ve heard It come out of a white person’s mouth it’s always come across to me as a total disrespect of black culture and it’s people just like the N word.

    4 years ago
    • She’s implying that all the YG stans are wiggers or black wannabes.

      3 years ago
    • Well, I was a bit uncomfortable as well. I know some friends use that word between themselves as a joke and the way they used it here was also as one of those ‘ oh but I really didn’t mean it that way’ jokes but it still made me blink.

      And speaking as someone who has been called the n word before, by family members no less, anything in that vein makes me a bit uncomfortable.

      I definitely thought that some people who have a sensitivity to the other word may have sensitivity to this one, even though it has pretty much usually been used in a joking tone in my experience. Like with Vanilla Ice or Eminem.

      4 years ago
      • MG

        Is it a word that you want used by international fans of K-pop. Idk how much influence S&M have with their young fans but it’s not a word I’m comfortable Martina teaching her fans to use. I think maybe after my initial anger subsided that was my main concern. I wanted to let anyone that read my comments know. number 1 what that word means to some people that use it. and how others might view it. So they would know that it wasn’t just a funny word Martina use to make a silly Joke. It actually could be offensive to some and racially laced.

        4 years ago
    • It mostly fell out of fashion, but in the mid 90s it was dropped a lot. A lot of my black friends used it to describe white kids that would try really hard to act “black.” (which is a ridiculous concept anyways, but I won’t get into that) I haven’t heard it since like 2000 though. Incidentally: it was invented to ‘protect’ black culture. Or at least trying to prevent a falsified image of what it was to be black.

      4 years ago
    • Seconded. It’s just way to close to the n-word to ever be okay in my mind.

      4 years ago
    • I’m from the south (born and bred) and have had friends of all backgrounds and yet I’m unfamiliar with this word? Does it exist?

      4 years ago
      • I’ve heard it used as an insult against white kids who were trying too
        hard to emulate another culture, but I don’t like the use of derogatory
        labels either. It’s funny because I heard both the N and W words used quite often in the south.

        4 years ago
      • I’ve heard that word, but it was used jokingly between friends. I’ve never heard anyone use as an insult, much less a black person. I would never say it, and it was definitely weird to hear Martina say.

        4 years ago
        • Only thing I’ve ever heard with a white person is either “red neck” or “cracker” so I was totally lost lol. My friends and I never played like that so yeah.

          4 years ago
        • It was after 50 Cent came out with the song of the same name. The suburban kids thought the name was cute, and the rest is history >_>

          4 years ago
        • Thank you clearing that up, it’s been so long Y_Y But I’ve heard both words being flung around. I don’t hear them now-a-days, but it was weird to hear Martina say wigger.

          4 years ago
      • It does exist, but to be honest, I haven’t heard it used in YEARS.

        4 years ago
      • MG

        It’s not in any dictionaries it’s an ignorant person’s word. You flip the N with a W to represent a white person trying to be black. But it keeps it’s original meaning about black people. Sorry Martina but you are white and that isn’t a word you should be playing with.

        4 years ago
        • Ah I got ya. I’d just never heard it before. I guess cause my friends and I all lived in the suburbs or something haha.

          4 years ago
  74. Excellent video, guys! This skit was spot-on and hilarious!
    Spudgy’s rap is a close second to Aegyo-illa.
    I guess I should make a Team Simon button. I cheered aloud when he previously claimed that Jeon Won Diary is one of the best tracks of the year, and I also think The Baddest Female is boring as all get-out.

    4 years ago
  75. I personally am going to have to disagree with the whole “cultural appropriation” bullshit. It’s not really anything you guys said, it’s the crap that goes on on tumblr that really makes me hate anything that has the word appropriation in it. I can respect that it is certainly a different (and not necessarily good) way of life compared to the societal norm, but that doesn’t make it off limits. Nothing should be off limits in creativity. Plus, it comes off mostly as pseudo-gangsta. Like pseudo-1950s fashion/rockabilly. That’s what it seems like to me. And personally, I’m all for people mixing in cultures like a big mixing pot as long as they at least understand the basics. I see absolutely nothing wrong with it.

    (The rest of this rant has little to do with what I just said aside from showing why I don’t believe they appropriated anything. So don’t worry, I read what you two lovelies said! ouo )

    Yet I’ve had people tell me to kill myself for wearing dreads because it’s “appropriation of POC culture”. Uh…what? The only thing offensive in that situation is separating people into groups of white and everyone else is a “poc” or “person of color”. And there are multiple cultures that people of darker skin have. AND, dreadlocks are NOT just “poc” culture. I’m from Sweden, 100% Swedish, and my ancestors used to wear dreads and cornrows and shave half of their heads and blahblahblah. Dreads don’t even have any significance in any culture, either. It’s just a hairstyle. Nobody sees me getting my jimmies ruffled when I see people walk around with horned Viking helmets–which they never wore in the first place.

    4 years ago
    • “I’m all for people mixing in cultures”

      Thank youx100000

      4 years ago
    • I agree with you 100%. And in my opinion if one group of people own some style to me it just sets people apart. I mean it makes them and us? Doesn’t that increase rasism? Idk since I don’t live in country that is ethnically rich I don’t just understand most of it. To me someone calling me white is so odd thing.. call me Finn or European but by my skin color? (which is yellowish pink btw).

      4 years ago
    • Remind me when gd have the twin braids in one of a kind. People calling him lil wayne imitator etc. Hell that hairstyle is worn by ancient manchus and still appear in period kdramas and chinese dramas huhh just sayin

      4 years ago
    • *standing ovation*

      4 years ago
  76. I feel like this she is trying to be a cutsie version of M.I.A.

    4 years ago
    • I’ve been watching some of her and saw her at a Jay-Z show (opening or something?) and she did the song and in the audience was those huge flags CL had in her video too….

      4 years ago
    • yeah or ciara(like that mid-drift sweat suit dance)

      4 years ago
    • I had to look her up but omg yes she is just like MIA. MIA does the chain thing and has the same type of music (only more Arabian). Even the tune of the song is a copy. Only thing that seems different is the lyrics and the more hiphop sound instead of Arabian.

      4 years ago
      • Yeah, except for M.I.A. would have more street cred.

        4 years ago
        • New to her so can’t really say haha but I liked her. Going to have to check her out more but yes CL’s song is way too much like it. The tune, the music even some of the dancing.

          4 years ago
        • I’m new to her haha so can’t really say. But MIA is good going to check her out more. It seems that video was posted on Feb 2 so interesting. CL’s song sounds too much like it. Only thing is with MIA it has more Arabian style music and CL has hiphop but everything else…and of course the message is different.

          4 years ago
        • MIA has been around for quite some time. She really became famous after Slumdog Millionaire (she was featured on the soundtrack). But that was just will mainstream viewers.

          4 years ago
        • You’re talking about MIA’s Bad Girls?

          I have to disagree with you. The two songs sound absolutely nothing alike to me. The chain thing shows up A LOT in hip hop, and “chain hits my chest” plus “chain swinging left right” are sufficiently different that its a moot point anyway.
          The dancing was not similar to me either…

          4 years ago
  77. I think with rap you have two types. You have the more commercial type and you have the type that Simon is talking about with talking about social issues. I’m not that into rap but from what I understand with the history of it is it started out as a way for people to let out their frustrations with social issues and be heard. I think with YGE they are going the more commercial route with hiphop. The only person who doesn’t is Psy. In his songs he does talk about political issues of the day. One of my favs from him is an earlier song called “I love Sex” with Cho Pd in which he talks about hypocrisy people have with sex.

    So, I think Psy totally gets it and he doesn’t have to try so hard like the others do. From what I’ve always heard and understand that’s why the underground hiphop in Korea that is there doesn’t like YGE and consider people like Top, Gd (the rappers there) sellouts. Top used to be apart of the underground movement but it wasn’t as long as Zico or Kyung of Block B. If I’m remembering correctly they were apart of the movement longer.

    I don’t know if anyone knows the artist Evia (unless she is going by something else now) but I highly recommend her work. She does hiphop/rap. She spends a lot of time underground cause a lot of her work would get banned (I recommend her song “Oopa can I do it?” to see why).

    I love how the YGE lady remembered you guys. How fun and it would be fun if they saw your video and maybe could get an interview with CL or something haha.

    4 years ago
  78. To be honest I`m waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay more uncomfortable when a company like SM tries to be `gangsta`. It`s just embarrassing. The people of YG might not necessarily grasp the cultural history behind hip hop, but they do seem to have a good grasp of the aesthetic, at least in a modern sense. SM…just doesn`t seem to get it…like…at all? It smacks of a bunch of out of touch executives pointing at a tv screen and going `That! That`s what the kids like these days, right? Let`s do that!` And while the music can be fun or catchy, the blatant bandwagoning can be horribly distracting. I had the same reaction to T-ara N4`s concept.

    4 years ago
  79. ok, i have quite a few comments on this.
    Rap music from that time is pretty much dead Simon. Rappers today are all about their chains and bitches. nothing’s about a genuine struggle, it’s about how hot you are and how cool you look now that you have money. The way I see it, CL is no different from any other artist that embraces a culture and makes it their own. As an african american, i’m at least glad that she and the rest of the YG community are looking at the good guys. The Missy Eliots and Omorions that I loved as a kid went extinct. I can at least get a glimpse of that old happiness and fun and emotion from YG artists. CL chose the thug life, it didn’t choose her- it’s true, but at least she does it justice and doesn’t make Black people look ignorant.

    4 years ago
    • Not true. Top 40 is filled with that kind of rap. If you want to see the rap culture Simon is referring to, you have to go underground and look at people like Macklemore (although he did get recently famous, but his song Otherside is a good example), Immortal Technique, Envy, etc.

      4 years ago
      • but the problem with that is that there’s no way YG would know about them underground artsist are just that, underground. If you google rap in america you get the top 40, always. i highly doubt that they have the time or resources to dig up underground hip hop artists just to study them and copy their flow.

        4 years ago
        • a SOUTH KOREAN music company. They make music for KOREAN PEOPLE. How would they find out all of this information? and who would invest in sending someone to dig up artists in America, a market that they have yet to make a dent in? a company would be smart. I know alot of people in america love kpop, but we’re a long way off from having the Kpop Utopia we dream of.

          4 years ago
  80. I’m a little sad people thinks the meaning of the song is this shallow.. =3=
    GD is wearing shorts with 2 flaps in front of it, muggler collection. But its from the women section.. hahar… so he’s wearing pants at least.

    4 years ago
  81. IM SO TOTALLY WITH SIMON ON THE SONG.

    I’m a big YG fan but not this song. Just no.
    And I hate it when people tells me to listen a few more times in order to like it.
    I like CL, but that doesn’t mean I have to force myself to like her music.
    Sorry guys, not my way of appreciating music.

    4 years ago
  82. Fangurilla: You should review Exo!
    Simon: Which one?
    Fangurilla: Every version!

    I thought Fangurilla was talking about both the Chinese and Korean versions. Hahaha. She actually meant the dance and drama versions. Okay.

    4 years ago
  83. ☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★★☆★☆★☆★☆★

     an overarching narrative of coping and dealing with systematic racism, racial profiling by the police, and economic struggles.”
    True that. The video is about asian women stereotypes that people generally have which are quiet, orderly, passive, and submissive. And BAD girl refers to women who are confident, smart, independent etc that oppose this stereotype thus appear “bad”
    This is not relatable to everybody, but its strongly relatable by CL and independent asian women, even Martina who shared how she’s not taken seriously in business settings in Korea. In the businessman/woman view was Martina being “bad” for not doing what she was expected? By being just a pretty face but instead wanting to join the discussion? Well in CL’s song, Yes she aa baaadd gizibe. Too bad this point is not voiced in the video. I thought it was obvious. But only when I read the trans, if not it was really just captain obvious talking.
    The hood fashion though.. as an asian it has always been just a fashion thing.
    Real asian hood are mangy tshirt and jeans coloured hair and sabre like weapons you know lol!! an off putting uncivilized bunch. Except for hongkong.. its suits there .. and maybe japan too.. (the suit ref. Are strictly from media exposure knowledge only lol)

    4 years ago
  84. One thing left for me…well, I guess for G-D to say….

    “I LOST MY PANTS. RIPIDO FLIP IT SLOW MOTION.”

    He has been taking cues from EXO.

    And actually one last thing….

    yes, CL, where are your baddest females? Because I sure don’t remember getting an invite to be in this MV which is unfair since we know you were referring to me. >:(

    4 years ago
  85. I totally agree with Martina on this one. I don’t really like the song, but the chores definitely isn’t bad and is catchy. Oh and Park Bom FTW!

    4 years ago
  86. Oh man, your report made me laugh so hard!!!!!

    4 years ago
  87. um for the looongest time and still today the west parodies eastern culture. from “breakfast at tiffany’s” to “harold and kumar”. it’s just new, interesting and not completely understood. and yeah, a little icky at parts but as it becomes more familiar, as more people become interested they wiki, they watch, they learn more about the rap culture. i think criticizing yg for adopting a culture that is not exactly theirs, that they don’t fully understand is pretty hypocritical of two people interpreting a foreign culture for another audience. just saying.. didn’t you guys dress up at a princess shop in hanbok? do you understand everything about ancient dress in korea? hehe. i don’t have a problem with what you do. and i really don’t have a problem with yg either. relax, simon, we all know you supa-hood.

    4 years ago
    • But Simon and Martina clearly admit they are no experts whereas YG is highly marketed and accepted with no explanation. At the same time, it’s good to get it out, but rap has such a deep background that it is hard to see it used so superficially with the explanation as to why. People have gold teeth not cause its good…they’re teeth were knocked out,chiped, cant afford health care…that’s one example.

      4 years ago
      • I work for a dentist and gold teeth are very expensive. It actually costs much less to have a natural looking crown made. The only people who get gold front teeth from us are people who are very well off. We actually made a gold crown with a diamond in it for a guy… and it was front and center in his mouth. Some people like it but it takes a “special” kind. It’s totally not my thing but I have to give him props for having the balls to do it.

        4 years ago
        • Interesting. Here’s why I say that. I went to an inner city school and a lot of kids I knew who were really poor from bad neighborhoods would have dental issues and get gold teeth. Why do you think that was? I have no idea then. My dad has gold teeth in the back because when he got them, they were cheaper than regular caps. Is it a status thing? Kinda like, spend all your money on your car to show your not when you are? What do you think?

          4 years ago
      • 1. uh if you can afford gold teeth, you can afford a dentist’s visit. gold teeth are pretty superficial.

        2.i get that there is more meaning behind it but that’s all these 20 something artists are seeing now on our mtv, in our magazines. and everything has a deep background, we’re watching kpop and commenting on it. do you know about slave contracts, do we know how they live, if they live well while we throw money at their companies? i’m not trying to stir up another debate but bring to light that we don’t fully understand the in’s and out’s of the kpop culture enough to stand on a soap box about their interpretation of our culture. it’s a really a strange sort of voyeurism to peek over and say “i don’t like how you see us, change!” especially from a culture like ours that has really not done the asian culture much justice over here.

        4 years ago
        • for your first point, I answered, the dental guy about the gold teeth. That was definitely me based on what I saw an not prices. Classmates with nasty teeth heading to the dentist for gold wholived in BAD neighborhoods. Maybe its a status thing.

          2. And its not BAD you’re stirring up debate. That’s the point of forums. I agree N. America does Asian culture little justic in all points. Chinese food is orange chicken and fortune cookies. Jap food is sushi and all Asians play geniuses or martial arts whizzes. I guess more than anything I personally don’t like seeing something that represents something so deep being used like this.

          4 years ago
  88. I see some points about rap in the US losing its authentic voice of people of color experiencing oppression, but I think that still exists in American music in certain dialogues, and I am troubled by the Korean appropriation of hip hop culture. It was interesting to see Korean Americans on here seeing it as an attempt to emulate Korean Americans–I thought it was an attempt to appropriate black hip hop culture. I think that has been explicit form aspects of YG’s imagery, and its troubling, cultural appropriation is not cute. An identity and its hardships or what it holds dear shouldn’t be used for show. Of course they can do it, but it is hurtful, hurtful to those communities and those communities allies.

    4 years ago
  89. First off: Great KMM! I really liked Simon as the gangsta in search of a ‘hood, the shot of him standing still as other people passed by was really well done. Martina did really well as the news lady, very professional ;)

    As for the whole gangsta look of the video, I agree with the blog, it just comes off as “wannabe” somehow. Sure, you can see the geekiest white guy in the world jamming to some hip hop and rap in his car and well, everyone likes what music they like and that is fine (even if it looks somewhat incongruous) but you wouldn’t see that same guy doing it on stage. It makes me think of Weird Al’s “White and Nerdy” video – he can pull if off because you KNOW it’s a joke (plus he has mad street cred). When I see kpop idols in the gangsta gear, slammin’ out da raps….I don’t know……if they weren’t so serious, I would think it was a joke. Not necessarily because there is no ‘hood in Korea but because the whole message of the song is off. As someone else said, maybe the hard core meaning and feels from the 1990s is gone in rap these days but you still get the sense that either they have first hand knowledge of rap/gangsta culture or they are singing about something in their personal life because if they didn’t, there’s some gangstas going to show it to them up close and personal-like. I also feel like the songs of hiphop/rap comes from a place of genuine struggle, it doesn’t have to be totally serious but the song has to be somehow cathartic for the artist. I really don’t get any of those feelings from C.L. or most kpop idols. It feels like their reading the script and acting. Maybe they sympathize with the lyrics but I don’t feel like they have the personal struggle from the song. Someone else wrote that song for them. Maybe they’re too clean and perfect for gangstas? I feel the struggle from someone like Tiger JK though (is he an idol?), he can rap all he wants as far as I’m concerned, maybe it’s because he really has struggled and you see the catharsis in his face. I feel the struggle of women to be equal too but I would go to the trouble giving it my all unless the songs were about my own personal particular struggles. ……okay back to the clothes. Maybe the gear they’re wearing in the kpop videos is just too perfect, it doesn’t look like it’s ever been worn before and some of it doesn’t look comfy at all. Gangstas tend to dress for comfort (you know, waiting for hours on a corner to do a deal or a hit)?????? I feel like the kpop industry has embraced the gangsta look/rap for two reasons a) to create more diversity in the songs and b) to try to appeal to N.American audiences. I think FAIL on both: a) everyone’s doing it, just throwing in random sequences or so many new groups that only do “rap” and b) it isn’t “real” enough to not look lame when set next to real rappers.

    Proof that you don’t have to be black or American to rap – just rap about what you know/feel: check out the Wordburglar “The Route” or “Drawings with Words” (if you are a comic geek – don’t miss that last one!)

    Cyber_3 – Milk and Cheese! Reid Fleming! Awesome! XD

    4 years ago
  90. I have to say it: this song is BORING. It says like a wannabe female version of GD. And I went to school in a ghetto area…yeah, rap isn’t about an aethetic. It’s about the lyrics and conveying the meaning of the lyrics. Oh yes, GD with no pants…heh. Simon: totally valid point about the rap trends. Loved it! And Wigger…heh.

    4 years ago
  91. so… martina has finally acknowledge that she is the khaleesi. nice.

    4 years ago
  92. Hi!

    About the whole rap culture thing…

    I’m not going to claim to be a part of the thug life or anything, but I have lived in New Jersey and New York for a while, and I have a pretty good grasp of rap culture (even if I don’t really like it to be honest), so here goes my little opinion…

    Rap videos originally depicted the struggle of rappers, racism, oppression ,everything you’ve mentioned, and often the life improvements they gained through their music careers (thus all the bling and nice shiny stuff they pwn being in their videos), but nowadays many American rappers have become just as hypocritical as YG, it’s all about nice clothes, cars, parties and hot chicks. Tons of the most popular rappers (Nicki Minaj to name the obvious) come from middles to high class backgrounds and have normal lives just like most of us, but still act like thugs… so in my opinion YG is just as ridiculous as rap culture has become in the US

    The rappers from back in the day were great, they had such strong messages and great lyrics, but honestly, if you listen to most of todays POPULAR rappers (the lesser known are still great often), they are just as much about imagery and general coolness as YG.

    I think the video was fun otherwise.

    You guys are rad by the way.

    And Martina you’re the first other Martina I ever heard of since I moved to North America! Yay! <3

    4 years ago
    • also jersey/nyc girl. and i agree. for like, the last two decades mainstream rap and hip hop’s been about bling and booty shaking. sexy girls, promiscuity and being wealthy. the majority of what hits mtv is flashy and comical. 2ne1 and BB are in their 20’s, probably see mostly mainstream and are not exposed to the entirety of the culture. do they even know tupac or suge? vaguely maybe. cut them some slack and think of all of the tacky “oriental” knock off junk we’re exposed to in the us. asians depicted poorly in media. the things we have done and are doing to p.o.c. here. then think of a handful of kpop kids trying to be different and stand out, bring something no one else there knows about. think of all the fans googling, reading and finding out more. that’s a good thing. even if it looks tacky, or starts out wrong. sharing our culture in bits makes it better.

      4 years ago
  93. the ganster hood type “aesthetic” they used in the MV didn’t really fit with what the lyrics were saying to me…I don’t know what they could have used instead to really show that CL was singing/rapping about female empowerment and breaking away from the “good girl” mold, but what they used didn’t really work for me. BUT I did like the portion of the mv in which CL and several other women in more hip hop style clothes were doing dance offs(?) and having fun with it, if the whole mv were more like that it would be better. Musically – not my favorite sound to listen to, but decent

    4 years ago
  94. YES! Finally, at long last! EYK Music Store <3 Can we get pins, hats, and phone charms next?

    4 years ago
  95. I understand where you’re coming from when you say, “systematic racism, racial profiling by the police, and economic struggles”, because yes, most rap songs are about that & still are. Although currently, the rap songs that play on the radio or get recognized the most these days are about money, sex, drugs, alcohol, and bad females. So I can clearly see where this song fits, no she’s not from the hood, but she is showing off her money and the fact she’s a “bad female”.

    A lot of people think this isn’t her due to her group 2NE1. Don’t get me wrong, I love 2NE1, she gets to show a different side of her with them. Moreover, pre-debut she was all about rap and hip-hop, and there are videos on YouTube to show it. It’s not so much as who she is, as much as the fact it’s her sound color–if that makes sense? It does in my head… but the fact we don’t know her personally we also don’t know everything that has led her into this genre or what her real personality is. Furthermore, she reminds of a fellow female Asian rapper by the name of Honey Cocaine. Although Honey Cocaine raps about struggles, but mostly about money and how she’s a “bad female”.

    I’d rather prefer an English version of this song, but it’s still great to me. If she has the goal in mind to intercept United States mainstream, I can see that happening for her.

    I feel like I just wrote a short essay.

    4 years ago
  96. I think because they have been living in Korea for 5 years, they have lost cultural experience from living in North America; I don’t mean that disrespectfully either, it’s just a fact. Live in a different country for 5 years, and things that are going on in your home country are distant thoughts if it’s not a serious matter. In the past 5 years, hip hop has taken a shift from being focused on the oppression’s of the rapper, to a cocky attitude that shows through their lyrics. Of course, I’m not saying that the type of music that Simon talked about isn’t being made anymore because of course it is still being made! What I mean is that majority of the popular hip hop songs have been more about having a bad ass attitude about things. For example, Drake-The Motto, Tyga-Faded, Kanye West-Clique and A$AP Rocky- Fuckin Problem. There aren’t any real meanings behind these songs, but their catchy beats and lyrics just get stuck in your head, like CL’s Baddest Female. I can understand how Koreans living in Korea would not be able to understand or relate to the song.

    4 years ago
  97. Really shocked and disappointed that Martina would use the term “wigger.” It is extremely offensive. Do you even know what it means? It’s a White nigger. Would you ever call me a nigger? If not, then how is using wigger OK? ESPECIALLY in the context of this video which claims to be in solidarity with a population that you seem too timid to mention by name. But let me help you. BLACK PEOPLE. Black people who don’t need your half-assed, ignorant, outstandingly privileged commentary on issues that affect and harm us. But, you tried it.

    4 years ago
    • Wigger does not mean white n*****. It means a white person who is trying to pass off as part of the thug life in American Hip Hop Culture. Yes, it’s an offensive term but considering she’s white and she used it on her own husband whom she loves- there is no need to take offense to it.

      4 years ago
      • YLZ

        http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/wigger?s=t
        — nslang , derogatory a white youth who adopts black youth culture by adopting its speech, wearing itsclothes, and listening to its music [C20: from a blend of white + nigger ]

        4 years ago
        • Yes, thanks I know where the word comes from. Still don’t think it has the same connotation as the N word. The N word was originally used by Whites in the most offensive manner. Now some Black people don’t take offense to it, some do as long as it’s done by other Black people. It is also used by some Latinos. However, it’s pretty much a word that should never be used by White people. Wigger is a word that is used by White people on other Whites. Not a very nice word but not on the same level as the N word.

          4 years ago
      • You’re such an appologist. Where do you thing the “igger” comes from? It is clearly a portmanteau word…

        4 years ago
    • I’m fairly certain that she was aware of its meaning and did not mean any offense by it. Like she said in the video, it does actually mean someone who sells wigs and it meant that before it meant anything else. Just like so many other words in the English language that have been influenced by the evolution of culture to have different meanings attached to them. Bad, Wicked, Wigger, Bitches… The list goes on and on. If you’re not offended by the use of the other words that were used in this video, then you shouldn’t be offended by this one.

      4 years ago
      • You’re saying I shouldn’t be offended by the word “nigger”?

        OK. Fuck you.

        4 years ago
        • I understand that you’re upset, but intentionally attacking and swearing at other people on this website is NOT acceptable. And as such, you have been banned until you can learn to discuss things civilly.

          4 years ago
        • In the context of this video, you shouldn’t be so offended by it. And they didn’t use “nigger”. And, wow, that’s the first time someones sworn at me online. Thanks. Or is it swore? Sworn… swore…. hmmmm.

          4 years ago
        • How in the world can this be the first time you’ve been swore at online? Either you aren’t online much or you found the .01% of the internet that is all rainbows and sunshine lol. I get swore at multiple times a week online (well also adding in ppl on PSN).

          4 years ago
        • Psh were you homeschooled? LOL :P
          Def got cussed at in school by ppl too.

          4 years ago
        • Nope, just an extreme introvert who’s about as threatening as a house elf. Which, technically, can be downright dangerous. :)

          4 years ago
        • That’s just cos you’re a douchebag, Jamie :p
          (Edit: and I mean that in the nicest way possible, lol)

          I’ve been all over the internet since its conception, and hardly ever get sworn at. excluding during DotA But as you said, maybe I just hang out in the nice places :p

          Anyway. It’s unacceptable here. So she has all the reason to be surprised.^^b

          4 years ago
        • Hmmmm maybe I always find the .01% that sucks.

          jerk

          Edit: How am I a douchebag?

          4 years ago
        • Hey, what was your favourite website again? akp? :p

          4 years ago
        • But that’s not what you meant.
          Man Urban Dictionary?! That place is harsh.

          C’mon I am not THAT bad…

          Edit: “Though the common douchebag thinks he is accepted by the people around him, most of his peers dislike him. He has an inflated sense of self-worth, compounded by a lack of social grace and self-awareness. He behaves inappropriately in public, yet is completely ignorant to how pathetic he appears to others.” ….

          Edit 2: Not seein ur supposed definition…

          4 years ago
        • Of course you’re not that bad. Insults are insults because they’re making out a person to be worse than they actually are. So yeah, you’re only a little bit douchebaggy :D

          lol why are we even discussing this. Moving on~

          4 years ago
        • Well according to that definition every1 dislikes me even more than I think they do.

          Because you brought it up… You’re “intentionally attacking me” CYBERBULLY!

          (I wasn’t your downvote btw lol.)

          4 years ago
        • Psh no, I nvr said it was my fav site, and it’s new layout isn’t even worth creating a new account 4.

          Mainly it’s on PSN I get cussed out, and in FB groups but I’ve left or been kicked out of most of those that I got cussed out in lol.

          What makes me a douchebag?

          4 years ago
        • Are you 12?

          And please, don’t tell me, a Black person what to be offended by.

          4 years ago
        • Alright, alright, simmer down everyone. Emily H., dinoshawol is right, you shouldn’t presume to tell someone what they should and shouldn’t be offended by.
          Dinoshawol, you’re right, it’s an offensive term. Now calm down because you know perfectly well that Martina did not INTEND to offend. You know perfectly well that if she had believed the term was offensive she wouldn’t have said it. Intent is incredibly important. So, instead of getting bent out of shape, simply and calmly state your opinion. Now she knows. Okay?

          4 years ago
        • You had it right the first time. You were just missing the ‘ on the “someone’s”. And I’m going to guess from the fact that this is the dudes only 2 comments that it’s a troll. On the offchance that they’re not though: That’s not what that means and not where it comes from.

          4 years ago
        • Thanks! Oh, dear, the missing apostrophe. Fixed that.

          4 years ago
        • Oh, and yeah, probably a troll.

          4 years ago
  98. I remember the first time I saw a video clip of G-Dragon that wasn’t a MV. I was expecting a lot more “swag” than I actually saw. He was actually really respectful, kind of bashful, which surprised me. So, the outfits and the way they portray themselves in the MV’s are greatly detached from reality in most of the cases if not all. I think it’s a bit difficult to be that rough around the edges when you’re in a culture where celebrities are expected to be highly polite when you meet them outside a performance. There are so many other things to discuss, but I just wanted to bring that part up.

    4 years ago
  99. Since the topic is rap I’m listening to my buck playlist to set the tone. What I get from rap besides everything you already mentioned is a lot of ballin’ & rollin’ up in the club making it rain like a boss. lol.

    I get the problem you have with the video, but it really doesn’t bother me. And I get that it doesn’t seem to fit, but YG artist aren’t the only ones that give a “non sincere” vibe. But then again that’s not their fault. The fault falls on the people behind them. Anyways, all I know is that I like the song, the video is ok, and I thought the dance was pretty cool.

    So there’s no “hood” in Korea, but there has to be a place were hip hop lives, no? I mean where are all the fans of hip hop artists like Epik High, Drunken Tiger, Dok2, Dynamic Duo, Supreme Team, etc… I guess they’re up in the club. lol.

    Just out of curiosity, what rap/hip hop artists do you listen to?

    4 years ago
  100. The song was a let down for me. I was really excited for it and I know that CL is better than this song. I was very shocked when I heard it. The one thing that puts me off with this MV, is the imitation of a culture without knowing what some of the symbols/things used in some of the scenes really means. I think YG should focus on a Korean Hip-Hop culture image than the American Hip-hop culture. Like Simon said, there is no hood in Korea so YG should tweak their image of hip-hop to fit something Korean that average Koreans can relate to. It would be really weird to see an appropriation of a culture that you only see in movies and whatnot. I am not too sure if I am explaining myself clearly but I hope it’s understandable.

    4 years ago
    • Now if only YG could get this message. I think I like the idea of them focusing on their own culture instead of American culture. :)

      4 years ago
  101. This has been my favourite Music Monday I’ve seen. Not only do you present your (completely justified) unease with a logical argument, I thought the skit itself was brilliant. Sometimes your skits don’t work for me personally, but this one with its pseudo-This American Life vibe and the utterly hilarious (but pointed) premise was a gem!

    Also, I feel like YG gets away with G-Dragon’s appropriation of gangsta culture because he’s so exaggeratedly quirky about *everything* and has so many facets to his image that he can pull it off as an element of his overall er … rebelliousness? Fringe cred? He’s not trying to be “straight hood”– just look at the oddball images in his videos for One of a Kind and Crayon (Neon rows? Making out with barbie? The dinner scene? The entire video for Crayon??) Even though he is an idol, he seems to have more control over his own image and has a sincerity to his work, whereas a lot of kpop groups (to this casual kpop listener) have an utterly pre-fab feel: New and Improved Idols In A Can! Add pretty teenagers and stir!

    I wonder if his success is misleading YG into trying to replicate it with other artists, but since they lack his insane idgaf streak, it’s causing empty, meaningless messes like the video above? I feel like this video would have worked so much better as an anthem for female empowerment and self-reliance, especially considering the ideals of female beauty that dramas present, as opposed to just copying G-Dragon’s copy of rap styling.

    4 years ago
  102. I was thinking the video mirrored many of the North American hip-hop rap videos out. The lyrics are about her boasting of her skill and being the baddest female, right? Similar to Kanye’s Mercy or Chris Brown’s Look at me now, they’re both boastful songs and that’s what this one is. The video also follows similar styling of other boastful rap videos, lots of bling, showy clothes, and “swag” style which YG has been prone to do in its music videos. Yes, it can be considered an imitation but I don’t know if it completely lacks the rap culture since rap culture has evolved from just depictions of hardships and overarching storylines of racism, racial profiling etc. I think lately it encompasses two distinct types the story/narrative you mentioned and the flaunting of what one has become or obtained (there are probably more but these are the two most prominent ones).

    4 years ago
  103. Totally agrees with everything sad here. Not that I don’t like those songs from YG, but it seems too much done for looking cool only. I kind of was expecting this from CL solo debut and I wasn’t wrong. I agree with Martina, the “unnie” part is fun, but only this. She looks gorgeous in the video, but the music is kind of boring because is all the same “rap” attitude of “I’m a bad girl, nobody mess with me, I’m hot, I do whatever I want and blablabla”. I don’t know much about rap, I could say that I’m from the as from the hood as CL (i’m not judging her rap skills, just her “hoodness”), but I totally share the same thoughts with Simon.

    Btw, I got a little disapointed when I read the translated lyrics of this song. I’m a blackjack since the debut and one thing that made me like 2NE1 was that they were girls that I could identify myself. I mean, they were free, not trying to be cute nor sexy, they were girls having fun with music and showing the world that girls can be powerfull just being themselves, being strong and confident, without hiding themselves behind a concept of what people say that woman should be, but now CL is saying all around that the important thing is to be sexy, beautiful, have expensive jewels and teaching that “being fake is a gift”? Bad CL, and not bad meaning good, but bad meaning bad.

    ps; In the end of the MV she is in a slum? Seriously? The slums in Korea, if there are slums in Korea, are all like that? My God, I wish all the slums here in Rio were like that, all of our problems would be done.

    4 years ago
  104. I disagree with you about the culture behind rap music, Simon (specifically in Korea). While it may mean what you say in the west, its a lot less about the racism and oppression in Korea, probably because there’s less of those elements in Korean society (for a korean at least) than there is in more diverse countries. Even in the west, you get a lot of rap that’s about inconsequential things like money, sex, cars and all that. You still see those same themes in some korean songs, but it’s not quite the same as western rap and I would frankly be disappointed if it was. I think CL is really just reflecting who she is and her version of “hood” and to some extent the interpretation of rap to a lot of Kpop fans who really wouldn’t like the harsher stuff anyways. Not my favorite song on the first listen, but it catches on after a while!

    4 years ago
  105. Ok, I like the skits, but seriously, 50% of this entire video was pure skit. I wish you would have talked about the song and video a little more. :(

    4 years ago
  106. I wonder if they realize that when Kpop idols dress and act that (gangster) way that they are glorifying and mimicking drug dealers and murderers. Gang bangers are the scum of the earth. Good rap music can exist outside of that bullshit and many great artists are doing just that.

    4 years ago
  107. I squealed a little bit at Martina the reporters name <3 GoT refrence ftw! Also I liked the addition of So Zee and Simon's gangsta life story. Also really digging the addition of Seungria at the end of the KMM always gets a chuckle out of me. =) Keep up the good work guys!

    4 years ago
  108. Sometimes I feel rap culture has been wrongly appropriated BY RAP
    CULTURE. I grew up in a not so stellar area and I understand rap as this raw, poetic genre with real and unapologetic
    emotions being laid out with word play and rhythm. People like my aunts or cousins who were raised in a more suburban area DON’T get that and even condemn it or act confused when I start playing underground hip hop. Because a lot of
    what’s heard on the radio these days . . . isn’t so emotional. There are still a
    lot of rap artists that rap about their roots or their struggles or
    even the struggle of reconciling their fame and fortune with their poor
    past and then there’s fucking, like, party song rappers that are just
    spouting NONSENSE and pretty much NOTHING ELSE. I think rap and hip hop
    can mean one thing and come from this real place of struggle and poverty
    and racism- and it can also be something else entirely. Just like pop
    music is 90% silly nonsense but then you have real, emotional, adult
    songs like Drake and Rhianna’s Take Care or, like, anything Pink does
    after releasing the obligatory party song from her new album. It came
    from one place but now it’s just a genre and a genre becomes an artistic
    tool to be used however the artist sees fit. So when Korea takes it and runs with it I generally let it happen. YG can push the envelope on what I’m comfortable with, though. I’ve seen the line between bringing the hip hop genre across cultures and appropriating simply BEING a black person. But for the most part, do what you need to do to get money, YG. Honestly, to me, Koreans responding and enjoying and dressing “hip hop” isn’t THAT different from white teenaged boys who live in four bedroom houses rocking out to Kanye like they get it.

    4 years ago
    • You’re right to an extent. The problem with a lot of rap now is it used to be a sort of cautionary tale when it came to the actual “thug life” (Slick Rick’s Children’s Story is a good example). Then suburban kids started faking it and pretending to be hard and people found out they sold more records if they sell their stories as braggadocios instead. Now most people sell it as a glorious life. That’s one of my favorite things about Kendrick Lamar’s music: He tells it like it actually is… terrible…

      4 years ago
      • It’s funny that you mention suburban kids, because I know quite a few who act hard and listen to Lil Wayne (and even a few who listen to Kendrick Lamar; oh the irony XD), but then I know some that understand that where my family comes from is nothing to joke about. It makes for an interesting contrast when they’re interacting…

        4 years ago
        • I had the same problem with my little brother. We used to live in a real bad area of Cali and my older brother and I kept away from that life. (my little brother was too young at the time to even know about it) Then 5 years later he starts listening to 50 cent and acting hood. My just in my room shaking my head, “no kid, you have no idea…”

          4 years ago
        • I would have snatched his little butt up and shown him what happened to 50 cent to give him the right to act like that >_>

          4 years ago
  109. I’m glad that someone else felt the way
    I did watching this video. I wanted to like this song and video SO
    BAD because I really like CL as an artist and I think it’s refreshing
    to see a female idol that can do more than look pretty in a video,
    but I felt like that’s exactly what was going on in this one. I found
    the song lackluster at best and it really seemed like they were
    really trying to sell not an artist, but a pretty girl trying to look
    tough. I don’t really mind that YG has adopted a hip hop image
    because, like all other kinds of music, I don’t think one particular
    race or culture has an exclusive right to it, but this felt so icky
    because there was no attempt to make it an authentic, individual
    version. Not all hip-hop looks the same (despite what anyone tries to
    tell you), but this feels like a caricature of one very specific type
    of rap. Maybe if the song matched the imagery it wouldn’t feel so
    wrong…

    4 years ago
  110. Im a little “mehhh” on the music video. Didn’t really like the whole “hood” part lol. but I watched her performance and it made me love the song a lot more!! the mv was just… a lot of things going on I suppose. But I like the song and performance a lot more.

    4 years ago
  111. Personally I don’t have any problem with the the hip-hop / rap music. I think hip-hop doesn’t necessary need to portray culture. Music is universal and so is rap / hip-hop; it has long become a kind of art expression.
    Well the video for it is kinda alienating to some, including me. I would be weird out if some artist in my country tried to be ‘hood’ and ‘gangster’ like that.

    4 years ago
  112. I will say that we seem to be focusing on the gangster image exclusively when that was only a portion of the video (but definitely the inspiration for the sound). I liked some of the other images that pertained to her as a strong female.

    4 years ago
  113. That news report gave me feels.

    4 years ago
  114. Now I have to preface this with the admission that I love me some 2NE1, and while I like this song, I think it would’ve been mindblowingly better if they’d approached it with a more honesty. To me rap doesn’t belong so much to a certain culture or lifestyle, but instead is its own medium of expression that naturally lends itself to being very raw. “Home” by Tablo? Excuse me while I curl up in my sock drawer and cry. I would’ve looooved if “The Baddest Female” was an honest rap about the very real difficulties women face in a male-dominated society (not specifically picking on Korea here. lots of countries are like this, including my own). I want nitty gritty confessions about how angry sexist jerks that make you, or those moments of self-doubt when you thought you should just quit! Come on! I have a hard time believing it’s easy being a female rapper in any country, so why was that whole journey cut out and only a highly polished, well-choreographed result shown?

    4 years ago
    • YES! i agree with the “difficulties women face in a male dominated society” part!! Especially because CL is “The Baddest Female” it would be nice to not only hear about her own self confidence, etc, but also how amazing it is to be a woman and stand up for yourself and and… uggggghhhh it would have been amazing! I would love to hear it!! ahhh i just had a lot of feels because of your comment!!

      4 years ago
      • Now THAT is a slow hip hop song that I wanna listen to :D CL rocks the stage with a lot of charisma and confident, but it would be so cool if she strips that back a little bit and shows us a little bit of Chaerin Lee; shows us that even though she had a privileged background, that it took blood, sweat, and tears to get to where she is right now. Oh my gosh… I WANT THAT TRACK TO BE ON THE ALBUM!!! Seriously, if YG took the time let his artists develop into actual artists, instead of just borrowing the aesthetic of hip hop and using it as just an aesthetic, they could *actually* shake off most of the haters >_> Which is why I’m so pressed about this song; it’s got no substance. Only blackjacks will like this song, and even the majority of us are torn about it…

        4 years ago
        • AGREED!! I wanna hear songs about struggles, but also about perseverance!! Come on… I’m tired of hearing songs about “I got swag this… I’ve got diamonds that… you ain’t got what I got so be jealous of me.” Come on. I am happy for my fave artists’ successes, but it’s annoying to hear about all the glorious stuff they have. like… tell me… inspire me (all of us, actually) on how you got to where you are! i wanna hear PAIN but also the fact that now, you don’t regret going through that pain because it’s gotten you so far!! ahhhhh~

          4 years ago
        • I def agree. Yes, we get it. You have swag. We know you buy $600 for an item of clothing or jewelry. I so agree. I think with the song CL should have stuck with the image she’s always had of herself as being this strong and independent female and that’s what makes her “bad.”

          4 years ago
        • I know, right? I’m actually really kind of sick of hearing about how much people have. I mean, I’m happy CL made it. I love how she rocks the stage, and 2NE1 just wouldn’t be the same without her, but I know she had a lot to deal with trying to make it in the business. For example, she said a few months ago that YG told her to get plastic surgery. I wanna hear the emotion of how it felt to be told she wasn’t pretty enough but to still have the confidence to push back and say no (because no matter who you are or what you are, that *always* stings bad). Do you know how many boys and girls that would inspire? This biz is obviously about looks and that isn’t changing for a long time, but she still made it. I wanna hear songs like that.

          4 years ago
        • ugh… I knooow!! I wish there was a more emotional album (or track…) that’s a little more personal. I’m not asking to get musically all up in her grill though lol! Just… enough with the images n whatnot. I want to hear songs about loving yourself as a woman and as a human being and how HARD that is to do. There’s always something knocking us back down you know? I want to hear that in music. CL’s music especially as I have been DYING to hear a solo from her for ages…

          4 years ago
        • I kind of agree with you, but CL is Lee Chaerin’s alter ego… I think when YG told her to get plastic surgery, it might have hurt Lee, but perhaps not CL (even though CL wasn’t ‘invented then, I don’t know…)? I imagine CL react something like ‘B*tch, my face is perfect and no one will change it as long as I live!!’ and turn a table and walk away, proud and strong. xD
          No seriously, I think it would be pretty hard to make a song about plastic surgery since pretty much everyone in South Korea does it, even if it’s not a 14 hour surgery everytime. I think 2NE1 should keep singing about being confident and strong, because there are so many girls out there who needs that kind of encouragement, even if it’s only a song… songs can change someone’s life, you know.

          4 years ago
        • Oh, I misunderstood you. Sorry! ^^’
          Yeah, I totally think like you do. :D And try to look forward and not think of what have been in the past… it might be difficult, but trust me, it’s so much better. I might not have been perfect in my past, but I’m almost proud of everything I’ve done so far.
          Hugs!

          4 years ago
  115. I laughed so hard when you went to eat the cake!!! i dont know why i found that part so funny XD lol

    Also, I agree that the song didn’t hit it off with me right away (i felt it was too slow and wanted more of a bang!!) , however the chorus is starting to grow on me! I l did however love CL’s clothing choices! I thought she looked fierce, sexy, and strong!!

    4 years ago
  116. I agree with what Simon and Martina are saying, but I think we have to remember that many performers in the world of Rap and HipHop are fakers. Yes, fakers!! These fakers no matter their country of origin, have nothing of substance to talk about and are simply using the genre (and the foundation laid by those who know what they are talking about) to make money. The only difference I see between those fakers and kpop is that kpop artists are so far removed from the real thing and they probably don’t know that the aesthetic they are portraying is actually a culture with meaning and a message.
    So to me, CL’s “The Baddest Female” is merely following a long tradition and no doing to bad. I kinda like the song.

    P.S.
    “Martina Daenerys Targaryen”
    GOT fans!! You gotta love them!! LOL LOL LOL

    4 years ago
    • I treat all gangsta rap videos where the rapper in question is a fraud (*burns holes in the side of Drake and Lil Wayne’s faces*) as garbage and they definitely get no love from me. Rap as an art form should not be restrict to a selective few who know of its origins, but if you’re gonna use hip hop culture for money, just don’t. That ain’t just against YGe, but to those American fakers too.

      4 years ago
  117. WOW, I took this video from a
    COMPLETELY different perspective from you guys!!! (with Lee Hyori’s “Bad Girls” video
    still in my mind) I felt CL’s debut reflected her style as a badass
    singer. From the abrupt start of the song signaling her upfront style, where
    the clashing scenes of her as a celebrity/ supa queen along with her mustachio
    brohoho look and warrior awesomeness, CL
    showed a feminine, yet strong portrayal of
    herself. The gangsta scenes with pantless GD and other major celebrities
    looked more like a message showing that CL was/ is/ will be just as capable as
    the YG heavyweights beside her. Also, the whole gangster girl image not only
    reinforced a tough look, but also added to the ‘bad meaning good’ concept
    during the hopscotching and jump roping scenes.

    As for the gangster theme in general…well,
    YG portrays it to so much, I pretty much got used to it almost as much as SM’s
    idol trapboxes!

    Speaking of SM, can anyone imagine SNSD
    with those grills!!!???

    4 years ago
  118. I loved the skit! Anyway, I enjoyed parts of the song but the clashing styles, both musically and visually, put me off. Plus, towards the end, that little kid she was holding looked terrified!

    4 years ago
  119. I completly disagree, I absolutely love this song! I bought it on itunes already and it’s on repeat.

    4 years ago
  120. LOL, I just remembered an Indonesian hip-hop song from way back. It’s basically saying all you said in your blog post – pointing out some hiphop-wannabe on TV, who has lots of money, girls, and an expensive imported car. He says how you should be able to rap properly, and have gone through ‘toils and troubles’ in order to be a real hip-hop artist. ….but then at the end of the video, the rapper’s mom tells him to go have a shower xD
    Here it is, Saykoji “So What Gitu Loh”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y0d91nz2YH4

    And about the Korean hood….is anyone going to mention The Movement? Since they’re Korea’s hip hop pioneers?

    You said that you doubt YG’s people have ever gone through the rap culture struggle – but them Movement people definitely have. Back in the states – and heck, even in Korea too – they had to fight a lot of racism and discrimination in order to develop their place in each respective country. Anyway. We all know what Tiger thinks of YG ^^;
    Just a random video with Tasha and Tiger JK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71VRlAFLLFc

    Well, maybe it’s because I’m not American, and I’m not from the ‘hood’, so it’s never been an issue for me whether or not an artist portrays the ‘true hip hop culture’.
    I listen to Indonesian rap, Danish rap, French rap, Korean rap, Japanese rap, and English rap – and by English rap I mean from US, UK, Aus, etc – so for me, ‘rap’ is just a style of music. Back in the day, I didn’t have TV or internet, so I only heard songs on the radio, and relied solely on what they were rapping about. Maybe the videos had them going around in cars with sexy girls and raining money – I have no idea.
    I like rap because
    1. I can actually rap along (I suck at singing)
    2. They talk about stuff that actually matter – not just soppy love songs
    3. It sounds cool!

    I don’t even know what I’m trying to say. I’m not an expert. I’m just an average uni student who likes listening to rap music.
    Like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OkiGO7u-6w
    Or this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=daoRMfRjZig

    4 years ago
    • I also listen to rap in other languages and actually prefer it to English rap. I think you answered you’re own question knowing how Drunken Tiger feels about YG =P

      The type of music The Movement makes is nothing like CL’s song. I don’t think it’s about the genre of music but the message they’re sending. Sing about what you know not about what you want people to think you know. YG is portraying an image that they know little about in this MV. They would not last a day in the Bronx (NY).

      4 years ago
  121. The bloopers slay me. A “member of the Eat Your Kimchi crew got blown away” and Simon “looking for somewhere to shit” XD Simon, it’s called a toilet.

    4 years ago
  122. I vote for CL

    4 years ago
  123. Spudgy should bring out an album. :D

    4 years ago
  124. Spudgy sound bring an album out. I would buy that album :D

    4 years ago
  125. I agree with you…The “Gangsta Style” it’s just awkward for me…
    By the way, there are a new sickness around idol called “bandanadisius” (I don’t know how to say it in english hahah) and some rumors say that EXO is already infected…. XD

    Sorry for my bad english….besos desde Argentina!!!

    4 years ago
  126. I think this could all be summed up in one sentence

    ‘CL girrl I kno you hard, but girrrrrrl u just tryin toooo harrrrrd’. Lol lol lol.

    And I dunno why, but the vid in some areas gave me a Nicki Minaj vibe. Dunno if that’s good or bad though.

    4 years ago
  127. Noooo my comment disappeared the second I logged in :(

    There is a huge problem with the appropriation of “hood” or Black culture considering the anti-black racism that still exists in Korea. It’s in the same vane as a white girl wearing a bindi, where Hindi women who were bindis were often mocked for it (by white people), or the appropriation of Native American culture. Not only is it sort of a big smack in the face to have something that you were once mocked for become “trendy”, but it also trivializes that part of the culture.

    YG has taken imagery and symbols that actually MEANT something important to Black culture and exploited it for its aesthetics. It completely erased the meaning behind those symbols, all for the sake of looking “cool”. It’s something a LOT of people do without realizing it, and it takes a lot for them to realize what’s wrong with it.

    4 years ago
  128. This Musc Monday is for Nasties around the world. Not nasty meaning dirty but nasty meaning good you know? :))

    4 years ago
  129. I don’t really like the song either, but I watched her Comeback stage on Inkigayo and it was pretty epic. She sure knows how to put on a proper show and has a ton of stage presence compared to others in K-pop.

    4 years ago
  130. This issue of (and tell me if I took it wrong) “your life isn’t a constant racial struggle, so you don’t have the right to pretend to be part of a culture (hip-hop) built around that” reminds me of a cool video I saw once about hipsters in PBS’s Idea Channel. The guy talks about a term called “cultural capital”, and how people get angry when someone cherry-picks something out of a culture and starts wearing it while completely ignoring the cultural context. Check it out:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3xe-Wxio1o

    He starts the cultural capital talk at mark 1:50.

    I don’t think that there should be any negative flack for someone imitating a culture that is obviously not theirs. Sure, it’s awkward as hell, but as long as it’s out of appreciation for the culture, then who am I to stomp on their fun?

    Hip hop is a prominent part of Western pop culture. I think that if someone want to imitate/appreciate, say, American culture, then hip hip imitations are bound to come up.

    People are angry because the person is ignoring the cultural context, but why be so serious all the time?

    To spin it another way, let’s talk about Westerners who love Asian pop culture. Is inappropriate to be a non-japanese cosplayer? What if you dress as a Japanese school girl? Would that be offensive to all the real Japanese students working their asses off in their daily struggles to succeed in the tough Japanese economy?

    4 years ago
    • I understand what your saying, that is it really fair to make a statement about what can and can’t be appropriated, and I agree with that. Frankly, I don’t think they’re trying to appropriate black culture in this video at all. I don’t! I think they’re trying to appropriate an image of some Asian-Americans that they may have been exposed to. The Asian “Cholo” is not a completely unusual sight anymore. Mostly I find cultural appropriation amusing, not offensive. I was just struck here by how NAIVE it is. For instance, the scene with everyone in their bandanas. For them it’s fun, it’s dress up. Yet when we see the clothing we immediately associate it with unpleasant images. That kind of dress up can get a person killed. So I think it’s sometimes hard to wrap our brains around it when we see someone who doesn’t associate that look with menace at all.

      4 years ago
    • It’s the fact that they’re imitating parts of hip hop culture and passing them off as something that’s cool. It really looks like they have no idea what half those symbols mean.

      4 years ago
    • I don’t think that it’s the right of anyone other than the oppressed party to have a say as to whether or not something is offensive. There are certain things you really shouldn’t touch, and it gets particularly tricky when there’s tension between the two cultures (anti-black racism in Korea). Additionally, it trivialize what may be a very important part of the culture. It’s not a pre-requisite to have gone through the same things, but it’s more a matter of understanding and sympathy.

      Imitation is NOT appreciation. Imitation can be mocking. It can be ignorant.

      I actually do feel uncomfortable with a lot of non-Asian anime fans–not because they like Anime. You’re free to like whatever you like, so long as it’s not hurting anyone. It’s that the vast majority of them proclaim great appreciation for Japanese culture without actually knowing anything about it. If you are someone who’s actually tried to learn about the culture, understand it comprehensively and actually appreciate it–that’s different. If someone was actually a part of the hip hop culture, not just making the music but having a true appreciation for the symbols and the objects associated with it, then yeah, go ahead and make a video with it.

      But if you’re doing it because it looks cool or matches the image of the song…no. Just don’t.

      4 years ago
      • So you’re saying that if someone is to imitate a culture, that person must seriously be passionate about it. They should have a thorough yearning to be a part of that culture, and do research and learn the language and history of it, etc. Right? 100% all-in, right?

        Can there be no such thing as dabbling into a culture? Would that be so disrespectful as to not be allowed?

        What about when we try new foods, like Indian food, and we want to try eating it like they do in the Indian culture (with just the hand, no utensils). Would that be offensive since we do not speak Hindi or know about Hindu and Muslim religions (and yes, I know there are more religions and languages in India than that, I’m just simplifying for this example) but want to try only this aspect of the culture, and go no further for the moment?

        What about Korean food? Have I no right to cook ddeokbokki in my house and share it with friends at a party because I am not familiar with ALL of the amazing Korean cuisine, and have chosen just to know 2 or 3 recipes and cook them over and over again?

        I understand that other people’s cultures and subcultures must be respected, but can we really not just try parts and keep them if we like it? Must it always be all-in to properly not-offend someone?

        4 years ago
        • Don’t put words in my mouth. I never said you had to be 100% a part of that culture, or have to born into it. There’s a huge difference between appreciation and appropriation, and it’s easy to blur the lines–but there’s still a distinction. Think of appropriation as….almost like bastardization. It’s taking something with MEANING and you’re appropriating it, assimilating it, and then making it TRIVIAL and without meaning.

          It’s obvious that the hip hop culture symbol in this video were there for aesthetics reasons, and also supportive of stereotypes about black hip hop culture. That’s appropriation. That’s taking a culture, however modern it may be, and exploiting it.

          Cuisine and cultural symbols are very, very different, and they’re often considered almost mutually exclusive. Some foods have significance in a culture, but most of the time it’s just part of it. It’s just what people eat. You can eat Korean food without knowing a THING about Korean culture; you just like the taste. You can listen to Korean music without knowing a thing about Korean culture; it’s music, it’s pop culture. But it’s a whole other thing if pop culture and culture mix, and you’re starting to do things that become a sensitive topic for people that take the culture seriously.

          And not to mention that, well it’s just a slap in the face, as I might have mentioned. If I was someone who’s been made fun or or discriminated all my life for something–let’s use something less sensitive..and say that I was constantly made fun of for liking geeky stuff. And now, suddenly, being a “geek” is the cool thing, and all those kids who used to make fun of me for being passionate about something is doing the thing they used to make fun of me for. And that’s not to say that people shouldn’t be allowed to change and whatnot, but what if those people are very unapologetic about it? How would it make me feel to have that kid who used to bully me for liking Doctor Who now proclaiming to be this huge Doctor Who fan?

          Now, multiple the ickiness of that by at least ten times, because culture and heritage can be such a big part of someone’s life and identity. That’s what’s wrong with it. Not “enjoying the culture in parts”, not “appreciating it from the outside”.

          4 years ago
      • ^this

        There is beginning to be an outcry, in fact, from many international Kpop fans about ‘black culture’ representation today in Korea. On the one hand you have those who imitate it, such as in this video, as well as many instances of idols donning blackface and saying openly racist remarks.

        There was recently an open letter being drafted about this actually. http://omonatheydidnt.livejournal.com/11207901.html

        4 years ago
        • WOO!!! As a black international fan of K-Pop, I am 100% behind this :D Thanks for posting ^^

          4 years ago
        • No problem :D it’s been going around tumblr the past week or so, but its hard to signal boost it enough to reach more of the Kpop online community DX Hopefully!

          4 years ago
        • I understand… Many fans are going to ignore it or call *us* the racist ones for pointing out the flaws of their precious oppas and unnies (I kind of giggled when I typed that XD), but if K-Pop really is going to become more than a niche trend, then these agencies are going to have to put on their big boy pants, and put a stop to this.

          4 years ago
      • I love your comment (actually I love the comment above yours too!), and then a question popped into my head when you said “having a true appreciation of the symbols and the objects associated with it, then yeah, go ahead and make a video about it.” — are there any examples of a “true” appreciation for hiphop culture, or any of the Asian cultures mentioned in the comment above yours? I guess I’m curious on, what would convince me that the video I’m watching is an appreciation for a culture as a whole, and not just its cool/swag parts?

        Oh the whole the video *does* come across to me as something showcasing only the cool/swag parts of hiphop culture, which then gives me the message that’s it’s nothing but style with no substance. Which I highly doubt hiphop culture AND CL don’t have.

        4 years ago
  131. Thank you for this awesome review. CL, you’re a cool girl, but gold chains and teeth just don’t go well with hopscotch and swinging with two pig-tails while eating a big cute lollipop.

    4 years ago
  132. You guys are getting more amazing as the time goes :) The skits are HILARIOUS, I am really laugh when Simon eating cake while wearing bandana as a gangsta!!!! . Anyway, thanks for your explanation about rap/hip-hop culture in the video. This is something that always bugging me about kpop nowdays, they always using whatever creative reference from another culture, but just to look cool, without real understanding of the culture itself.

    4 years ago
  133. As for the commentary on this video about cultural appropriation,

    it kind of adds to the ignorance don’t you think (the way they dress)
    It’s just showing these stereotypes about what hiphop is perceived to be and is not really.

    It’s kinda like if I went to Korea and assumed everyone that everyone who wore a black suit with a white button down shirt is a loan shark because that’s what’s portrayed in kdrama.

    I hope the kpop agencies you are able to work and communicate with will take these headings seriously, because it truly can cause problems

    4 years ago
  134. Btw, the other day fuse published a list of the up-and-rising female rappers – including TASHA and CL!! Yay xD

    Women in Hip Hop: 2013’s Rising Female Rappers – List – Fuse
    http://www.fuse.tv/2013/05/female-rappers-rising-mcs-list

    If you’re a hip-hop junkie like me, you should check them all out!! except Brooke Candy please don’t watch that video if you’re under 18

    I suggest watching all of them, and perhaps share your thoughts on how they each portray hip hop culture? ;)

    Lastly…what’s with all the Bad Girl songs lately? Hyori, CL, Bumkey? ^^;
    But anyway, here’s my favourite Bad Girl song/video ever: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2uYs0gJD-LE

    4 years ago
  135. Ignorant assholes be like: “I don’t like it, it’s too american, i thought it would be different”
    Me: Uh…what? YG has always been going after the “american style”, what the hell did u expect from this solo?
    Big Bang debuted as a hip hop group. GD went solo as a rapper, Taeyang went solo as a RNB singer, 2NE1 debuted as a female version OF Big Bang. Park Bom debuted also as a RnB singer, da hell did you guys think CL was going to debut as? You guys really think she’d come out with some Hyuna bubble pop type song or a SNSD Gee type song or a Orange Caramel magic girl type song?

    4 years ago
    • Nobody is saying they don’t like the video because it’s too American, they’re saying they don’t like the video because it’s obvious that CL and YGe have no idea what half the symbols in that video mean.

      4 years ago
      • ppl on youtube are saying that the genre is too american. Plus, maybe they DO know?

        4 years ago
        • If they knew, they wouldn’t be using them as a gimmick -_- The visuals in this video have practically nothing to do with the lyrics; the song is about how badass and independent CL is. The video is nothing but a glorified fashion show >_>

          4 years ago
        • i guess

          4 years ago
      • Well, if you go back through the roots of YG (I mean the old stuff they used to make w/ Jinusean, 1Tym, Perry, etc) then you’d be surprised how much they know about the Hip Hop culture.

        4 years ago
        • I’m not trying to sound overly butthurt here, but this video, no matter how innocent, does not come off as a tribute to hip hop. It looks like they’re using symbols from hip hop culture as a gimmick, because they “look” cool, while totally ignoring what they need. If they know a lot about hip hop culture, then they would have realize how this offensive this video could have looked. I’m not bashing YGe or CL, I just wish they would be careful how they use hip hop culture.

          4 years ago
  136. I didn’t like the video, the beat and chorus were ok. But the hood look was a bit uncomfortable to watch. And did anyone else feel like their hood look was more cholo?

    4 years ago
  137. Probably the best and most honest kpop music monday you guys have ever done.

    Love the skit with Simon

    Good job!

    Spudgy’s remix is hotter than the original

    4 years ago
  138. I also agree with Martina about the chorus, I really like it. But when it comes to putting black culture into their videos, I liked how GD did it with Michigo. He only used dance and hair/clothes styles. Not really anything more about black culture the way CL did. I love CL but this video wasn’t really right for the song.

    4 years ago
  139. I agree with you Simon. There were scenes in CL’s video that I don’t think they really understood. Especially with the shoes on the line, that was TOTALLY inappropriate and could cause major misunderstanding and more battles between Koreans and Black people, seriously! If you don’t know what it means then don’t put it in your video.

    Also the gangsta group scene with the cars and the hair salon scenes. I think that they should not be using those types of scenes in their videos unless they really understand what it means. I am actually kind of annoyed by them all, I don’t like it when real life situations are used as a marketing ploy and it goes for rap videos as well. But the thing is that most of the scenes used are a part of black culture and if you don’t understand it, then you shouldn’t be using it!

    4 years ago
  140. ROFLSHMSFOAIDMT (*≧▽≦)ノシ))

    Hahahaha I haven’t laughed so hard in aaaaaages xD

    Simon’s gangsta skit was PRICELESS!! omg. Lol I was doubling over right from when he was standing there at the corner with this pants rolled up….oh gawd. And eating the cake…

    I love CL so much. I’m actually glad you made fun of the video in such a hilarious way :D
    This is my favouritest review in ages <3

    Danaerys Targaryen? :D

    The bloopers are awesome. Negga ULP negga ULP!! Martina, your laugh is soooo infectious!! xD

    Brb watching it again xD

    4 years ago
  141. It’s really bad when I think that Hyuna has had better solo songs than CL. I love CL, she’s amazing, talented and just someone who is so deserving of a solo. Maybe I expected too much from her, maybe it’s my aversion to rapping/true hip hop music, whatever it might be I am just not feeling this song. I’ve listened to it a few times now and I don’t even remember one part of the song.

    I do hope that CL’s next solo effort has erm better lyrics and is overall a better sound that really encompasses her abilities.

    Thanks S&M for reviewing this video.

    4 years ago
    • Seriously? Hyuna? I could have believed you if you said “GaIn” or someone else tat actually knows how to sing but…Hyuna?? hell no

      4 years ago
  142. I totally agree with what you’re saying, Simon. There really is an American rap culture, and the image American rappers often exude is reflective of where they come from and how they live. It really is more than just music, it’s speaking out about the way they live their lives in a rough environment. That is how they dress and talk, it’s a part of their culture. So, it really does seem awkward that this video sort of mocks that image insincerely. I know it’s not intentional, but still…kinda offensive and awkward.

    4 years ago
  143. In a sense, isn’t YG simply copying what current Mainstream American rappers are doing? They’re making music to sell that is aesthetically pleasing not culturally representative. They’re the company that focuses on the Hip Hop of Korea. I used to be a big YG fan because they’re music wasn’t that far from what I used to hear growing up. It never struck me as odd or strange to see Korean people dressed up in “hiphop attire” and I did realize that it wasn’t an accurate representation of Korean society. However, to call what they’re doing insincere isn’t exactly fair, they are simply following the trends, and making the music that they like.

    Besides they can’t exactly expressive themselves as much as they want, either way because they are idols, not artists even though the idols in YG are given more Artistic reign than other idols. You can’t expect them to be rapping about the social issues or having socitial problems in their videos. If you looked into many of the rappers that come out of YG you’d notice that they aren’t like other idols that simply start rapping because they’re singing isn’t that great. GD is a great rapper and his Heartbreak album showed it. CL is a good rapper too but like her company said this wasn’t meant for anything other than to be enjoyed.

    4 years ago
  144. I come from Detroit, so I’m a bit familiar with the hood and such. To me, when I walk down the street and I see someone dressed like that I’d turn and go the other way. It’s frightening. It’s odd for me to see this as a fashion statement when I associate it with “I’m going to get mugged or carjacked or worse”. I’m not offended or anything, it just seems out of place and insincere.

    4 years ago
  145. I like rap music but I couldn’t care less about the rap culture when deciding if I like a song or not. It’s not that I couldn’t care less about the people that got through those oppressions, just that I don’t consider their story as of any importance when judging the MUSIC, if you have an awesome and touching story, but if I don’t like your songs, rap or not, I just don’t like your songs and that’s it. That being said, I don’t really like CL’s song, apart from the chorus and unnie part, and that for sure isn’t because she doesn’t fit rap culture.

    4 years ago
  146. Do you guys have a lot of Korean friends? It’d be interesting to find out what Koreans living in SK think about the gangster image YG sometimes puts out, if they think about it at all.

    4 years ago
  147. I get what Simon is saying mostly, but I also think that Rap doesn’t just have to be about,”..coping and dealing with systematic racism, racial profiling by the police…” because if I’m correct most people in Korea won’t have any of those problems because it’s basically just Koreans… But Then again there is the whole dark complex in Korea. I just think Rap should be open to more. Tablo for example, he wasn’t always under YG but he is a rapper. His raps aren’t about those things, so I think rap can just be an over arching story of the hardships of life. From any level of wealth, racial background, family life, life experiences. I also like this song. But I can see it’s faults definately.

    4 years ago
    • I totally agree. I like this song and I don’t really have a problem with how CL portrays herself in the vid. I definitely appreciate it every once in a while when someone raps about something other than drugs, money or gangs. Plus it gets seriously annoying when an up and coming american rapper talks about all the money and women they get when they are just starting out; like hello, I know for sure you cannot make it rain. I can understand simon’s perspective on this but I think adopting rap culture is what sets YG apart from other korean entertainment companies. I definitely think guys like Masta Wu, Teddy and Tablo have earned their place as rappers. The video could probably do with a little less of the black bandanas and the button up “cholo” style shirts though.

      4 years ago
    • Simon wasn’t saying that at all; he’s saying that YG is using the images associated with hip hop as a gimmick

      4 years ago
      • I wasn’t saying that Simon was specifically saying that’s only what he meant. But he literally typed it, so I felt that I should just put my opinion out that not all rap has to do with any of the things he mentioned. I’m merely expanding upon his thoughts, not dismissing his opinion.

        4 years ago
  148. Ok, with people saying things about the image, I actually don’t think it is about rap culture at all, at least in the way that it is the main intent of the image. Rap culture is something, like EYK has said, is basically non-exsistant in Sth. Korea and it is something different. When CL is in the video she is not doing anything ‘bad’ but seems to be confident, and I think that is the main point of the image. ‘Not bad meaning bad, but bad meaning good y’know?’ so basically what I think the image of the MV is trying to say is that you can still be good (e.g. being innocent, swings, hopscotch etc.) but you can also be ‘bad’ as in confident. THAT is what I think the message is, not an appropriation of rap culture.

    4 years ago
    • Damnit…what I mean to say is CL is being different by dressing in ‘hood’ clothes and even though she is different she is still ‘bad’ meaning confident in herself

      4 years ago
  149. This song wasn’t very good at all. I don’t mind that CL rapping or anything but for me, the song doesn’t sound individual to her, if that makes sense, and I think that’s what bothers me about it. It has the same construction and flow the GD has in his songs (I thought GD wrote it, apparently it was CL and Teddy but the point is I can’t tell the difference) and I wish she would’ve had a sound that made her stand out on her own, since she is fully capable of such. The dance was kinda cute though.

    4 years ago
  150. Yeah…I agree with Simon…the song was pretty blah, not blah as in barf but blah as in bad you know?

    Anyways the most exciting part for me was GD, Taeyang and Crew. The whole gangsta thing is like a image for them and by image I mean, fashion. Because we all know:

    THEY NOT ABOUT THAT LIFE!

    4 years ago
    • Yb I know for sure wouldn’t be about that life. He’s too awkward for that and I think it’s cause the image he had at first of being the good Christian r&b boy who would skip practice for Bible studies and now he’s cursing on stage and stuff haha. It’s one thing to change and grow as a person but I think Yb is trying too hard.

      4 years ago
  151. For me I got into K-pop because it had less rap or rap in smaller doses because I don’t identify with that kind of image, sound, or lifestyle so much. I understand YG wants to experiment with that kind of image because it is so popular in the US but it makes me sad when they try to imitate it too much. I prefer groups who experiment with sounds and images they can relate to and in turn I can relate to.

    Not at all saying every group should strive to fit my taste either because that would be stupid. I’m just trying to say I found an escape from US based pop Hip-hop music in K-pop and I hope that escape isn’t going to go away due to following trends.

    4 years ago
    • Hmmm….most music in the US isn’t Hip/Hop or Rap. I myself tend to sway away from current “gangsta” rap music in the US because the 2006-present era of that genre is trash to me (but give me some NWA, Snoop Dogg, or Biggy and you will get another opinion :)).

      I disagree about the relatability of K-pop because….it’s pop music on steroids, and mostly manufactured to the group so creative freedom is limited (although this does not mean that the songs are not awesome). Image wise there is nothing relate-able in K-pop to me…but it is hella inspiring and fun (which is what I’m looking for). I also disagree that there is a growing tread of K-HipHop that will dominate…no that probably will never happen.

      Btw if you don’t want to listen to K-HipHop, YG is not your company to be listening to. SM was probably better for your tastes (I listen to more of the SM artists and I’m in love with the choreo they perform).

      4 years ago
      • I do agree with you and what I was trying to say is difficult for me to express. Especially in such a short post as I did XD I haven’t abandoned US music entirely, I just avoid what they play on the radio stations around me (limited choices here between the “hip” station or the countless country or religious stations) some very nice music comes from people who aren’t on the radio (here) 24/7

        The relatability for me stems from growing up with a lot of 90’s pop music. I grew up in dance classes as well so the choreography is something I definitely pay attention to, and I’m also a very visual person, design is my game and I love colors. Don’t get me wrong there are a couple rappish songs I like. Loser by Beck is in my top ten songs of ever. But since i grew up in a rural to semi rural area, a lot of the hip-hop stuff just doesn’t make much sense to me.

        You are correct in that YG really isn’t much my style. I probably should have refrained from commenting in the first place knowing that I probably wasn’t going to like the song, but I do find it interesting how K-pop has these certain sectors that cater to several different tastes in music. I just hope that a whole lotta Hip hop doesn’t spill over to the other sectors too much. Maybe that is more of what I was trying to say I could still be just rambling on. Who knows?

        Thanks very much for your response ! =D I love conversations like this!

        4 years ago
  152. Awesome! I want a Fucking Chanel hat too! =D

    4 years ago
  153. Thank you Captain Obvious xDD

    4 years ago
  154. I’m going to have to agree with Simon on this one. The song really didn’t catch my eye until the 3 minute mark. I do give her props for singing her own single though. Not every Kpop artist can be a big hit if they ever go solo, but she definitely would be someone I would keep listening to.

    4 years ago
  155. I don’t think your conclusions are unfounded, but at the same time I feel there are different kinds of rap. Some are built on hardship, struggle, etc, but plenty are just those “Hey, look at me–I’m so cool!” raps, where the artist goes on about how awesome they are. “The Baddest Female” falls in the latter category for me, which I guess is why this didn’t unsettle me the way it did you (I know you said you weren’t offended or anything but I don’t know what other word to use!). It is weird though to see CL this way when, as you guys mentioned, we all know no one is really “bout that life” in Korea, and overall I just thought this song was ok :| I don’t know, I felt like she was borrowing GD’s image (when he goes hood) instead of expressing her own?

    4 years ago
  156. I like the song but the video kinda threw me off a little. It was a lot going on. Damnit GD put some pants on, man. I can say this although the video was a clusterf**k of glamour, gangsta, and dubstep (eeeww dubstep). The live version of this song is WAAAAY better than the video. I feel as though YG used most of the money for video towards the ads that put out to promote the song. The song is very catchy (YG is good for that ) and CL is a great artist. I look forward to what else she got and hope that everyone will have their pants on for it LOL

    4 years ago
  157. This was a really funny review (I especially loved the Spudgy song :D ) but there were lots of other things I would’ve liked to hear opinions on. Like the way they showed gender and childhood in lots of bits like the random moustache outfit, the part where she’s carrying the little kid, the skipping, the clapping games and the thing that looked like light-up hopscotch. Also there were all the bits where she’s acting tough but also the sickly sweet bit on the swing with the lollipop (childhood again) which makes you wonder what they were really trying to say. This was called the baddest FEMALE so that might have been something to focus on a bit more… Still a great video though and the rap discussion was interesting even if I don’t really have a strong opinion. I guess I just think that music has to be able to evolve.

    4 years ago
  158. Hey guise!! When you brought up the gangsta culture point, it really made me think about it. Even though I’m not about that life, I really agree with you guys. I think dressing like that has a LOT more significance in North America than in Korea.
    Actually, one day at school I wore a blue bandana in my hair like Martina wears her bandana. One of my friends asked if I was reppin the crips… and he then warned me not to wear it off campus or people might get the wrong idea.
    So yeah! Great review guys!!

    4 years ago
  159. I don’t understand why kpop fans are always complaining about American music. American or western style music isn’t just about pop or hip hop. There are so many genres outside of mainstream music that are very good. I also think that American Hip-hop music doesn’t really represent the “struggle” either. Many American rappers just put on the “hip hop look”, kind like what YG does. They generally don’t talk about important issues and if they do they are not as popular. So, I don’t really see anything wrong with YG using this image. In my opinion it’s kind of refreshing to see something new in kpop. Anyway, thanks for doing a review. It’s always interesting to her what you guys have to say. I love your videos!

    4 years ago
  160. That was my SPUDGY drawing :D

    4 years ago
  161. Yeah, it feels fake. Really? You’re “bad” eh? Not so convinced. Contrast that to Gangnam Style, which pokes fun at a something authentic to Korea. Instead of western gansta style (based on a real culture), if these K Pop stars want to be “bad” Korean style, they might play on the stereotypical idea of what a Korean gangster looks like (i.e. something more akin to the Japanese Yakuza).

    4 years ago
  162. Wait!! Did the rate the english?

    4 years ago
  163. I like this song :) Yes it reminds me of GD’s songs but i like GD so it’s okay ^^ I do admit that there are somethings in the MV that kinda puzzle me…like why the heck was she in a jungle?! But, CL is one of my favorite girl K-pop singers, I like her sound a lot :) But on a side note: ohhhh god who took GD’s pants??! And Simon…YOU SO GANGSTA ! I wonder how many people thought you were a real gangsta and how many weird stares you got lol :P
    ….I have to say that I may like Spudgy’s version of the song alittlllle bit better ;D (I think it’s because i’m Spudgy biased ;P)
    I think CL’s solo act is better on this one..

    4 years ago
  164. I’m glad you talked about the appropriation of rap culture! I was hoping you wouldn’t ignore it. This is the biggest problem I have with this song and with most of the music YG has been releasing lately.

    4 years ago
  165. So…I don’t really like this song. I’m kind of waiting for it to grow on me, like crayon and one of a kind did (I didn’t like those right away either) I agree with Simon that being “gangsta” without actually being from the “hood” is probably an insult to those actually from the hood. But, I think rapping and hip hop has become synonymous with gangsta style. Imagine if you’d have a rapper dressed like (fill in the blank…I don’t want to get murdered) people might not take them seriously. It’s almost like being a rapper has it’s own dress code

    4 years ago
  166. I thought both solo acts were terrible. I honestly can’t pick which one was worse :P Which is so strange, because I love 2ne1

    4 years ago
  167. Did Soo Zee dye her hair?
    or is it just me.

    4 years ago
    • Would you believe that totally distracted me from Simon? I squee’d and said, “Soo Zee’s blonde! Eeeee!” <3

      4 years ago
    • Yes, she dyed it ash blonde. You noticed the cameo too? ^_^

      4 years ago
  168. I don’t see how western rap music (at least modern, mainstream rap) is any less fake then what we are seeing from YG right now. For starters, not all Western rappers actually grew up in that kind of culture. For them, it’s all an image. And even for the ones who did grow up that way, it’s still mostly an image being sold to us. They aren’t being truly genuine about where they’ve come from. They’re using the image to get your money. And boost their ego. On top of that, none of them, None of them, are actually dealing with a lot of the problems they rap about anymore. They’re celebrities now, making millions of dollars a year and going to fancy parties and driving expensive cars. They’ve left a large chunk of that ‘thug’ life behind. It’s why I dislike a lot of mainstream rap music. Because it’s so disengenuine. Personally, I really like YG’s take on the thug, gangsta’, rapper image. Yes, they’re using it partly as a fashion, but that doesn’t invalidate the fact that they are inspired by rap music and want to emulate it in their own way. I see it more as symbolic. They’re not saying, ‘Look at us. Look at how gangsta’ we are.’ They’re saying, ‘Look at us. We go hard when it comes to our music.’

    But that’s just my personal opinion on the matter.

    4 years ago
    • I feel the same about mainstream US hip hop than about this video: fake, focused on money and hyper-sexualized girls… Both are very far from the origins of the genre.

      4 years ago
      • But that’s kind of natural, isn’t it? Music evolves and changes. A genre of music won’t stay the same forever.

        4 years ago
        • It’s not even about music, it’s about image… And for me, it didn’t naturally evolved, it was clearly hijacked for money. That’s the way I feel about it.

          4 years ago
        • I figure it’s their way to stay relevant in Kpop. SME has their thing going on and JYPE and you have rookie groups like BAP and MIB and Vixx who are rising in their popularity. Kpop is crazy with all the people there so they have to have a way to stay relevant and unique and YGE has always had hiphop with it. Just compare old stuff with new stuff though. I liked the old stuff better cause, to me, it seems like they weren’t trying so hard to be relevant or something.

          4 years ago
  169. I respect your opinion and I don’t exactly agree with everything you said, but I feel as though you guys focused more on the “gangsta” side of YG rather than the actual video or CL for that matter. =/

    4 years ago
  170. i like the MV i really do its just another concept idek but the song isnt that great itself

    4 years ago
  171. Just wanted to say ; the title of the song is “The baddest female” not “The baddest gangster”. WE OUT

    4 years ago
  172. I felt the same way when I saw Eunhyuk wearing a “Hip-Hop Saved My Life” t-shirt in the MV for I Wanna Dance. I was like, really Hyuk? Lol. I’m sure his rapping is the only thing that got him off the streets :P

    4 years ago
  173. I think, from my observations, that in Korea hip-hop is more of a music genre, not culture. I love YG’s music, but when it comes to creating the “bad boy” image they always fall short because they don’t have the “hood” characteristics that go along with rap artist like Simon mentioned before… i grew up watching/listening American rap artist like 2pac, 50 cent, snoop dog, A Tribe Called Quest, LL Cool J, Dr.Dre ect, so when I see GD all dressed up in hip-hop attire it seems more like a costume rather than his identity. Do korean’s see Korean hip-hop artists this way or do they have a different view?

    4 years ago
  174. LOL I haven’t even finished watching the video, but OMG THIS MIGHT BE ONE OF MY FAVORITE KMMS EVAAAH! The whole news segment and explaining what you mean by “wicked”…. EPIC! I wasn’t exactly looking forward to this KMM, cuz I wasn’t particuarly fond of CLs song… meh! And the video for me was also kinda boring… I thought to myself, what is there to talk about except for “bad meaning good”. But you proved me wrong.

    4 years ago
  175. I am kind of surprised by how offended people are getting over this song. Maybe just because I live in Montana and we don’t really have hoods here either? I didn’t really feel like the video was especially set in Korea either as much as a less developed Southeast Asian country were CL would have a huge fan base that maybe deals with issues similar to those of “authentic” American rappers. I don’t know if that justifies anything though.

    4 years ago
  176. I never realized how beautiful CL is, this video really shows her natural beauty

    4 years ago
  177. Totally agree with you guys ,because i loved YG artist but this video it´s just sooo boring and common

    4 years ago
  178. Game of Thrones FTW! Did you guys see The Red Wedding episode? The Starks are an endangered species.

    4 years ago
  179. I think my biggest problem with the song is that it sounds a lot like GD. I wish they would’ve given CL her own distinctive style instead of rehashing GD’s style for a girl. YG usually does an amazing job with solos in making them have their own flavour and suiting the artist really well, but this time they shafted CL. She could do a lot better

    4 years ago
    • I seriously had GD deja vu and then promptly put the song out of my mind. It’s not that I don’t love GD or CL, but I couldn’t be bothered with two such similar sounds.

      4 years ago
  180. Normally I’d say that both CL and GD has this extraordinary fashion superpower of making ANYTHING look good, however ridiculous it really is. (Remember CL straight-jacket for instance.)

    But this no pants look of GD in this video I can only take as a result of some kind of bet or dare between them going horribly wrong…

    4 years ago
    • Sometimes I think GD just does crazy shit to see who if anyone will say something about it… like the Emperor With No Clothes only he knows damn well he’s stark naked and is looking for someone to go. A-Yo GD enough man enough.

      4 years ago
  181. Here are my feelings about YG and Hip Hop. On one hand I feel like Hip Hop has moved beyond the underground dirty drug dealer hard knock life form of expressionism and has branched off into a bunch of other fields. There’s the Party Rap, Rich IDGAF Rap, Geeky/Comedy Rap, Philosophical (Epik High Style) Rap, in addition Classic Hip Hop style (it’s still around) and that’s just what I know of in the States and I’m not even into Hip Hop. I feel like it’s grown from a Ghetto/Fight The Power exclusive club and opened up to so many more people.

    However a part of that evolution also involved clothing and I feel like while YG is ok with the changing times of Hip Hop some of his clothing choices are obviously dated. YGE in particular has a group of Hip Hoppers who I see embody the bandana clothing style rap in the most awkward of ways. I can just hear YG in the background going yeah this looks like the Hip Hop that I know and love… but Sorry To Say Mr. YG that style just doesn’t fit your artists. They aren’t Wu-Tang and they shouldn’t aspire to be them. If they explored their own version of Hip Hop clothing (because I’ve seen CL and GD both pull off some amazing looks). Hell everyone else has moved past that outdated style it’s time to let it go YG.

    4 years ago
  182. *This* is what won Music Monday, not EXO’s Wolf, which channels Cats the Musical and has a cute guy making a claw movement (EXO-K)? Dayyum…

    4 years ago
    • I’d rather they review the drama version if they have to review that song… there is more one can get out of a drama version of a song…

      4 years ago
    • They are waiting for the Drama Version to come out… let’s hope it’s not like B2st’s and takes less than a year to release.

      4 years ago
  183. This MM was so clever! Great job guise! I see your points on the imagery of the video….although the song itself has grown on me … I’ve yet to buy it off iTunes…so that’s a big sign it wasn’t all that. I love CL and 2ne1 but this just wasn’t her strongest work.

    4 years ago
  184. First off, I have to commend you guys for this. I know that this is a hard subject to really talk about, seeing as to how you guys haven’t had first hand experience of that this video is using as a gimmick. Because that’s what YG is doing; using black culture as a gimmick. I love YG. I love BIGBANG and 2NE1 and Lee Hi and I sure as hell know that I’m gonna Akdong Musician’s number 1 stan when YG learns how to manage more than one idol group at a time (YEAH, I SAID IT!!!). So don’t get it twisted, YG superfans; I’m not Anti-Kpop Fangirl. I’m nowhere close. *ahem* YG, please stop this. I know you guys are trying to look cool and show off your fascination of black culture, but this is not the way to do it. Personally, I’m not offended by this, because my parents shielded me from this lifestyle enough so that I won’t be *that* attached to it, but people that full sale throw themselves in that life (or have come from that life) are going to think that this is a sick joke or that Koreans are racist (because pop culture is supposed to be representation of what’s current in a country, if I’m not mistaken, so yes, there will be generalizations) or something way worst. Once again, I’ve going to reiterate that I love YG. When I listen to early BIGBANG, se7en, Gummy, Taeyang, et all, I hear the soul that these guys poured into their music. And I hope Papa YG and his artists can recapture that, because there’s no other way they’re making it anywhere but Seoul City if they don’t.

    4 years ago
    • I agree. I don’t mind YG or their artists taking a liking to what modern day hip hop has become or even the image of what they think the hood is (which really makes me see how naive they are), but it’s when they use certain images associated with the “hood life” withiut knowing what they mean that really bothers me. The scene where CL sits with her crew on the front steps and there are shoes dangling from a wire shocked me. I’m assuming the reason the put this scene in was purely for aesthetic purposes. But it’s this reason that bothers me. I grew up in the inner city. I didn’t live in the “hood” where everything went down, but in the surrounding areas next to the hood, which still warranted the need for a cop to patrol the area every night. I learned at a young age to avoid areas with shoes hanging on a power line. It bothers me thattthey’ve taken this and essentially commercialize and glorify it without knowing what it stands for.

      I know YG has people from the US, so it really puzzles me at how certain scenes made it into the mv. But then again, from my knowledge, most of the YG crew from the US lived in well to do families so I don’t think they would have known what the images represented…

      4 years ago
      • That’s what gets me. People say that YGe has to know what the symbols mean, because they have Korean-American employees (writers, producers, et al), but it’s incredibly obvious that they don’t know, or else they would have told Papa YG what’s up. Practically everyone who does know what’s up is pretty uncomfortable with how the shoes on the wire is being glamourized in this video.

        4 years ago
        • so this makes me wonder where the hell was perry at or even jinu to whoop their ass and say that this shit ain’t gonna cut it cuz it ain’t cool. lol. hell even tablo could have told them something? he seems like a guy who’s aware of things. he’s smart as hell. but maybe they weren’t around to look over it or something? but still, for teddy to not know about it seems a little off. he learned from perry after all. maybe they thought people would be okay with it? maybe they were underestimating the awareness of their international fans? maybe we’re ALL just making a mountain out of a molehill from this. lmao.

          4 years ago
        • Perhaps we are making a mountain out a molehill, but if someone doesn’t say something, then nothing is going to change. There are a lot of international fans (and even some Korean fans) that didn’t think this video was cool. If this was a matter of opinion, then I’d leave it alone because it’s not *that* big a deal that one of my favorite releases ONE song out of many that I don’t like, but it isn’t opinion.

          4 years ago
        • what do you mean it isn’t opinion? it’s totally based on opinion. that shoe-over-wire scene, yes. that seems to be a big no-no for most here. (tho nobody on YG’s camp thought it was offensive so it could still be a matter of opinion. or is that ignorance? hm.) but the supposed cultural appropriation vs appreciation general issue that this mv brings up is a matter of opinion. no?? this is a very subjective issue we’re all concerned with here. it doesn’t have a clear black and white. grey areas exist. i’m pretty neutral about this, but reading through the comments section for hours, both sides seem to bring up substantial points on why it can or can’t be cultural appropriation. so, how is it not based on opinion? unless you’re specifically talking about that one shoe-over-wire scene, then yeah i suppose it’s not a matter of opinion.

          but y’know, i googled shoe-over-wire, (shoe tossing? shoefiti?) it has some other meanings too. like, when a man’s leaving the military, they paint their boots and toss em over the wire, or supposedly in scotland it means someone lost their virginity lmao. but in CL’s context we know which meaning it’s associated with i guess. haha. anyway, i’m not arguing with you. as long as everyone’s having a civil, peaceful debate then i really couldn’t care less. peace!!

          4 years ago
        • I’m talking about the shoe over the wire part; out of the context of the video, it could have several meanings, but in context, the possible meanings have been narrowed down. A lot XD All the appropriation vs. appreciation debate is very subjective; I am on the side of appropriation, but the appreciation has brought up some good arguments like you said.

          4 years ago
        • … I really am amused by that Scottish meaning.

          I also agree wholeheartedly with your last statement.

          4 years ago
        • haha. when i read that, i went into a fit of giggles. keke.

          4 years ago
    • Well said, man. I love YG too, but when I see stuff like this I can’t help but get a little worried about them thinking more about what’s “hip” and what will bring in the moolah, as opposed to really trying and being sincere. D: I’m not losing total faith in them just yet, but yeah…I hope they’ll be careful.

      4 years ago
      • Thank you :D I’m feeling real careful about YG as well. Idk if I made a clear in my comment how much I love YG’s music, because I do. They brought the fire with Lee Hi’s comeback and I was sure they were going to with this release too. It just sucks, because I can see how this release could have been so much better if they spent a little bit more time on it. I just think Papa YG needs to really think about what direction he wants to take his company, because this current one is not cutting it.

        4 years ago
        • Ha ha, yeah, I totally get you. I know they have it in them to make amazing things, so I just reaaally hope they don’t lose sight of what made their artists so good in the first place.

          4 years ago
    • I already said this, but FINALLY someone that thinks exactly like me! xD

      4 years ago
  185. I definitely get what you mean by the culture of rap music (huge 2pac fan writing here), but at the same time, I think your/our definition of rap culture is more of a 90’s thing (I mean, compare 2pac/Biggie/etc. to any of the post-2005 rappers nowadays). I feel like that kind of culture/depth in hip-hop and rap has pretty much died in contemporary music (with the exception of epik high). So, I don’t think I can say that CL or YG in particular used inappropriately/ignored/commercialized rap culture when the rest of the world and mainstream music have already been doing it.

    However, I do see your point about YG re-shaping hip hop culture in a very not-true-to-Korean-culture way. I feel like with YG MV’s, like “Bad Boy” and even this song…*sigh* I don’t know…they just look like wannabe Korean American gangsters, and it’s silly because they are definitely not in any way American, and gangster culture is so different in Korea than in the States. In Korea, stereotypical gangster culture is either blatant jopok life where you go around beating the crap out of people, wearing black suits, shaving your head, and shanking ppl with sashimi knives OR you’re some gum-snapping bully in the school courtyard. You are not like Big Bang in Bad Boy or CL in this MV. Also, whereas in America, gangster culture is often very closely tied to music, especially hip hop, that kind of connection doesn’t exist at all in korea.

    However, since they are artists and have the license to make creative use of different cultures outside of Korea, I can’t say too much about it. All I can say is that, as a Korean American, I really get annoyed when kpop idols who don’t know anything about Korean American culture – including its gang culture – try to look all hip-hoppy and attempt to look cool by throwing around gang paraphernalia they have no idea about. It just feels so…기분 나빠….because it looks like they’re trying to be some Korean-ized, “cool” person who’s using American culture as an aesthetic and it’s just insulting to me because I’m Korean American. It’s almost like they’re trying to make their own weird Korean American identity without any knowledge of real Korean American culture by using American cultural icons/music in Korean-ized ways to make themselves look different/stand out… Idk…does that make sense? They basically look like wannabe Korean Americans, which to me, is annoying because I’m…well…an actual Korean American from the ghetto. And they’re definitely not.

    But actually, I found the song itself to be pretty catchy. Plus CL is gorgeous. I’ve liked all of 2ne1’s stuff (except that Dell commercial song), so I’m gonna say that I like the song but yeah…the video and the image portrayals…not that cool man.

    4 years ago
    • Check out “Quiet Time” by Archive if you want some good modern rap.

      3 years ago
    • half Korean and half Chinese American here! Who also happens to be a hip-hop fan also ^^ You put a well-thought comment here ^^ I do agree with everything you said here. To be honest, YG hasn’t done any really good hip-hop tracks/concepts since 1TYM and old Big Bang’s songs. With the exception of Epik High and some of G-Dragon’s songs (though “One of a Kind” is something that Lil Wayne could do… o.O), I feel like YG is pushing too hard on trying to be “gangsta”. I think they should at least learn about the American hip-hop culture (from the 90’s to 2006) before putting out videos like this (hey, not all hip-hop videos are about wearing huge amounts of bling, going to parties, getting drunk, getting girls- AYYYYY GURLLL. CAN I BUY YOU A DRINK- and acting cool, right?). I liked the video and how it was edited, but scenes like everyone’s wearing bandanas, hanging around with your “Crew” and “Do The Unnie” were kind of awkward….

      4 years ago
      • thx! omg…yeah…one of a kind. i really liked heartbreaker and stuff but i really had to put my foot down on one of a kind. i mean, yg is by far my favorite company (their music is so good!) and i love yg fashion, but it’s starting to get a bit ridiculous. but yg does like to stir up controversy so…meh haha other than this wannabe awkwardness, i felt uncomfortable with all the girl hitting and suicidal thoughts in go away and the rape stuff in lies…hmm…yg…stop making me feel uncomfortable haha

        4 years ago
        • lol It’s not the YG-like-to-stir-up-controversy thing (I would say more like being more edgy than stir up controversy in my opinion) but its understanding the concept of hip-hop in general is the problem.

          4 years ago
    • Gotta be honest, I definitely don’t think that Big Bang looked “hood” in Bad Boy at all. I mean, the closest to the look was GD, but him not even that much, except for his hat, I think (and the other members were pretty much all wearing non-gangster clothes). Was it because they decided to film it in New York, too? Because I think that was fine as well. Just my opinion on that. :) But yeah, in CL’s vid, I can understand what you mean by the more “wannabe” side, though.

      4 years ago
      • aww maybe it was just me then. i had to mention bad boy tho cuz when I saw the mv, the way it was shot in a concrete jungle and the fences, graffiti, trash/litter in a lot of places, empty lot thingies, broken pay phone, subway, random people in shop nooks, all those shops that don’t exactly belong in beverley hills, and especially that pimp car-looking car gd comes out of…it just looked like they were trying to be ghettoooo lol also the whole black and white thing at the beginning reminded me of a lot of r&b hood-ish mv’s from way back when. plus it reminded me a of ghetto parts of k town in la or ghettoes in oakland.

        4 years ago
        • __

          To be frank, I have a feeling you’ve never actually been to any of the boroughs. That’s just the way the city looks. (Born and raised NY’er here.)

          There was nothing blatant in the “Bad Boy” M/V that was about being ‘ghetto’ and it’s kind of more obnoxious to me that you just assume the way NY looks is ‘ghetto’ because of that video when there was nothing ghetto about it. That’s just NY. There’s construction going on, and that’s how our subways and fences look, and yes, there are graffiti all over doors and the metal lock down things on stores, and people waiting in little nooks at all hours of the day.

          The restaurants and stores in the video are not anything that would be in Beverly Hills because it’s not Beverly Hills, but they definitely aren’t “ghetto” either just because it isn’t Beverly Hills-esque. That’s how the average store in NY looks. Not even being in the rich area of Manhattan would you ever see something look like anything in Beverly Hills. Completely different tastes and lifestyles.

          4 years ago
    • hmm…after reading all the comments here, re-reading my post, and thinking about it some more…i’m starting to think that the reason they’re using an americanized and, well…fake…ghetto/gangster look is because, although they want to look tough and gangster, if they did it the authentic Korean way i.e. portrayed themselves as jopok members or “gum-snappers,” YG would never be able to get away with it. Korea is still really conservative in comparison to places like the states and I know for sure that not only older but also younger audiences would not be comfortable with blatantly 양아치-looking kpop idols. More significantly, YG would be perpetually banned from all major shows and music platforms. Also, because real hip-hop/rap/ghetto KA culture is inseparable from guns and swearing (two HUGE no-no’s in general Korean culture)…perhaps YG is trying to create a new kind of ghetto gangster so that they can get away with the gangster and therefore tough image without getting banned or insulting korean audiences…? that’s prolly why the image looks kinda silly – cuz it’s like a watered down and manipulated form of hip-hop and not the all-they-way kind of deal.

      4 years ago
      • Okay this I really think is on to something. Much as we are all sitting here smugly judging and wondering why they would appropriate the imagery of the United States instead of using their own cultural references, it’s most likely that they CAN’T use their own cultural references because it would cause outrage. That makes total sense to me. Really think about it. Can you imagine all of those young kids, CL, GD, dressed up like Korean gangsters? Holy crap, just thinking about it you know that there would not be a ban stamp big enough to cover everything that would need to be banned.

        I wonder if we’re reacting because even though for them the gangster imagery is actually quite safe, for us it’s still very provocative, even after all of these years. And it’s incredibly diluted from what it used to be. I mean, I know a lot of you are very young and don’t remember (or, dear God, were not alive yet) but it caused outrage in the U.S. when gangsta rap first became popular. The government was absolutely FURIOUS that rappers were not only flaunting, but profiting off of their gang affiliations. They desperately tried to convict Snoop on anything. Anything at all. Oh my God, I feel like a little old lady gathering the young un’s round the fire to tell them bout’ the olden days.

        4 years ago
        • thx for your reply and omg i know how u feel about the old thing haha I feel like I have to whip out a blinged-out story book in front of a fireplace and read something like “Once upon a time…there were two great princes who hated each other. Their names were Tupac and Biggie.” And whenever I see fan wars, I’m just like, “aww…I wish I were still that young and immature~ Ah to be young again” haha

          I can definitely see where you’re coming from about gangster imagery, probably because as you said, we know all of the negative connotations the media puts out on gangster imagery back then and even now. However, for me personally, I still think I was more turned off because the mv showed a really wannabe gangster look without any real appreciation or understanding of hiphop or ghetto/gangster culture in america or korean american culture (i mean, if ur trying to mix Korean and American culture, no one does it better than a genuine korean american!). like i said in the huge post up there, I was pissed off that they were trying to be a wannabe Korean American when I, myself, am a Korean American from the ghetto.

          4 years ago
    • Nicely put. I’m not Korean but being Asian American I can kinda identify with how you feel. I also lived in the “hood” though I’ll admit I have been shielded from the lifestyle entirely… (it’s amazing how really, my neighbor, literally right next-door, was the leader of a drug circle o_0 and their meetups were often in the middle of the night at the corner where my house is)… It kinda annoys me when they cheapen or “glorify” the lifestyle because really, it’s not glamorous like, at all.

      4 years ago
      • Agreed. Being ghetto is one of the least glamorous things out there so
        it’s sad when people think that it’s cool to look
        ghetto..i think that kinda hooks onto what simon was saying about hip hop culture. rap was originally a source to talk about the pains and glories of the real ghetto but now…meh. not so much haha

        4 years ago
      • My parents shielded me from that lifestyle too… It took me a while to realize that a lot of places that I saw people hanging out at when I was a kid were places that drug dealings took place.

        4 years ago
        • Mm. Ditto that, even when I was told, I had a hard time believing it! Made me sad… some of these kids were my age or younger.

          4 years ago
        • Mhm… Hood life is no joke >_> Which is why it kind of pisses me off when I see *any* rapper (American or otherwise) advocating or glamourizing this kind of lifestyle. Do you not know what goes on in hoods and ghettos? Do they know what gang life is like? They show you NO mercy!!! I’ve never been in one (and I thank the good God in heaven every time I can that that’s the case), but I’ve seen the unedited stories, I’ve watched the gangsta life movies, I know people who have been in them.

          4 years ago
        • Funny thing I think people making hip hop something glamorous is kind of a statement of “even I can make something grand out of my life”. It’s not like getting famous from making hip hop songs won’t make you wanna show the world that you also can be able to live well off. People that make music and came from actual guettos are not like “hey I’m going to stay here in the ghetto just to make a statement, I want a better life too”. I don’t mean that with all “rap” artists. Nor do I think you have to have a really bad life to make rap justice. It’s just the way you convey it. How raw and good it is. A song from a Korean entertainment company? Well the only thing I know is that it feels more like a fashion statement than anything else.

          4 years ago
        • If you want to see how the American “thug” became what it is, check out the story link. Basically, those who sing about the awesome hood life, promote violence, drugs and jail time are doing so because their label is invested in local prison systems. They are making money off of innocent kids-turned-rappers in two ways. Once you go to jail, you are basically a second class citizen for life and the risk of recidivism is quite high for those with limited options and laws put in place to keep you in jail. It is a money-making business that gets paid to have “slaves” locked up and makes a huge profit off of “slave” labor.

          http://www.yourblackworld.net/2013/04/uncategorized/author-shows-compelling-connection-companies-that-promote-violent-music-also-own-private-prisons/

          4 years ago
        • Oh this is getting into Kanye territory now!

          4 years ago
        • I’ve heard about this. There weren’t many details beyond speculation that I could find, but it makes sense. Current musical trends in America are very money motivated, so this surprises me not. Thanks for the link, I’ll be checking it out later.

          4 years ago
        • There are some solid facts on the US prison system and how the prison population skyrocketed once they became privatized, despite the crime rates dropping. For a great example, check out how Arizona built a brand new multimillion dollar prison and then created new laws to ensure people would fill it. Some of you may remember on the news how they were talking about immigrant laws casting a wider net- that’s what they meant. There are statistics that clearly show there are more black men in prison than in college, and I do blame a lot of the hiphop pressure. Today’s “hip-pop” is a bastardization of the art of writing lyrics found in the original rap culture. Getting shot and going to prison are now a fad perpetuated by those who hold stock in the private business of prisons, they are a poison to young people of any race and predation of kids who are living in bad neighborhoods.

          Whoo- sorry if I got a bit too intense! I had a taste of the juvenile detention system when I wanted to pursue a career, and the truth disgusted me.

          4 years ago
        • Having walked the shadier side of the streets and the lighter side, it is true that glamorizing the lifestyle is like handing glass filled candy to kids. However, music-whether rap, hip hop, country, etc-is about expressing feeling and trying to find a connection to others. While rap is generally associated with “the hood”, I do not see why it has to be an end all be all; many who walk in the shady side like classical, country, hip hop, etc. It just depends on what makes you feel. I for one enjoy hearing rap that isn’t all about the darkness lurking on the streets and hope that anyone making music explores the many feelings that can go into the many genres.

          4 years ago
        • I, personally, don’t see it as an end all be all. You don’t have to be from the hood to be a legitimate rapper, to me; you just gotta have legit talent. I can see why people build up the fake hood image (for street cred), but if you’re really good, then you don’t need it. CL is one of those people; she’s really good (better than this, I mean XD), but she (more YGe, but she ain’t no victim) keeps building up this image of being a hood chick. If she rapped about something that she was a part of (like being a female entertainment and artist in an industry in favor of male artists), then nobody would be calling her out like this.

          4 years ago
        • I think for a woman who is going to start-hopefully really start-exploring her own individual musical style, this is a good beginning that opens up the part of her she is hoping to be able to express. If rap is going to be one of her mediums, then she will have to find her unique “feel” for it and go from there. I notice a lot of people are labeling this YG, Teddy, GD; however, for her solo she needs a launching pad and having them as her base will help since it gives her a starting point. Moving away from a group she has to identify her solid strengths and weaknesses while working them so that she can build them up into all strong points. For a solo start, this is actually good and people will watch to see if she individualizes it or if she falls into the trap of not being able to move outside of her group. I am patiently waiting for the next showing of CL, and like you, I think she is better than having to stay on someone else’s ride for long.

          4 years ago
        • This ain’t the be all and end all for CL, to me. I’m pressed because this could’t be any better than what it was, but I officially ate my words a few days ago; CL rocked this song live, so I guess this was a successful debut. What you said is very true; the girl does need a starting point. This song is catchy and it appeals to her fans, so I ain’t mad (anytime this song comes on my iPod, I chant along to the chorus like a zombie, if that shows you how much hold this woman has on me XD). I *am* patiently awaiting that album she promised a few months ago. Hell, even another single would satiate me for the time being :3 I hope the next thing she tosses out has more soul in it, because I know my girl has so much in her ^^

          4 years ago
    • What you said makes tons of sense :D And honestly, I’m not *that* offended by this mess, just embarrassed. They have honestly never been to the hood, or else they wouldn’t look so damn happy about this mess of a video XD

      4 years ago
      • LOL that’s true~

        4 years ago
      • Yeah I agree with you… That’s why I admire real korean rappers, cuz they don’t try to talk about things they never lived, you know. Like Verbal Jint, he never talks about hood things, money, bling bling and he’s a hell of a genius!

        4 years ago
        • But… CL isn’t talking about the hood
          she’s talking about money and female empowerment
          which makes sense because she’s a rich empowered female…
          She is living the lyrics in the song…

          4 years ago
        • yah, but i think the imagery in the mv also speaks for itself, and THAT definitely isn’t just about female empowerment

          4 years ago
        • Ben

          Simon isn’t just talking about the MV though. He makes it pretty clear that he doesn’t like Koreans using rap music in Kpop since rap music to him is about the struggle against the system. And Koreans don’t struggle or have hoods (which is a problematic thing to say in itself). Anyway, that’s a totally out of date view of rap that ignores the direction that the genre took in the late nineties. Hell even before that some of the biggest rap songs were tunes like Hypnotize, California Love, It’s all about the Benjamins, Insane in the Brain, and they have NOTHING to do with coping with systematic racism.

          I’m sorry but Simon really missed the mark with this blog post.

          4 years ago
        • I think this reply is going to be really off topic, but…meh i’m just pulling things outta my butt kkk Like I said in my essay of a post up there, I agree with you that a lot of rap culture (contemporary in particular though) isn’t particularly about the system, struggles, etc. Even classic rappers like Biggie are known for talking more about dem hoes and dollas (like in Hypnotize as u said). But at the same time, I can still appreciate ppl like Biggie because the reason dem hoes and dollas were so important to them was because those things in that culture obviously signified getting out of the ghetto and finally living comfortably, preferably in extreme lavish luxury with everything you would want in the ghetto but for free (so money, girls, guns, etc). So even though everything was all blinged out, I feel like it still had some kind of meaning. It wasn’t trying simply to be flashy or marketable (though that definitely was a part of it), but it was expressing an average ghetto man’s dream (girl from the ghetto talking here). Even CA Love as a party anthem, it was a party anthem partially cuz 2pac wanted to come out strong and spirited with his music after just getting bailed out of jail on traumatic accusations of sexual harassment. So even with those examples, I still felt some underlying relation to the ghetto they were representing or trying to defeat. Compare that to this single (or any mainstream “hip hop” artist these days in Korea or elsewhere) and it just looks silly (though still attractive in its own way).

          Also, what u said about the Korean hood thing reminds me that i want to say: I have friends and family in Korea who know people or are people themselves who make less than minimum wage at an hourly rate while working 6 to 7 days a week for literally 12 hours a day. Yet, for all of their hard, honest work, they still live in poor housing (almost like the projects in the states except not even government funded. they may not be tagged up like in la ktown, but u know a slum when u see one), have poor health (due to over work and the inability to buy proper food/health necessities), and are just totally unrepresented and oppressed by the system. The polarity between the rich and poor in korea is just ridiculous and the way the 1% treats the 99% is even more ridiculous. In other words, there are so many Koreans (as well as just the oppressed and struggling around the world in general) who would be able to relate to hip-hop at its best ie hip hop that does actually talk about struggles and oppression, etc. But does any mainstream artist do that these days? No. Why? Cuz profitable companies care the most simply about money and therefore, their music reflects that. This is just one more reason why I didn’t like the single and its imagery, especially when it’s coming from a lucrative company like YG. It’s a shame, really, when thinking of how much of a goldmine Korean society is for real, thought-provoking rap and music in general.

          But I don’t think simon is trying to ignore all that and i definitely don’t think that he doesn’t like korean rap. eyk has expressed a lot of positivity for other korean rap/rappers. i mean look at their interview with mfbty (tasha/jk <3). I just think simon has a problem with cl not keepin it real nuff. Also, I think simon defines "hood" as places with crack dealers and pipes lying all over the place, where weed is necessary/common, graffiti and trash even more common, and where ppl actually dress prison style. His definition doesn't just mean poor/struggling neighborhoods.

          4 years ago
        • What is it about then?

          What exactly are you seeing a problem with?

          Because to me the MV reads much like other MVs that take on a theme like Selena Gomez’s Come and Get It taking Indian and Middle Eastern themes and imagery, No Doubt has taken cultural imagery and dress, scenes from their travels such as while in Jamaica among many others or like Iggy Azalea in Bounce (she’s a Caucasian Australian who raps and took on Indian themes for a Bollywood like MV) ect…

          4 years ago
        • The problem with all of these MVs, CL’s, Selena’s, and Iggy’s (as well as dozens of other artists from around the world that do the same thing) is that they are all misappropriating a culture. Cultural misappropriation, if you haven’t been exposed to it before, (which is okay, no expects you to know everything. I just hope that if you haven’t, you’ll take this new information and apply it.) is the theft or inappropriate usage of the art, culture, or fashion of another culture. This includes taking ideas, images, styles, and important cultural symbols (like the bindi, or a Native American feathered headdress) and using them when you are not of that race or culture. The problem is that by doing this, the misappropriator strips that which they have taken of it’s cultural meaning or value, and erases what those symbols and such represent.

          4 years ago
        • I’m black and I don’t mind the hip hop in CL’s vid. Really gaiz, we’re not that sensitive!

          4 years ago
        • Some of you are obviously confused so I will end with this: Simply not being of a culture and being inspired by said culture is not wrong or bad. CL is neither Korean or Western, she’s somewhere in between because she grew up and experienced several different cultures in her lifetime. If someone identifies with a culture they are NOT automatically mis-appropriating it. The issue seems to be how much of a culture do you have to be in order to be “allowed” to express and identify with that culture.
          I think CL can identify with rap and hip-hop culture in her own way and since she neither put forth degrading images nor used people of the actual culture to seem authentic she hasn’t done anything wrong. People can still be offended if they want but that doesn’t automatically make the people who made this video guilty of anything. I think people really need to assess why they are “offended”.
          I am well aware of cultural appropriation, its nothing new to me, as I have had to deal with it coming from where I come from but I know the difference between derogatory and offensive appropriation and respectful and genuine inspiration, which doesn’t take away the cultural nuances. I think people need to stop looking at every single example of this in a purely negative light.

          4 years ago
        • I 100% agree!!!! I couldn’t have put it better myself. As a African-American who lived in the “hood” and grew-up on 90’s rap and hip-hop culture, I love this song. I finding that the lyrics are along the lines of Beyonce’s Diva and the video something close to Nicki Manji’s or late 90’s Lil Kim’s style.I don’t feel offended because I genuinely do not think that CL or YG was making a mockery of black culture or the hip-hop/ rap music genre. Some of these conversations are making it seem like you have to have your “ghetto” passport stamped with enough “street cred” stamps to even be allowed to rap?! And who said hip-hop/rap music had to always have some profound message? (Rapper’s Delight or Whoomp There It Is anyone…). That’s just my opinion. I understand that people are still gunna be offended (for this or that reason), but I just wanted to come on here show that not everyone was.

          4 years ago
        • Do

          I get what you’re trying to say, but, IMHO, it gets problematic when you strip (or simply don’t understand) the humanistic aspect of culture while pursuing pure aesthete. Here, the rap culture really loses its meaning of “coping and dealing with systematic racism, racial profiling by the police, and economic struggles,” as Simon mentions. The “hood” here truly turns into a hood, a prop used only for stylistic reasons, lacking any previous humanistic or cultural values.

          4 years ago
        • You are placing too many restrictions on rap in order to make it exclusive to America. There are people all over the world who are involved in rap culture and often the only commonalty from what you state is economic struggles. Racial profiling and racism work in only some of the non-American cases. Plenty of rappers are not from a minority or suppressed culture within their specific communities. Also you are forgetting that CL is a female and if you look at female rappers and MCs around the world and what they rap about when economic struggles are no longer an issue because they’ve become famous you’ll find more similarities than differences with what CL is doing. CL is focused on her image as a woman and how women are portrayed in Asian culture. There are humanistic and cultural values, they are just Asian not North American. Just because rap and hip-hop incubated in America’s Black and Latin communities does not mean rap and hip-hop remain static, not only has rap traveled all over the world and changed to fit local situations but rap and hip-hop within America have changed dramatically.

          4 years ago
        • Nobody is saying that rap itself should be exclusive to anyone. Rap is a type of music, but it’s the subcultures that surround rap music that are being disrespected in this video. CL is trying to emulate a rap subculture that is identified by everything you mentioned – systematic racism, consistent financial struggles, gangs, etc. – when she is clearly not meant to identify or be a part of it.

          As some other commenters have mentioned, it’s definitely the same as Selena Gomez wearing a bindi to be cute, when the bindi is highly powerful spiritual symbol in many religious and ethnic cultures (the bindi is a symbol for the Third Eye, or the “unseeing” eye that sees into the ultimate truth and purpose of one’s essence of being…definitely not something to be trivialized).

          She cheapens that rap subculture by trivializing it into something surrounding commercial beauty, especially when the culture itself is constantly depicting the struggle of reaching commercial success when the system is fighting you at every turn.

          4 years ago
        • Jo

          You’re confused, and you’re pretty closed minded about what people are trying to explain to you.
          I’ll give you a couple of examples. Women sitting on a porch doing hair and shoes strung up on an electric wire. I guarantee CL has no clue what those mean besides seeing them in a movie maybe (or whoever wrote the video treatment). Anyone who has lived in a ‘hood in America can tell you what those mean. The hair thing… no biggy. It gets hot, and you sit on your porch because you may not have power. However, seeing shoes strung up are never a good thing; why would you want to glorify that?

          People can dress however they want. People in Korea dress that way because they think it’s cool. People in the hood dress a certain way so you can identify which gang they belong to or what drugs they sell. See the difference? Gang culture isn’t cool. None of the YG clan was initiated into anything and none of them have any tattoos with meaning as to their affiliation, none of them have been locked up.
          It would have been better if they would have channeled something that makes more sense in Korea. Like Korean gang culture… because they all look like a bunch of fools.

          4 years ago
        • Well they have about as many links to Korean gangsters as American, I mean in Teddy’s case more links to American hip-hop culture really than Korean… or about the same.

          yes I found the shoes on the wire to be a tasteless way to show off Jeremy Scott’s new shoes. I’m sure someone knew what it meant though.
          but women sitting on the porch, well thats not so alien to Korea either, I don’t know that thats necessarily American hip-hop or hood exclusive.

          and to reply to your other comment here, the reality is CL released this song in 2013 not 1983, the origins of hip-hop and rap no longer apply the same way. Its no longer about what it used to be about, this song fits with the NEW norm which has moved far from hip-hop’s origins.

          4 years ago
        • Jo

          Teddy has even less experience with American Hip Hop culture than a white kid in the burbs can tell you what it’s like to live in southside Chicago… i.e. he has really none at all.

          The shoes on the wire were tasteless in general. And it was filmed in a studio. Which makes it even more glaring. When you look at American Rap videos that have scenes like that, they are actually filmed in a hood, where real shit went down. I mean who died/got the shoes mugged from them for them to show them off like that? (that’s what shoes on the wire meant where I grew up). Those shoes are God awful anyway.

          I know the origins are no longer portrayed the same way in POPULAR american rap music (your NEW NORM)… but at least american musicians have more credibility. S.Korea does not have the same history with it so it comes off as tacky. CL should have shown off what bad girls in Korea do (stay out late, go shopping, w/e)… not people who think that badass american/hip hop culture looks like this so this is what I’m going to do.

          Also, S. Korean artists have a bad way of just copying what’s on the surface because it’s popular and will make them money without understanding anything about what they are doing…
          This video reminded me of this article… http://omonatheydidnt.livejournal.com/11207901.html

          4 years ago
        • teddy and danny were bullied heavily as kids in the states for being asians. The highschool they attended have more african americans than their previous schools and somehow found their cliques and identity. Thats where they met too. The most ‘gangster’like is actually masta wu.. as some know, being yg seniors, these people bought the kids up. YG does hire people thats been jailed before. Im not saying theyre badass but they know alright. Yg building use to on BET TV 24/7.
          Simon walks around like that with real tattoos and nobody cares. Its the same here where I live. These are just styles here nth more. Western media copies asian cultures all the time big deal. Asian people speaking in funny accents on tv. Har har. Caucasians taking the roles of asians. Protrayals od east asians in american media’s history have predominantly reflected a dominant americentric perception rather than realistic and authetic depictions of true cultures, customs and behaviours. Its so often im numb to it. And even enjoyed it to some extent. Its just a set showing her chillingnwith her homegirls, yg mvs have been aboyt boobs sex booze party cigs before and has toned down so much.Its not like they suddenly changed their style to suit whats popular either. Just chill the extras are not real cholas or Mediterranean or african american stereotypes in a REAL ghetto area or whatever. More like a movie set to me. A 90’s song and vibe.
          I actually didn’t intend to join this convo. But the teddy part..

          4 years ago
        • you’re right. masta wu and perry are pretty badass. they’re the rappers who’ve lived the life everyone here’s talking about. and like you said, they brought the kids up. teddy, danny and GD especially at a very young age, they look up to masta wu and perry. so to say they have no idea about american hip hop culture… man, it ticked me off a little but i chose not to say anything since i, like you, didn’t want to join in the convo. but heck masta wu was in this MV and even he thought it wasn’t that big a deal. so am i missing something here?

          4 years ago
        • selena gomez’s mv has actually offended a lot of people of desi/south asian and middle eastern ancestry for basically taking something that was very spiritually/religiously and culturally important to them and making it into a decoration.
          no doubt also pissed a lot of people off and please, iggy azalea is like the ultimate appropriator of everything.
          people WERE getting pissed off at them, but the general (lbh, mostly white) media & (mostly white) audience had no problem with it…cus those cultures etc aren’t important to them and they didnt see anything wrong with using those cultures as decorations on a white persons body. its kindof like when someone wears a band tshirt and doesnt know who they are but just likes the look of the tshirt and people who actually like that band get pissed off.
          or like when people buy tickets to beyonces tour in huge numbers to sell them off at extornionate prices rather than let actual beyonce fans buy tickets at the regular price and enjoy themselves without starving. kind of.
          like, selena is making so much money off her ‘indian’ stuff but how much of it actually goes back to actual indian people who are part of the culture she uses? and thanks to her mv, she has basically popularised bindis and whatnot into being this cute decoration that you stick onto your forehead to make yourself look exotic. which is not what it is. actual desi women who wear bindis all the time will get racially harassed and discriminated against, called a ‘dot-head’ and w/e, but its fine as long as white girls can look pretty? :/

          4 years ago
        • What?
          I’m sorry but what do ticket scalpers have to do with anything in this discussion?
          Is Beyonce and her concerts a culture?
          and T-shirts, yes people can be attracted to the aesthetics of a logo and not the brand itself
          I don’t understand what this has to do with everything.

          And the issue with Iggy and Selena was sexualization no?

          4 years ago
        • Cultural appropriation 101. It doesn’t hurt as much if it’s not your culture that’s been appropriated. The Selena Gomez song is similar to what Shakira did in taking a West African rhyme and making it the theme for the World Cup. I told my friends, “hey, I grew up listening to that” and they responded “that’s not possible, Shakira just released it”. Cultural appropriation invalidates, exorticizes and commodifies, and there’s no excuse for this!

          4 years ago
        • honey, i think ur starting to take this personally ;; if u think that, then that’s what u think and we respect that. and even if we didn’t respect it, as long as you do, that’s all that matter. if you want to know what i think it’s about, i wrote a whole essay-long post right up there

          4 years ago
  186. Simon i totally agree with your post!! that’s kinda what i tried to say before….but being me it totally flopped cos i’m so freakin’ bad at explaining myself!!! honestly i’m just so bad i actually accidently end up offending someone!! i’m genuinely saying something nice to them and it comes out wrong, they get shocked and i’m there like ‘oh god i didn’t mean it in a bad way!!’

    ahahah GD being pantless……and looking kinda like an old man with a walking stick!!

    BWAHAHAHAHAHHAHA OH MY GOODNESS GANGSTER SIMON SKIT WAS AWESOME!!!!!!!!! aww poor him and his thug life…..who knew unwrapping a macaroon could be so difficult!!
    Spudgy song was sick!! not in a throw-up-in-your-face way, but a good way!! (ahahahah sos…i’m being lame)

    4 years ago
  187. Yg, what’s going on lately.. . Innovation and good music for which they are known, not gong on more. Have lost their essence, his touch… All the music they draw lately, is repetitive and empty… Now I feel that the new groups are those who are concerned to innovate… and as they know that the fans buy anything, make recycling of their previous songs… I do not know, this song seems very monotonous, nothing original and even less surprising, I think it’s time to renew producers and the entire design team and image in yg, because even the design of the logo does not say much and recycling..

    This song and video do not do justice to the talent and potential of Cl, the video looks like a fashion show… this makes me sad she is fierce on stage, but hopefully not too distant future she can demonstrate the true baddest female she is..

    4 years ago
  188. OK, I agree with you on the rap and YG aspect but I don’t agree with you on your opinion of the song. You say that this is like one of the worst YG songs to date, I do not agree. I like all of YG songs, they bring something new to the cutesy K-Pop scene. In actuality, I think the K-Pop world is a picky one. You either like a song or you don’t like a song and if the majority of the world who likes a song then they’ll jump on it, but if the majority of the world hates a song, then they’ll jump away! But what about those who like the song…there are a very few of us and we want to be respected…

    4 years ago
    • You can’t honestly be telling him to not say that he dislikes the song that you like because you find it disrespectful can you? Maybe I’m just reading your comment incorrectly but that’s what it’s coming across as but if you are saying that… sit down somewhere.

      4 years ago
  189. Totally agree with you guys about the vid (tho more with Martina on the song)

    Also, I feel like with GD’s version of gangster – at least some of his personality comes through and he has some symbolism and stuff… but with CLs it felt like she wasn’t being herself. She often says that ‘CL’ is her persona on stage and Lee Chaerin is different (cuter, sweeter etc) – and I think that is fine within a group, but for solo activities it is easy to tell when you aren’t being genuine so it comes off as her just trying to be a female GDragon…

    I love you CL, but not this song sorry…

    4 years ago
    • I agree. The saving grace of GD’s gangster inspired videos is that it is infused with his personality. We all know that CL is fierce, but this vid felt manufactured, and that’s a pity.

      Anyhow its only the first single. Looking forward to better videos :)

      4 years ago
      • Well, G-Dragon’s video was self-aware. He isn’t gangsta at all (*side eyes the rainbowlicious cutesy concepts he has inflicted upon BIGBANG*), so his was more just him making fun of himself.

        4 years ago
        • I should’ve put my ‘gangster’ in ‘GD’s gangster inspired vids’ in quotation marks. But then GD and TOP’s Knockout was acceptable…..wouldn’t that count?

          Ah well, lemme aju bbeokigayo outta here, lol (get it? no? :( )

          4 years ago
        • Hmm… You have big point there. I just watched Knockout and you’re right, it is definitely G-Dragon :3 Even though T.O.P is there too… I just don’t really see much in the way of personality from T.O.P. I see swagger (once again, I feel so uncool writing that XD), I see looks, I hear a decent flow, but hardly any personality.

          4 years ago
  190. I might have had too high expectations on CLs solo debut because I was very disappointed when I heard this. I honestly didn’t like the song at all on the first listen.. It just felt.. slow? and also kinda like a “female GD” unfortunately. It is, however, starting to grow on me now.

    Fave solo song out of CL and Bom’s is definitely Bommie’s Don’t Cry! I looooooooove this song so question was easy to answer :)

    4 years ago
  191. Even though I really liked this song from CL, I’m glad that you guys tried to address a problem I’m continuing to see in kpop: appropriation of black culture. You’re right, the entire aesthetic of the video is totally “icky” and shows a total ignorance and complete lack of understanding about the roots and the meaning of black hip-hop/ rap culture. Regardless of whether or not the concept of the video was made with or without malicious intent, the fact still stands that many k-pop entertainment groups and artists continue to appropriate black culture. And in 2013, there is really no excuse for a million dollar (if not billion dollar) industry to continue to operate under this ignorance and essentially let (some of) their artists parade around in pseudo black face. It’s disrespectful to the originators and the current artists of the genre. I’m not saying that k-pop entertainment companies should completely remove the aesthetic from their portfolios, however, especially now that they have a very large international audience, they should be more weary of the way they present themselves (because a lot of the utilization of this aesthetic ia extremely racist, for example gd’s “tribute” to andre 3000 (its literally blackface) and gikwang of BATOOST aka B2ST also in blackface). Anyway, I’m glad that you two address it and I hope to see you guys address more of this stuff in the future. Simon & Martina

    화이팅!~

    4 years ago
  192. ok here’s my take. suju dresses up like opera people (?). shinee dresses up like angel people (??). and YG dresses their artists up like “hip hop people”. just another costume. (i have to think this way or my brain starts to hurt with the inappropriateness of it all)

    4 years ago
  193. I understand what Simon is saying about the whole ‘hood’ concept, but that’s just YG for you. I think they get away with it, because anything hiphop related (in Korea) is associated with YG. I personally loved the song. ^^~ I thought the mv was promoting feminism, since despite having a huge group of guys ‘hanging out’ CL was owning it. I loveeee you, CL unnie. P.s Loved the skit guys, the eyk crew are amazing. Lots of love, from London x

    4 years ago
    • No, the underground hiphop/rap scene in korea has nothing to do with yg

      4 years ago
      • I agree, since underground hiphop can’t be associated by idol groups. However, hiphop in general I feel people associate with YG, due the image their artists portray and music they produce.

        4 years ago
  194. Okay EXOtics lets get Exo-voted in next week because I feel like Simon and Martina could have some fun with Wolf <3 Even when they hate songs I love, I still love to watch their music Mondays<3

    4 years ago
  195. So i’m kinda curious~

    Lots of people are complaining about YG’s style. What exactly would everyone like to see instead from YG? What should they change? And what should they keep?

    I just wanna see everyone’s opinion :D

    4 years ago
    • I don’t dislike YG’s style. The problem is, I feel lately YG’s been lazy. YG’s put out better music before and they will in the future. I liked the song and I still know they could’ve gave CL a better song. Instead he gave her an okay song just because he knew she had the general popularity to make it chart. Also YG talks a lot of stuff but I’m still waiting on a Taeyang solo album, Kang Seungyoon’s debut, and YG’s new girl group, which all are no where to be seen.

      Also the inclusion of the whole “YG gang” concept was just stupid. Gangs aren’t concepts, they aren’t cool to be apart of, and they shouldn’t be portrayed in a positive light. Maybe they saw it in a music video and thought “that’s cool we should do that” but what rappers portray in music videos in the US is usually their real life. People that look like gang members are usually gang members, it’s not a concept or a character to play.

      4 years ago
      • I’m not sure that YG has been lazy…. They look like they put in lots of effort into there work, so rather than lazy, maybe its just more that they are missing the mark more often than they used to?
        They aren’t as in tune with what people want, maybe.

        Honestly though, I think the only YG release recently that I’ve been disappointed with is Michigo… aaand I’ll admit that I thought Lee Hi’s Rose could have been SO much better. But I still consider both works to be good, just not AS good as what I expect from YG. Maybe CL’s falling into that category as well.

        As for the gang thing… I agree to an extent. Yeah, gangs are bad… but lots of people adopt the style as an image, both in the sense of fashion and the sense of entertainment. For example, I see lots of people who dress hip-hop-like, who are not actually connected to gangs. And that’s where “hiphop” style originated from, right?

        And sometimes, maybe it is taken too far?

        When I saw the “cholo-style” scene in CL’s mv, I wasn’t offended/disturbed, because as a half-Mexican I grew up with the “cholo” look being glorified and romanticized…with all the bad stuff being conveniently forgotten or hardly acknowledged.
        I’m not saying its good or bad.. just that I’m probably too used to this stuff happening already, that it doesn’t bother me when I see it in YG’s stuff. So far.

        4 years ago
        • Honestly I just don’t think it’s enough effort. The truth is YG is a business and while they could’ve made every single “meh” song they’ve put out recently much better, I fully believe that YG made the a business move to release them as is because it would save time and they would still get money for it. YG has the status where as long as the big names sing it, people will watch and listen anyway. I fully trust that when YG puts out anything with an album attached to it they’ll try to make it a great album but when it’s just songs for short promos, we get “meh” level songs.

          Also I cannot let this pass as “hiphop style”. Hip hop style and gang style are too different things. They aren’t up there in over sized t’s, hi tops, and fitted caps. They’re up there in ski masks and bandanas leaning up against low riders. I’m not offended that they took hiphop style. I’m offended they’re portraying a gang because they just shouldn’t. Nobody walks around covered in a bandana without being involved in a gang. I mean even if they saw that in a video, whens the last time a popular rapper even featured a gang? This isn’t even a relevant theme anymore. I wouldn’t have minded the chola part if the back up dancers weren’t covered in ski masks, that’s one of the things that changed it from a fashion style to a gang portrayal. For the most part hip hop style is just baggy pants, hats, hi tops and oversized shirts from the 1980’s to the early 2000’s.

          4 years ago
    • I have nothing against YG’s appreciation and fascination of black culture, but showing it this way is not cutting it. I’d like them (along with all the other K-Pop companies out their) to find their own identity

      4 years ago
      • That’s interesting. :)

        How can they know when they’ve crossed the line though? Even I don’t understand, I think. ^^;

        4 years ago
    • Actually, I wish they focused less on image and more on music. Almost all of their videos from 2012 and 2013 were rather fashion shows than music videos!

      4 years ago
      • Yep, agree…. YG changes outfits waaay too much sometimes DX

        The first thing I thought of when I read your comment was BB’s “Monster.” Too many outfits…. but a good song though. ^^

        4 years ago
    • Like personally, I wish GD would tone it down a bit… he’s getting too weird even for my inner GD-fangirl. Still love him though, don’t get me wrong. o.o

      4 years ago
  196. It has bothered me for the longest time trying to figure out who CL reminds me of. I finally figured it out! She looks a lot like Adrienne Maloof from the Real Housewives of Beverly Hills! lol

    http://www.bravotv.com/people/adrienne-maloof/bio

    4 years ago
  197. I still love this song, but i understand why (Kind of) you don’t like it. I mean i am a very open minded person with a song, so unless i don’t like their voice or how they are being used in the public (likeoneartistishallnotname) I really wanted to see your review, because i knew it would make me laugh a lot.

    Also Simon, don’t forget the song was only 70bpm, so it was a slowish song. I wonder if that’s why you didn’t really like it?

    Anyways, I vote Park Bom, I love her voice. not that I don’t Love Cl’s Voice, but i generally prefer songs that help me relax, even if Don’t Cry makes me wanna cry like a sissy whiny baby.

    4 years ago
  198. I really appreciate your comments about the commodification/commercialization of “hip-hop culture”. Very well said!

    4 years ago
  199. Seriously someone needs to email this portion to YG Entertainment:

    “When I think of rap videos, they usually depict a culture, rather than just an aesthetic. Like “this is what our lives are like. This is what we go through.” Rap music, to me, is more than just music. There’s an overarching narrative of coping and dealing with systematic racism, racial profiling by the police, and economic struggles. At least, that’s what I think of when I listen to rap. I could be wrong in that; I could be seeing something that isn’t necessarily there, and so my conclusions based on those assumptions could then be unfounded. If I’m right, then, to see YG and CL use that specific aesthetic, which kinda symbolizes something more to me than just something that looks cool, I feel a bit icky. The people of YG, I doubt, went through that struggle, so to imitate the genre, aesthetic, and imagery so closely really hits me as insincere. Innocent? Sure! Malicious? No way. I’m sure that there’s a genuine appreciation of rap as an artform, but an understanding of it as a culture?”

    Simply looking at music as just music, I loveeeee this song I mean it’s sooo catchy and the dance is hilarious. But looking into the deeper sense of music, I agree that it’s usually about expressing your feelings and showcasing who you especially rap music and while this aesthetic rapping is superfun and catchy, it has a certain ingenuity about it. Don’t get me wrong tho I love YG

    4 years ago
    • Exactly! And it makes me mad see people talkin about some k-pop rappers as being awesome when there are true genius in the real korean rap scene.

      4 years ago
    • THIS!!! I need to gives this more +1’s, like seriously XD

      4 years ago
  200. the first time i heard the song i said it sounds like a mix of feeldog/junhyung/le’s you got some nerve and harlem shake with the typical YG mv, but i dont like it…at all…i’m on simons side here. i loved the skit about trying to find the hood, also (it’s not relevant to the song but i want to say it anyways) martina looks really good with the dark hair and simon you look so skinny, are you sure you had all those meals in singapore?
    the baddest spudgy… i’m definitely going to buy that one!

    4 years ago
  201. I really enjoyed this MM. I loved your honesty and the skits. It was surprisingly entertaining. Thanks for always being honest and fun!

    4 years ago
  202. There are parts of the MV and song I really liked but overall I was hoping for more. For a song all about how CL is the baddest female etc. etc. I wish they had actually shown her doing something to earn that title. I mean even in ‘I Am The Best’ the girls smash cases and wield guns. In this MV.. um CL is bad because LOOK AT ALL HER DIFFERENT OUTFITS and she has a whip yeah. While I usually don’t like when people compare artists (as it is often unwarranted) I think Lee Hyori did a much better job of showing a bad girl image.

    4 years ago
    • Definitely!

      4 years ago
    • I started a bit late with Kpop I still don’t understand how she go the name of Baddest Female. What did she do to earn it? I have seen her perform on stage and she has great charisma but I don’t see anything “badass” about her.

      4 years ago
      • As far as I remember (it’s a bit hard to check currently as all the google results are about the new single! If I’m wrong someone correct me ^^), the name was given to her by Teddy in reference to her charisma and strong performance style. The first time I remember it being used, in a song anyway, is in ‘The Leaders’ in 2009. So she has been called it for years now. It’s a name CL herself likes and she often signs autographs with it.

        As for how bad CL is, in a recent interview she said this:

        Q: What is a “Bad Girl?▶CL: Someone who strives in their field and someone who is passionate as well as confident and someone knows how to speak their mind.

        so it’s clear she means bad not in the sense that she does bad things or behaves in a particular bad-ass manner Still I would have liked to see her be more active in the MV rather than just posing and dancing in various outfits..

        4 years ago
      • I’ve been into 2ne1 since their debut and it’s something she’s always had. So, I don’t think she’s “earned” it as you’re talking about. It’s just always been her image as being this strong and independent person who can hang with the boys. She reminds me a lot of the rapper Tasha (look her up if you aren’t familiar with her).

        4 years ago
  203. I actually really liked this song, even though I don’t normally like rap (though that may be why I liked this song). I wish I could defend why I like this song, since it’s not a genre I like and I completely agree with all the negative aspects you pointed out especially the rap-culture-out-of-context-y-ness of the song, but I just can’t. I’m also not a mega huge 2ne1 fan, so I know I don’t just like it for that reason. i really am getting confused with myself on why I like this but, I just can’t explain it.

    PS. Park Bom all the way on votes, hadn’t heard this song until just now but yes, it’s awesome.

    4 years ago
  204. Point blank…CL was trying too hard to re-appropriate a culture that her and her “crew” in the background no nothing about. For me that made me disappointed.

    4 years ago
  205. I may not like “Baddest Female” or it’s MV but I do love your review of it, especially Simon looking for a hood to accept in him in Korea. Martina the question I’ve been having about GD’s lack of pants is, is he wearing short shorts OR are this his underwear? I need to know lol!

    4 years ago
    • Someone posted a picture of what he was wearing down the page.

      4 years ago
      • Hehehe, I posted one also :) I found it after another wonderful Nasty told me the brand, Mugler. Found the shorts online for $600!. I’m still not convinced they aren’t underwear XD

        4 years ago
    • I read somewhere that these are short shorts by Mugler… The ironic thing is that this tiny piece of fabric costs probably an arm and a leg!

      4 years ago
      • Here’s a screen shot. Sorry for so many posts, technology is not being my friend today.

        4 years ago
      • Oh my I do believe I found said shorts O_O but their website, not this one, is being a jerk and won’t let the link connect correctly >_<!

        4 years ago
      • All those clothes cost an arm and a leg. I’ve looked up Chrome Hearts and they have $600 tank tops! :-O

        4 years ago
        • YG should rather spend money on scenarists. Most of their videos for 2012 and 2013 are focused on the clothes and accessories. I miss their videos with a plot and some acting!

          4 years ago
        • But they reuse a lot of it though too. I’ve seen 2ne1 wear things BB has worn and vice versa. So I figure they have jewelry they all share and then they prob buy their own.

          4 years ago
        • Then, they could sell some and hire scenarists!

          4 years ago
        • Probably haha. But yeah I like video’s like “Haru Haru” where there’s a nice storyline to go with the song.

          4 years ago
        • …And I’m sure Haru Haru cost much less money, even though it’s still a classic!

          4 years ago
        • ME TOOOOOOOO! I was rewatching Lies and Haru Haru the other day, wishing they would do something like those again.

          4 years ago
      • Exacty >_>

        4 years ago
  206. I’ll accept this video if you lie to me and say those are Korean Americans. Then yeah, I will totally buy it because I’ve seen a few hoody-hood Asian Americans in my day. I just don’t like gangster glamorization full stop. I live in Chicago, where gangsters kill each other daily and cause mass disruptions. They hold entire sections of the city hostage by being ever present. Children start getting recruited in 4th and 5th grade. Those who don’t join do so at their peril. This video is presenting it as “sexy” and “assertive” but in reality it’s tragic.
    Anyhoo, off of my soapbox now. It is an interesting video.

    4 years ago
  207. I saw your tweet about you might saw CL at Teddy’s cafe. Yeah she was there for an interview today!!

    4 years ago
  208. Totaly my thoughts also!!

    4 years ago
  209. I agree with everything you’ve said, however one has to question whether the appropriation of rap culture is limited to people outside of the culture, and not found within as well. What I mean is, you see a similar commercialisation of rap culture in artists who had come from the lifestyles associated with classic rap (less advantaged, for example). For example, you see it in Nicki Minaj and for that matter, any rap artist who’s song lyrics are primarily about money, ‘bitches’, and, really, just meaningless empty content. That too feels like an appropriation of rap culture, but would it be considered okay because the artists doing it can claim that they ‘have the right’ because they ‘come from the hood’?. At this point, the matter no longer comes back to respecting the culture, but rather selecting who /deserves/ to approach the genre. Which feels like a limitation that should never be placed in music. Just food for thought.

    4 years ago
    • I’ve always had a problem with people who glamourize the hood lifestyle, because there’s nothing glamourous about it. No matter if they have no idea what they’re pushing like CL, or if they’ve lived it, escaped, and built their career off of it like Nicki Minaj.

      4 years ago
    • no nicki minaj is a different genre is rap. in her videos she does not represent the gangster culture she represents the rich or the i dont give a fuck culture and that is why i have a problem with cl’s mv bc she is representing the i dont give a fuck culture not the i have struggles

      4 years ago
      • That is true, but her origins are not dissimilar to the artists we see who’s songs focus on their struggles, as opposed to the more commercial approach to rap Nicki takes. (Having said that, she does still represent the same rap culture that more emotionally engaged rappers do, it is in fact an extension of that culture that spawns the ‘I’m rich and I don’t give a fuck” attitude portrayed in their songs. They will always, for example, refer to the fact that they started from nothing, and they are still ‘hood’). What I’m trying to get at is that people feel rap should only belong to the people who grew up in that manner, and CL and YG (however right the criticisms are, I take no sides) have been seen to ‘disrespect’ that culture in a way that Nicki (or the other artists similar to her) hasn’t been, despite the styles of the song being similar. Also, you say you dislike the song because CL is representing the ‘I don’t give a fuck culture’, but wouldn’t it be dishonest of her to invent struggles to sing about? That’s not really related to my original point, but I just wanted to ask for your thoughts.

        4 years ago
        • I dont dislike the song because CL is representing the ‘I don’t give a fuck culture’ its just that her video does not really represent that. idk but the video just does not sit right with me especially the end seen. its just made me feel eaky. You said “her [Cl’s] origins are not dissimilar to the artists we see who’s songs focus on their struggles” can you give me an example of that. And yes the i dont give a fuck genre of rap did spread from the rap culture of struggles, i agree with you on that. The disrespect I felt was the last scene in the video. Nicki Minaj has not shown disrespect for me because she understands how it is, she came from the underground. No matter how much you hate it, in the rape culture you HAVE to earn your respect. I feel CL has yet to earn that respect. I will have no trouble if she was Korean American but she is not. Korean Americans know about struggles because they are a minority in the US and well America is not as beautiful and welcoming as it is made to be. She is undermining their struggles.

          4 years ago
        • Oh no, I meant Nicki’s struggles. I don’t believe CL does have similar origins. Sorry, I should have phrased that better. But yeah, I agree with what you’re saying. I think that is why the video doesn’t sit quite right, like you said. Thank you for taking the time to talk to me (:

          4 years ago
        • Oh haha ok that makes more sense i thought you meant Cl had similar struggles like nicki and I was like O_o o…k…. Lol and yeah same to u it was nice sharing thoughts ^^

          4 years ago
        • I dont dislike the song because CL is representing the ‘I don’t give a fuck culture’ its just that her video does not really represent that. idk but the video just does not sit right with me especially the end seen. its just made me feel eaky. You said “her [Cl’s] origins are not dissimilar to the artists we see who’s songs focus on their struggles” can you give me an example of that. And yes the i dont give a fuck genre of rap did spread from the rap culture of struggles, i agree with you on that. The disrespect I felt was the last scene in the video. Nicki Minaj has not shown disrespect for me because she understands how it is, she came from the underground. No matter how much you hate it, in the rape culture you HAVE to earn your respect. I feel CL has yet to earn that respect. I will have no trouble if she was Korean American but she is not. Korean Americans know about struggles because they are a minority in the US and well America is not as beautiful and welcoming as it is made to be. She is undermining their struggles.

          4 years ago
  210. I think you guys should extend that arguing time; I wanna hear more from both sides (y’know?).
    30 seconds is not quite enough :/

    4 years ago
  211. Awwww, my sis and I have been waiting around hoping for a Vixx Kpop Music Monday this week, who won’t last another week is my guess, but I suppose it won’t be reviewed now……….. Oh, well. Yay for CL.

    4 years ago
  212. please, yg has about as much to do with rap as the black eyed peas and nicki minaj. they did not start the appropriation and commercialization and they are not going to end it. kpop fans that praise 2ne1 and g-dragon for being hardcore rap need a music 101 or a new set of ears. i like both but come on, get some perspective….

    4 years ago
    • It’s the fact that that’s been their angle for the last year

      4 years ago
      • yes, but they did not develop the ’emptiness’ simon/martina are writing about. that is all american, it has had nothing to do with rap when yg stumbled upon it.

        4 years ago
  213. But… but… VIXX? :(

    Oh well. I really really love your guise’s “news segments” hahaha. It’s like, a fresh spin on your skits. And your whole point about the gangster thing is spot on

    S-P-U-to the D-G-Y

    4 years ago
  214. I think people read too much into that one scene and let it defy the rest of the song and video for them. I don’t think they’re trying to pretend to be something they’re not, but are paying homage to the type of music they grew up with and fell in love with and inspired them to become what they are now. Yes, authentic rap music is about overcoming hardships something that they probably know nothing about, but who’s to say they haven’t been able to relate to that same music in their own right? You can’t just sit there and judge them, saying they’re trying to act hard, when that’s probably not even it at all. They love that style. They admire that art form. All of them have that love for rap. Just because they were raised in Korea, where “hoods don’t exist”, why can’t they show their appreciation for it?

    4 years ago
    • O_o why would you show appreciation for the hood culture?

      to me the point is do they even really know about the hood culture? or are they just seeing it over TV or however they know about it, while in their amazing houses with luxury products besides them….
      personally kinda makes me feel icky too like Simon, especially since they haven’t even experienced the ‘hood’ life!

      4 years ago
  215. i think what YG’s trying to do is to own ‘Hip Hop’
    rather than embracing it, they want to develop
    their own Hip Hop culture, which pretty much gives them
    both pros and cons. they are ambitious and here’s
    appreciation for that but heavy styling with branded thangs?
    they need to use better handprops or accessories or whatever things they
    wanna use. they are calling for angry stereotype-r and put some labels on them
    which later encourages ugly fanwars and netizen-shaming!

    well, about the song -I love the chorus but other than that…

    2NE1 need a comeback asap!

    4 years ago
  216. ed

    This is epic!

    4 years ago
  217. I’m satisfied with her song the first time i listened to it, i’m just happy people now finally appreciates the song after seeing CL’s debut stage. She made a lackluster song work through her performance though haha, i smile to every comment cause they are mostly positive now than in the MV so yeah i still believe CL has so many in store for us in the future and this is just the beginning for The Baddest Female ;]

    As for choosing between my girls CL and Park Bom..

    I will always love Park Bom’s solos, til this day i still sing You and I randomly when it comes up to my player and Don’t Cry as well. The thing about CL is, she makes the lackluster song work through her performances though, i am beyond satisfied even when she just debuted with it. Check out the comments on her performance many were not so sure about the song but now it’s growing on them since she perormed it hehe. So yeah i’d go for CL, performance-wise, delivery, etc she gives the song justice lol. What if she came out with an amazing track and not this? Rest assure she’ll rock 10x more right? :)

    4 years ago
  218. I totally 110% agree with your perspective on YG and their take on “gangster” culture. They really commercialize and “beautify” (?) it–I really love Tablo and Zico’s take on rap though–they may not be talking about racism or gang culture, but they present korean culture as it’s own thing through rap, which I’m sure you’ve heard through their songs (WOW that doesn’t make sense OTL)
    YG is “real”, but I feel artists like Tablo and Zico are “raw” because they make music not only to make money (YG does too but i feel like it’s different….GAH)
    Ya feel? :)

    4 years ago
    • Yup, I like Epik High as well. And I agree, I love to see the melding music culture and styles all while the artist is making it their own.

      4 years ago
    • YG is 100% motivated by money. They’re the number 3 entertainment agency in Korea; you don’t get that big unless you’re trying >_>

      4 years ago
      • if you really think they are, then you don’t know one whit about them

        4 years ago
        • MichiGo and the Baddest Female have very little thought put into them, and if you don’t think that Papa YG threw them out into the wild for the simple purpose of making money, then you are a bit naive my friend

          4 years ago
      • I genuinely think that YG was created for making new and good music in first place. Now it’s different, the part of money in their motivation seems to be growing every year, now it must be close to 100% indeed ^^

        4 years ago
        • well, to be fair he did get publically listed finally. so maybe it’s due to that that he needs to focus more on the financial side. he was the last of the big 3 to get publically listed i think. so maybe he’s had people breathing down his neck for more profit? lol.

          4 years ago
        • Yeah, makes sense. If I remember well, the moment they entered Kosdaq matches with the moment YG started throwing money out of the window to impress everyone while saving on MV scenarii.

          4 years ago
        • yup. and that’s when YG’s management problems started to arise too. the thing with supearls, and 2ne1’s comeback, the delay with YG’s supposed new girl group and boy group debut. etc etc. hmm. haha.

          4 years ago
        • I can agree with that

          4 years ago
  219. Gotta admit the baddest female live is good!

    4 years ago
  220. The song is awesome IMHO. I gave it a few listens and it grew on me, and now I’m listening to it while working out (Heck yeah I’m a bad girl. LOL), and need a kick of energy. It’s awesome seeing more women in the Kpop industry writing their own lyrics and busting out not like a cutesy girl, but a grown fierce female. Props to CL.

    The scene with CL and the YG guys, was symbolic I think. It showed a woman can hold her own in a “man’s world.” This song is all about confidence.

    Funny video and review guise!! Gangsta Simon and Reporter Martina LOL! And the Spudgy version of the song: awesome!

    4 years ago
  221. Well for me I think the video was showing all the different types of bad girls out there… We have the girly, the bad as bad as, the gangsta and so on. I think to show that there are a lot of different types of bad. The video was awesome as it is, and I really enjoyed it.

    I really enjoyed this song too, and I really think it shows who CL is, she has always been that hip hop rapper girl, and for me it would have been weird if this wasn’t her debut solo song, ’cause if she had done anything in style with 2ne1, it would have been wrong, since we all know that CL style and 2ne1 style isn’t the same.

    I know some think that is is more GD style, but remember GD and CL’s style are pretty close to each other, they both have this bad ass hip hop thing over them, but for me this was CL and not GD, I don’t know if i’m the only one thinking that.

    The Mv is bad ass, the song is bad ass, CL is bad ass, I can’t find anything wrong with the song nor the MV… Well maybe the pant less GD… That just cracked me up xD

    And btw i totaly agreed to wath YG told CL; it doesn’t matter how much you win, you should just have fun with what you are doing. And on her debut stage you could tell how much fun she had! And for me to see that I’m happy ^^

    4 years ago
    • “Well for me I think the video was showing all the different types of bad girls out there” huh i never thought of this i can see that

      4 years ago
      • Haha, I just thought about that, since she says herself “This is for all my bad girls out there”… And well all the different types of girl she shows, I don’t know, I just thought about it xD

        4 years ago
  222. I didn’t like CL’s song at first and I still don’t liiiike it, but I don’t hate it either I suppose. What surprises me is that even Exo’s Wolf is growing on me more than this song!

    But the skits in this MM are hilarious and so well done, and the camera angles are great! I agree all the way about GD’s lack of pants, too :P

    4 years ago
  223. yeah i agree with most of the stuff here but i would like everyone to keep in mind there are different genres of rap. ex nicki minaj is more of the rap genre i think cl was aiming for BUT when u look at her mv, nicki minaj is NOT portrayed as gangster and that is the main reason i have a problem with the cl’s mv. that kind or rap genre is portrayed or associated with money or having fun and not giving a fuck it is NOT portrayed with the gangster culture bc the gangster culture is like simon said about the struggles of life

    the song tho was good, the beat was awesome (did not like the dubstep at all) but yeah it did not have powerful bamf other songs with this style are associated with

    4 years ago
  224. On some level I agree with Simon, that wearing hip-hop outfits and making rap doesn’t make you gangsta. I think, in order to create hip-hop music, artists have to be into hip-hop culture. That means they can’t just wear oversized clothing and shake the heads to the beat, they have to know the origins of the hip-hop culture, they have to be aware at leatst of some basic hip-hop dancing steps. And in the case of YG artists (rappers mainly) I usually see some rapping about how badass they all are. It doesn’t feel right.
    But on the other hand, if I’m not thinking about all the gangsta stuff, I like korean hip-hop songs, although I never consider them real hip-hop, I don’t know why.

    4 years ago
  225. My take on the rap culture appropriation is that well..
    if that is the case then only people from American hoods can do rap?
    Or is it more that they appropriated specific non-Korean visuals?

    As for hoods in Korea… news flash they do exist!!!
    They are just aesthetically different of course
    yes there is a Korean mob and Korean gangsters
    but they have more in common with Japanese Yakuza than American gangs
    but they also run prostitutes, act as loan sharks and break people’s legs

    Actually Korean “ghettos” are disproportionately filled with the elderly
    who also have a ridiculously high suicide rate
    Yes you live in the nice areas of the country and go to tourist destinations
    and yes Koreans are very interested in hiding their slums
    but they exist, people living without running water or electricity in shacks
    whole towns of them, let alone the poor neighborhoods with water and electricity

    Here’s an article: http://www.rappler.com/world/14640-seoul-slum-life-in-the-shadow-of-gangnam-style
    how the government deals with slums: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lf4Ws25GnDQ

    4 years ago
    • We’re not saying Korea doesn’t have poor neighbourhoods or gangsters. We know they do (BTW did you know Bucheon was supposedly the gangster city of Korea? Korean gangster dress differently than what was depicted in this video) Our complaint is that they didn’t use images of Korean slums, they used images that represent poorness/ghettoness from OTHER cultures. Actually, it would have been great if they could have brought attention to problems in Korea via this video, but instead their aim was to look cool. There is actually a lot of awesome underground Korean hip hop that deals with real life Korean issues, but as per underground rap tradition in any country, it remains out of the mainstream marketing. Ps-> This is not an angry comment! :D

      4 years ago
      • Having grown up in a very poor neighborhood here in the US, I have known and been surrounded by the hood my whole life, even presently and I moved out those neighborhoods long ago. Being from the hood and gangsta, or here the barrio and being a cholo, isn’t a fashion trend with a pricey monetary label on it, it is a chosen lifestyle that is really hard to break away from. And believe me no one is wearing $200 Chrome Hearts beanies, they are wearing $5 ones from Kmart. Just my own observation on the “gangsta” YG life :-P

        4 years ago
      • But they can’t depict Korean ghettos or talk about those issues in mainstream music
        SeoTaiJi and Boys (and Seo TaiJi alone) is one of the few huge exceptions
        Not to mention CL has been more influenced by foreign rap culture than Korea’s underground
        considering she lived abroad so much of her life

        and in the video you said: “where are these ghettos”
        well I’m saying they exist they are there,
        so like I said your problem is that they took non-Korean aesthetics
        but if they do try and represent that not only will they get censored
        but they’ll get the same treatment Seungri got for having a one night stand
        you just can’t have that type of image unfortunatly
        they can’t even date without it being an issue

        and Nyokou made my point spectacularly
        if you represent what is actually happening you’re looked down on
        you get censored and banned, you’re not “respectable”
        its the unfortunate reality of K-pop

        4 years ago
        • Hip hop started as a way to speak out. To vent. Censorship shouldn’t be a reason to not speak what you have to say in hip hop culture.
          Some YG stans look down on kpop idols as being fake and manufactured but YG artists not dealing with the issues by sugar coating or ignoring them is just as fake and manufactured in my mind. This just rubs me the wrong way.
          You think the original pioneers of hip hop were looking for approval?

          4 years ago
        • Agreed.

          4 years ago
        • Has CL time-traveled to the past and done hip-hop then?
          or is she doing it in the modern day K-pop context?
          Because yes, LMFAO raps and they are totally venting and making a deep statement.

          This song is about CL’s life
          she’s a rich, empowered female who gets called a bad girl for behaving certain ways
          so she’s owning that bad girl title and making it her own
          she’s rapping about female empowerment and all her bling
          thats her reality.

          4 years ago
        • Would I call LMFAO rappers? Hell no.

          4 years ago
        • What does it matter what YOU call them?
          They are rappers, fact.
          So was Vanilla Ice.
          So is middle-class, teen actor Drake.

          No one is saying CL is Biggie or Lil’ Kim
          Rap music is no longer a shunted underground music style led by people with shady pasts.
          Its a million dollar industry in which 80% of songs are about money.
          This song fits right into that industry and aesthetic.

          4 years ago
        • “Everyone else is doing it” doesn’t make it good or okay.

          4 years ago
        • You don’t get to define rap or hip-hop a certain way just because thats what you think is “good” or “okay”. Reality is the definition of what it IS, you might be thinking about what it USED to be. If you have a problem with the direction rap and hip-hop have taken that does not mean CL or Korean rappers are doing something wrong, that means everyone whose doing it this new way is wrong in YOUR OPINION. Such a hipster mentality to think the old way is good and new way is evil and corrupt because blah blah blah.

          The issue was whether CL being a Korean taking Latin and Black American and South American imagery and using it in her MV is okay. I think as long as it isn’t mean to mock or makes inauthentic claims, being inspired and using that imagery is fine, Beyonce can belly dance as can Selena Gomez even though they aren’t from the Middle East as long as they aren’t making cultural stereotypes that are offensive. This is what CL is inspired by and what she is going for as she is also catering to an international audience, if you feel she is claiming to be Black or Latin or making offensive statements I’d like for you to explain how exactly.

          4 years ago
        • It’s wrong in my opinion but right in yours.
          Both of us disagreeing. And this long comment really doesn’t change that.
          I never said she was claiming to be black or latin. Just that her entire image in this video rubs me the wrong way. Wrong as in wrong kind of way.

          4 years ago
        • A definition and reality are not really opinions
          unless you go by some philosophical sense of the terms
          I’m not talking about what my opinion of what rap and hip-hop are but the definitions and reality of what hip-hop and rap in fact are today.

          And the whole point of this was your argument that CL was not in keeping with what the original pioneers of hip-hop would do, I said that it doesn’t matter because hip-hop has changed, now your argument is “I just don’t like it”. Okay great, you have a feeling without an explanation of why, as in why it rubs you the wrong way if she isn’t being offensive or inauthentic.

          4 years ago
        • Because it’s shit. That opinion is my reality. Tell me how you are going to counter that now.

          4 years ago
        • Thats okay I don’t need to because you sound silly enough all on your own.

          4 years ago
      • I don’t know about you but I can’t recall ever seeing any rap/hip hop artists wearing bandanas over their faces though… at least not respectable artists. That whole scene in CL’s MV was very off-putting. It seemed more like they were trying to imitate actual gangs rather than rap culture/hip hop style. And there is absolutely nothing cool about trying to look like someone from MS-13 or the Latin Kings.

        4 years ago
        • The bandannas over the face is all about gang culture (it represented what gang you were from). I can’t recall any specific hip hop videos I’ve seen with that visual in them, but I know I’ve seen it before.

          4 years ago
        • This video instantly comes to mind. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVA-xTBeHyM

          4 years ago
        • Get that mess away from me right now, or so help me God… XD

          4 years ago
        • That’s the video right? c: I’m right right? eheheh

          4 years ago
        • They no look like gangsters, they look like idiots XD

          4 years ago
        • Which ones? Run This Town or Baddest Female?

          4 years ago
        • Both, but I think Run This World takes the cake. Perhaps I’m biased, but I just can’t with that song. I couldn’t when it was released and I can’t now XD

          4 years ago
        • Granted, they do look ridiculous but I feel as though CL and her clique were way more ridiculous looking. Laughably ridiculous imo.

          4 years ago
        • I think they’d look less ridiculous if they ditched the bandannas and gave G-Dragon some real pants. Not designer boy shorts >_>

          4 years ago
        • It all just screams try hard to me. (•__•; )

          4 years ago
        • It’s astronomical levels of try hard >_>

          4 years ago
  226. I’ve always thought, that YG slightly mistakes originality and freedom of their performers with applying American style all over… being independent from one reality made them dependent from the other one, that’s my view… Even though they still keep their funky, colorful, visual style (thank you GD, really), I find their music in majority falling towards American melodic schemes, when you compare it to others. This is only my personal view. I mean, there are some songs that caught me (Blue, I am the best, Fantastic Baby, Seungri’s Strong Baby…), but not that many, in comparison to other kpop performers. OK, stop now, because you’ll hate me, and I actually AGREE WITH YOU in terms of this song XD at least, partially.

    I think it is kinda boring… except from “na-nappeun gijibe” and “unni” parts, these are actually quite singable :] Personally I have very mixed feelings about CL. It’s easier to say what I like about her than what I don’t like. I love her smile, it’s so pretty!!! And I think she has a fantastic charisma on stage. Exceptional. Let’s end up here. This song, though… I would confuse it with every other American hip-hop song if I was to listen to it in some shopping mall, not paying attention to lyrics or language. YG made us expect something really huge and I wouldn’t call it like that. It was… kinda colorless. One of a kind, female version.

    I have totally no problem with your opinion on the song. But I know nothing about hip-hop culture, so I quite feel the idea of using the artform with the glamour, funky, unrealistic settings, it’s ok with me. I find it interesting and different from all this “real-life” hip hop. BUT it has to be nicely done. This was just… plain.

    Huu~ I would choose Bom, because even though I really REALLY dislike her voice, I find the song fantastic. So, yeah, I go for Bom.

    4 years ago
  227. I liked this KMM. It was hilarious.
    And you should have added that part in the bloopers about the bandana to the actual video!
    I tend to enjoy your negative reviews more than your positive ones for some reason lol

    4 years ago
  228. Soozee looks amazing with blonde hair, and it was a great color on her!

    4 years ago
  229. Simon didn’t talk about the cow bell?? What sorcery is this O.O

    4 years ago
  230. I think I very well understand Simon’s point. Appropriation of a culture should be done with more consideration than simply for an aesthetic borrowing. However, I think there is a little bit more to say for CL and YG’s defense. The song is about ‘defiance’ and standing up for her own sake as a girl. Especially as a female rapper, albeit one may argue against the validity of ‘rapper’ title within K-Pop, in a still-very-much-patriarchal country like Korea, CL is trying to encourage the empowerment of girls by portraying the bad, fierce, and powerful image. Actually, this message is also similarly pursued by Lee Hyori’s new song ‘Bad Girl.’ I would probably argue that this is not the best image to pursue within the Feminist context, but again, she is showing her power as a woman that will not waver even within this traditionally unacceptable image as ‘나쁜기집애’ (which is of an older-generation derogatory korean term that I would hear from my grandmother in those occasions I did not follow her old fashioned expectation of a good girl :P). So, I would say that CL and YG wanted to appropriate such a strong and parallel image of ‘going against the grain’ in order for CL to express herself and her strength, rather than the actual contextual and cultural borrowing of the rap culture itself.