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TL;DR – Living with Parents…FOREVER

April 17, 2014

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So, this week’s topic is on for how long people in Korea live with their parents. We tackled this subject in two ways:

We first talked about the real estate market in Korea, and how different it is than what we’re used to in North America. Namely, it’s a lot more expensive here, not just for rent, but also because the deposits that you have to put down here are exorbitantly expensive. As a graduate in Korea, if you’ve got student loans, there ain’t no way you’re moving out of the house, cuz you ain’t got that kinda money for a key deposit just lying around. Jobs in Korea don’t pay that well, either, so…how are you gonna move out?

The second part we talked about, though, is about dependence on parents. Being a parent in Korea is a HUGE financial burden, since you have to support your kids for a very long time. And if you’re living with your parents the desire to be independent isn’t really there, since – well – why would you if you could live there for free, right?

That last point is one I’m sure a lot of people are going to argue against. I’m sure there are many people out there that’ll say “Malarky! I wanted to move out and so did my friends!” So be it. From who we’ve spoken with, and who our friends that we consulted with on the matter have spoken with, this idea of “why would I move out if I got it good here?” is common.

Ok, enough summary: Soo Zee had some interesting stats and facts that she sent us that we were afraid to mention on camera, because if you get one pronoun out of order then it becomes an entirely different stat. Copying and pasting is so much easier!

We mentioned the term “Kangaroo Jo.” At first, the term Kangaroo was applied to people that didn’t want to get jobs, and just stay students for as long as possible and be dependent on their parents. Now, though, there’s a new breed of Kangaroos. Now, they’re people who, despite the fact that they are highly educated, and have have jobs and earn money, they don’t want to be financially independent from their parents. You don’t have to pay rent if you’re living with your parents! Also, a bit of clarification: the Kangaroo term isn’t really something you call someone, like you’d call someone a Freeloader. You Freeloader! You Kangaroo! It’s not like that. It’s more like a classification of people, like Millennials or something like that.

Some interesting stats Soo Zee sent us: 60% of University graduates in their 20s are ‘Kangaroos,’ while 38.7% of those have a full time job, and 32.9% of them have part time work, according to this site here. Also, interestingly, over the past decade or so there’s been a 91% increase of people in their 30s and 40s living with their parents, from this site

Ok, I’ll leave it at that. I don’t want this to get too proper or researchy, though I’m sure that’s a good thing – that’s just not what we do here that much at EYK. We’d like to get back to fart jokes, if possible :D

Let us know what the situation’s like where you’re from. I know for us the contrast in family dynamics between Korean families and our families was very surprising. What’s it like where you’re from? More Korean? More Western? Or something different? We’d love to read your thoughts on the matter. I’ve got my money on Sweden having things all figured out, for some reason. Must be all that cheap furniture!

Also, if you found this topic interesting, and like these TL;DRs of ours, make sure you click on this pretty button below right here so you can subscribe for more TL;DRs. It’s the financially responsible thing to do!

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TL;DR – Living with Parents…FOREVER

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  1. Even though I live in the United States, my parents are from Europe (Italy and Greece) and it is really common to live with your parents until you are married there. I have a friend in Italy who moved out when he was 18 and it was really rebellious of him and his family wasn’t happy. From what I noticed in Italy, many daughters become second mothers, helping out with all the chores. The sons, however, are perpetual mama’s boys, and get waited on every second. It is also common that a grandparent or two are also living with the family. I am out of college and I still live with my parents in Chicago, but it’s really starting to become more acceptable here. The only time other people will judge you negatively about this is if you are indeed a freeloader. I’ve heard of families charging their adult children rent, and my family cannot wrap their head around it maybe because of our European roots. I honestly love living with my parents but I know I would probably hate it if my home was similar to the size of Korean homes. We have 2 floors with 4 bedrooms and a basement that has a bedroom, kitchen and bathroom, so there is a lot of space. It’s kind of difficult to leave such a spacious and quiet environment when you know the only apartment you can land would be like the size of one bedroom for the entire apartment.

    2 years ago
  2. I loved the moment that Simon realized what he was about to say was going to bite him in the ass, but Martina called him on it anyway. Nice try, turning the camera off Simon…but we know…we know.

    2 years ago
  3. In Malta it is very common for children to stay with their parents untill they get married or are financially stable and can move out. Many 20 and 30 year olds who are getting married usually stay with the parents to save up so they can get their own place after the wedding.

    2 years ago
  4. It’s almost the same here in the Philippines. The people who just graduated college/uni doesn’t really get the pressure of having their own lives. Here in the Philippines it’s actually much favorable to your parents if you live under their roof. And the time that you’ll actually get to have your own life is when you get married and that’s the only time when you’ll have to live separately.

    About the financial division regarding the bills and everything. The parents are still the ones who pay them but if you want to chip in just a little it’s highly appreciated. Living here in the Philippines if you’re from abroad isn’t actually expensive but getting a high paying job is quite hard if you’re not educated well. For example if you’re a janitor in the US they pay you hourly but if you’re a janitor here in the Philippines they pay you the minimum wage per day which is somehow around $10.00. And in the Philippines it isn’t quite known having some part time jobs even if you’re just a minor.

    2 years ago
  5. I’m a twenty-something from Long Island and it is INCREDIBLY hard to find a place here. Depending on where you look, it can be either super cheap (in a bad neighborhood) or forget-about-it expensive. If you have a minimum wage job it can be hard to find a place, so I do know that a lot of people will live with their parents. I think what stinks is that a lot of people my age want to be able to move out (myself included), but can’t.

    2 years ago
  6. I think in the US it varies greatly. I moved away for a year after high school, then came back home to go to college, and got married at 21 and moved out permanently. My brother moved out when he went to grad school in a different state. My best friend is almost 40 and still lives with his parents, even though he has a full time job. I think most of the time, until they finish college, most people in the US consider their parents home their permanent home, even if they move for school or get an apartment with friends. When the economy changed, there was actually a trend of previously independent people moving back to their parent’s homes as they lost their jobs. I’m not sure if this has reversed as the economy improved or not.

    2 years ago
  7. In Sweden you usually try to get your own job as soon as possible and it’s a dream scenario to live in your own payed apartment, it’s status and class.
    Almost all kids have allowance though, And my dad gives me extra but expects me to pay rent when I can afford it (if i still live home) but as long as I’m a student he will continuously pay for me in reasonable amounts, or I should consider a part time job if I have an expensive lifestyle. Parents are generally very generous in Sweden.
    We move out as soon as we can, but often supported by our family but the goal here is to be independent and free!
    There is also schools that could help you with apartments and stuff. But you can’t have the best right away, You will work your way up ofcourse :)

    2 years ago
    • There are schools that can help you with apartments?? What? How’s that?

      2 years ago
      • In some places the school holds contracts with the nearby housing association or such like nearby apartments and when you start a term in that school they will offer you an apartment or will put you in a short waiting line for one. This doesn’t apply everywhere though and is somewhat rare depending on location and more!

        2 years ago
  8. in iceland we are all raised diffrently but the most people dont have much stress as being independent. Since the viking age the parents dont save up money for their children the spent it on them selves and the kids had earn their own money and it has held as a tradision here sort of. Since collage or universety isn’t that expencive we dont have to take lones. Since we dont struggle moving out of our parents place, its not ”lame” to still live with your parents in your late 20, but you are expected to move out atleast when you have children and you and your partner can aford to live on your own and the parents are not expected to pay for the wedding. Also i want to point out that every teenager is expectet to have a part-time job at the age of 16 and that includes to be working with school and then have summer jobs. So kids are saving up for years and then they can aford to move out at a young age.

    2 years ago
  9. I am currently a university student in Latvia. I do not live with my parents, but they are paying for my dorm and give me food money. Actually, I have a job interview tomorrow, and if I am lucky, I will be able to support myself fully from now on.

    2 years ago
  10. In Czech Republic is weird, if you are staying with your parents after getting job or getting married. Usually they support you if you are studying or you are jobless, but expect you do housewives jobs like cooking, cleaning etc. Some people like me, have part-time jobs during uni and paying parents some small amount for rent. Now I have from this month one year contract job, so I will pay them more for rent, but I wont move out, because I know, that job will end in year and after that I would need to move back, because I would have money for rent. But people sometimes ask me, why didnt I moved and I aswer that there is no need for now, because living alone in flat is lonely and I have more like tenant relationship with my parent, than parent-child relationship.

    2 years ago
  11. Personally I feel really pressured about the need of getting a job and saving up money. Not so much to where I have to move out of my parents house, but just to do something with my life… it makes it really hard because I have a lot of social anxieties and I really dont know how to get over it, and on top of that I feel that everybody has tons of expectations of me. If its not people in my family, then its people at church, or people I dont really know well. Then they tend to be quick to judge my situation without really knowing..

    2 years ago
  12. for those of you from countries where it’s common to stay with your parents until you’re married, is there any stigma for those people who are older and still unmarried (ie. in 30s+)? is there any time where unmarried ‘children’ decided that they should move out because they’re “too old”? or is that not really a problem?

    2 years ago
    • in my country Singapore, there used to be this stigma. but in recent years, people who are in their 40s who still live with their parents arent looked down upon anymore, mainly because the cost of living has gone so high, marriage has become almost impossible unless you have a very lucrative pay.

      single people who still lives with their parents are being seen as people who takes care of their parents. there have been cases where the married sibling moved out and stops supporting the aging parent, where as the single sibling still does.

      2 years ago
    • i think when they are ‘too old’ their parents are old too. so they probably won’t move out anymore because they need to take care of the ‘old folks’. I think there might still be some sort of stigma if u r 40 but had never live on your own but people probably won’t ask you straight in the face. They might gossip about you behind your back tho.

      2 years ago
  13. Im Mexican American and I grew up in the States in a traditional Mexican house hold. From my own experiences living in both Mexico and the States, children are not allowed to be free loaders. Once someone marries, they are expected to move out of the house and start their own life somewhere else. Even after you move out, you are expected to help your parents, if you can of course. They will prob not be helped much by their parents, since the parents might still have children to provide for.

    While still living with the parents, it is expected to help out whenever you start working. For example, I’m 20 right now and my father just underwent surgery. Since I’m the oldest, I have completely taken over as the head of the family and I am now working to provide for my family of 4: mom, dad, little bro, and me.

    I dont know if this still holds true for modern families in Mexico or not. I’m just talking this from my perspective and how I was raised. Hearing from the freeloading really shocked me though.

    2 years ago
    • I’m also Mexican American and I am also 20 years old. I go to university and though my parents don’t outright say it, they hope I do something with my life after I graduate (meaning they want me to move out). I’m having a hard time at school, but I have a brother who has autism and so I do try to help them with whatever I can. But sometimes I just don’t do the chores, it’s not because I don’t want to help, I just am barely trying to live my life. My dad tells me that if I don’t like living the way I do then I should just move out. But that’s not so easy when I have loans to pay for. I’m not sure how I’m going to get a job. I am even at risk of getting my financial aid taken away. And the worst part is that I don’t even know how I want to live my life, but at this point I’m just trying to get by. My ultimate goal is to get my license, a decent job and maybe even my own apartment. But I still want to live with my parents and siblings. I don’t feel comfortable living with anyone else except for a cousin of mine who is the same age as me. And I can’t live alone :( I don’t like being alone for too long I like company.

      2 years ago
      • I know that feeling of not wanting to live alone >.< My father always tells me that I will always be welcomed to live at home for as long as I would like, as long as I am single. However, they still expect me to get a job once im older and help them out with bills and stuff. Right now though we are in a pickle and im trying to provided for the whole family while my dad is sick which is hard for a person who is 20.

        I wish you all the best! Fighting!! ^^

        2 years ago
        • Its really cool that you are helping out your family- fighting!

          2 years ago
  14. sj

    I’d like to mention one thing on this video that wasn’t clarified very well (I am korean). Usually people pay a HUGE sum of money beforehand and they BASICALLY //OWN// the place while they’re living in it. They don’t pay rent, then just own the house and when they move out, they get that huge sum of money back. That’s how housing USUALLY works in korea. Yes, there’s rent, and STRAIGHT UP rent like in North America which is much more common now than before, AND There IS the option to pay a SMALLER HUGE SUM and pay SMALLER RENT to lessen the burden and then get that huge sum BACK when you move out, but most of the time it’s a straight up rent or no rent at all :)

    2 years ago
    • Yeah, that’s one kind of rent, but supposedly it’s becoming not popular lately. Instead of paying, say, $20,000 key deposit plus monthly rent, some people pay $300,000 and no monthly rent.

      But supposedly landlords don’t want this any more, because the interest rates at the banks are sucking, and the interest they accrue is a lot smaller than it would be in just getting flat out non-refundable rent, right?

      2 years ago
      • I can confirm this. 800K+ apartment, people are offering upwards of 250K for the key money, but the banks’ decreasing interest rates isn’t sufficient to pay for the depreciation, taxation, etc.. It’s getting bad enough that most property owners with close to 1 million USD apartments are happy even with $400/month rental cash as they’re not overtly interested in the key money, no matter how large.

        2 years ago
      • Yea, I always wondered why there was jeonse. They say it’s to use the money to invest elsewhere but they could just get a mortgage, and let the weolse pay the bank interest, right?

        2 years ago
      • sj

        Ah I see what you mean! Yes, I agree! Though I feel like saying only one part of the payment system while the other two are still very much common (though not as much as in the past), would maybe give people a sense of false understanding- that was my only main concern :) Thank you for your reply, though!

        2 years ago
        • No problem. Thank you for not being angry at us as well! Some people get very upset when we don’t paint the full picture, which we know we can’t do. Thank you for being so respectful in your comments :D

          I know we have to skip out on some points in our videos, because otherwise our videos would be 30 minutes long each. We also skipped out on talking about how kids take care of their parents when they’re older, which is another expense. But both ideas would have made for a lot longer video, when we were trying to get just a rough idea out there :D

          2 years ago
        • Sorry this is out of nowhere, but does South Korea have nursing homes for the elderly?

          2 years ago
        • Yes, but in Korea, it’s a huge stigma for children who put their parents in nursing homes.
          It’s considered disrespectful for those who took care of you for years.

          2 years ago
        • sj

          We understand you guys are trying your best so I would like to thank you as well for showing the world about Korean culture :)

          That’s very understandable! It would be a handful to talk about one aspect without branching out too far and getting out of hand D: At the same time I feel like condensation of information should be done carefully since many people would think that the short, rough idea is ALL that there is to it, which we both know isn’t :)
          Thank you again! <3

          2 years ago
    • omg that’s so confusing! So you are saying that you can buy your own place but you have to pay the entire amount? No mortgage??

      2 years ago
      • No, you don’t have to pay the full amount. Just about 30%. Search Jeonse to learn more about the system.

        2 years ago
      • sj

        I guess the word “borrowing” might be more applicable? But yes no monthy fees for the home :)

        2 years ago
  15. I live in a small European country. Here it’s very common for people to live with their parents until they’re about 30. Most of them do that because they’re unemployed and rely on their parents financially. But I know several people with successful jobs who still live with their parents and spend their money on themselves.
    On the other hand, usually parents are NOT expected to pay for a wedding, apartment or anything for their children.

    2 years ago
    • PS: This happens because it’s almost impossible to find a job in this country. People with prestigious university degrees can’t even find a crappy job. Even a part-time job is difficult to get. You’re forced to depend on your parents and feel useless.

      2 years ago
  16. I’m from Costa Rica, here is super normal to see people staying with their parents until marriage or until they decide to live alone, however once the person has left the stage of education and they get a job they usually start helping their parents with their money. Also because it’s a small country, students don’t have need to move out, since it usually takes around an hour to get to universities (Mostly reside in the capital) so you don’t see a lot of dormitories and such. But like everything, I have seen some extreme cases of people in their 30’s still living completely of their parents.

    2 years ago
  17. In England it’s common for people to move out and be independent from 18 onwards as that’s when you tend to go to Uni and thus when you move into Uni accommodation! Though this kind of varies depending on potential gap years etc or whether you even go to Uni as you may very well go straight into work – I’d wager the latest somebody is still living with their parents is around 21/22. After that most people will be expecting you to be preparing to move out if you haven’t already done so and if you’re happily living at home during that time people tend to see you as too dependent on your parents and without any drive or independence. It’s pretty common to get a job and leave home as soon as your break after compulsory school is done with though of course it depends on the person, how much money you’re earning and what your parents are like. I know someone who doesn’t want to go to a distant Uni all because of her mum’s influence – there are very little people here who agree that a parents influence should dictate a person’s life and so my friend is caught in the middle. But basically, in England, we have Uni fees that are really never paid off – you get 30 years to pay it off and you only begin paying it off if you earn over £21,000. If you never earn that much you don’t have to pay it back and once the 30 years is up the slate it wiped clean. People don’t really see it as a debt. Personally, I’m taking a gap year before I go to Uni and so will go to Uni at 19 instead of 18. :) Then I’m free baby!

    2 years ago
  18. I also feel the pressure to be independent, but that’s the norm here in North America. My mom doesn’t apply it, my stepdad does. Why? I live in their second house and don’t pay much rent. It makes him crazy but the job market is terrible so there’s not much I can do. Interestingly enough, my mom knows that I will be leaving the area (probably even the country) when I finish my degree and she’s said she’d strongly consider moving as well.

    2 years ago
  19. Where I’m from in the US (Wisconsin~) there is definitely a strong feeling like you have to start being independent right after you graduate high school. Even before I graduated high school, there was a lot of pressure to get a part time job. So you get a part time job and then you go to college (there’s a stigma against those who choose to wait before going to college, like they are going to become deadbeats or something) and again there’s a lot of pressure to be independent. I wouldn’t necessarily say it’s looked down upon if you live with your parents for the first two years, but once you reach your third year in college I feel like there is a stigma against people who still live with their parents. If you don’t have your own place, it makes you seem…I don’t know…lame? or like a baby who still needs their parents :l I’m only a sophomore and I already live in an apartment near campus. It’s just kind of expected and because of how big North America is (things are really spread out) you really can’t be as involved in campus life if you live with your parents. As far as real estate goes, it’s really easy to find cheap (however crappy) places to live near campus because real estate companies will just buy whole blocks of houses to rent out to people and, if you have roommates, rent isn’t too bad (I pay about $270 a month for just rent, but I’ve seen cheaper). Anyway, this was a super long comment! D: My badddd

    2 years ago
    • damn $270 a month sounds really cheap, in australia Sydney you`ll pay about $150, $200 $300 a week for just a room if you are sharing an apartment, and units (apartments) inner city 1 or 2 bedroom can be around $400 to $700 a week depending, even more.

      2 years ago
    • OMGee you people have it cheap. I’m a student in Cali. Apartments while campus, while clean and have great amenities, are small and rent usually starts at $1200 a month. I have lots of friends who have up to 3 roommates to help cut down with the expenses. It works though because it seems like the 2 bedroom apartments are all built so they can house a total of 4 people. If was able to find a room for rent, much less an apartment for $270 a month, it would probably be in downtown LA and I would be fending off roaches the size of some k-pop group members. #nobueno

      2 years ago
      • In central London, the average rent students pay for a room in a shared flat/house with housemates is about £150 in basic accomodation. PER WEEK!!! That’s about over $200!!!
        As it’s so expensive, there has been a growing trend of university graduates coming home to live after uni, with the expectation to pay rent to parents (although less than you would have to pay if you moved out). People generally do that until they have enough to move out, there is a stigma attached to living with your parents for too long.

        2 years ago
        • My sis has a home in London so I know how crazy expensive things are there.

          2 years ago
      • “rent usually starts at $1200 a month.” that’s fucking crazy!

        2 years ago
      • Seriously!!! My family used to joke around that in Cali even if you made 60k a year you couldn’t afford a cardboard box under the freeway b/c even two bedroom condos were going for up to half a million the closer you got to Orange county and L.A. or San Diego. I lived with my mom til I was 26. I started working first then decided to go to College. My parents didn’t really care as long as i wasn’t being lazy around the house and was moving forward in my life. I knew lots of people who lived at home at that age. In So. Cali it just wasn’t really an option unless you wanted student loan debt you would be paying off til you were 80. So it was work and go to school a little at a time til your done. My family at least seems like a happy medium between live with me forever, and get out the second you turn 18. They wanted us there but they wanted us to be building our future, and we knew it wasn’t going to be forever, but I think they wanted us to have a good life with as little student loan debt and as much education as possible. My family was pretty poor and couldn’t afford to pay for my schooling so living with them was one way to help manage costs.

        2 years ago
        • Wow, you guys have it rough :l I guess the Midwest is cheaper than living on the east coast haha

          2 years ago
    • ...

      I’m from the Midwest, too, and I’d say it really depends if you go to a state school and live nearby or if you go to a school somewhat far away, especially one that’s private and has a wealthier student (via parents) base.

      At my private school, about 1/3-1/2 of students don’t work at all and our parents pay for everything, particularly an apartment. One of my friends is “taking out a loan” from her parents for tuition but they’re covering rent with no expectation of being paid back. Some of the people who live off campus are paying for it from loans and a part time job. But, since we have to live on campus for two years, it doesn’t feel weird to have parents paying for the other two. A lot of people live on campus all four years, anyway, where it’s included with the tuition in the online system.

      My parents give me an allowance for necessary items and then I pay for things like Netflix and a new phone with my funds from summer jobs. I’m moving off campus next year and my parents will be paying for that, too. Granted, nearly all of my private school tuition is covered by my merit scholarship, so rent and living expenses would be comparable to them paying my state school tuition. Rent is steeper here because campus is between downtown and a couple of hospitals…it’s about $900 with utilities for my small, but private apartment a 15 minute walk away from the buildings I have class in. If you want to drive to class every day, then you can get down to $300/month with roommates.

      Anyway, I wouldn’t say there’s a huge stigma against being on your parents dime here. Our average parental income is in the top 10% of national family incomes so that’s probably a big part of it…

      But, at the state school where most of my friends from high school go, all of them had moved off campus into their own apartments by the 3rd year, though most had been on campus previously instead of at home.

      2 years ago
      • So I guess it has a lot to do with where you’re from, backgrounds, what school you attend, specific situations, etc. I think that’s really interesting because where I am, even though we’re both in the Midwest, there would be a bad stigma that came with having your parents help you pay for everything, even though it’s completely normal there. To you, the way things are around here might seem unnecessarily difficult haha

        2 years ago
    • Same way where I’m from in Iowa

      2 years ago
  20. Hi guys! I seriously think you should have talked about how people are expected to pay for their elderly parents. Because I feel it’s linked, right? I mean I paid for you until you were 30, now that I’m 70, you need to pay for me. It’s also linked with the lack of social welfare but please don’t quote me on anything, I don’t know much about Korea, ok? ^.^

    2 years ago
    • We did start talking about it a bit, but it’s a big issue to discuss, I think, and we didn’t really want to do it injustice. All I know is that we were talking about how difficult it must be to be 50 years old in Korea, paying for your kids AND paying for your parents as well.

      2 years ago
      • OMG I didn’t think that situation could happen!! It seems like hell! Also, do you think all those cost is driving the birth rate down?

        2 years ago
        • That could be it. There could also be something similar to what’s happening in Japan: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/oct/20/young-people-japan-stopped-having-sex

          2 years ago
        • Thanks for answering me, but I admit I’m very surprised by your answer o.O that article is so depressing. :( Extremely interesting but still sad. Still, l I’m glad the gov. is at least trying to do something, even if it seems to be too little. The idea of a nation dying is so sad to me. The problem seems so big though… I wonder if the gov. is really the key to solve this problem…

          2 years ago
  21. I haven’t seen the video yet but I thought I’d share what I know. I’m Indian and I live in the UK and since it is a Western country, many people move away for university because they want to get away from their parents and there seems to be a stigma attached to living at home. I’m only 18 so I can’t talk much but I think the moving out stage has been delayed until after university now because of the economy. A lot of my friends are applying to local universities because despite student loans, it would be too expensive to move out and go to another city, which is why I think a lot of them will stay at home until they have a job and can financially support themselves. Now, since India is a very family orientated society, it’s a different matter.

    What usually happens (now keep in mind that things are changing and it isn’t the case everywhere) is that you live with your parents. If you are a girl this is until you are married, at which point you go to live with your husband and his parents, and if you are a boy you stay with your parents and once you are married your wife comes to live with all of you. Now obviously people might move away for university and for work and it is a lot more common now than it used to be, but traditionally this is what happened and everyone used to live in joint families. Personally, if it is possible I would also stay at home until I got married , because they are my parents and there really isn’t any point in moving away, and then having to move somewhere else again when I get married.

    One thing I never understood though is why the Western world seems to be so against living at home. They’re your parents, they brought you into this world and looked after you, why is it so bad to still live with them? As long as you don’t spend your whole life dependent on them and actually have a job and contribute towards the household expenses, I honestly don’t see the problem. Is this a view that only I have or do other people feel the same way?

    *goes to watch the video now*

    2 years ago
    • Yeah, I think it’s because of parents like mine…or rather my one parent. My mother is a control freak and I hated living with her. I didn’t have anywhere to go so I lived with her until I was 25 years old, then I moved with my aunt for 3 years before I finally got my own apartment. I love in Central California so everything is expensive and even when you have a job things are still expensive.

      2 years ago
    • I think ti is just more about culture and family structure. Here in the US the typical family structure is nuclear, its typically just parents and kids. When parents get old they go to a nursing home, when kids grow up they move out on their own. Where as other cultures, the Mexican culture, your Indian culture and Asian cultures and perhaps others are more about multi-generational living. Where you expect and see great grandparents, parents, kids and spouses and grand kids all under one roof or in one area more like communal living. i think its just a culture thing and people tend to not be able to get out of their own bias, of their own culture to see another culture as being equally acceptable although different. I kind of like the idea of living with lots of family. I love my family and want to be near them, but at the same time am kinda weirded out by the thought of having others so close to me that they are all up in my business if you know what I mean. I like my privacy too. So to me a happy medium would be living nearby but not in the same house so we can have privacy but also develop that family bond and be near one another.

      2 years ago
    • I think being independent is such a big deal in western countries because it also has something to do with being a financial burden to them (at least where i come from it feels a bit like that)!
      Housing and food etc are usually rather expensive in Europe and your parents had to support you your hole live. Now you’re old enough to have a job and to be able to take care of yourself, so you should move out. I would feel ashamed if would depend on my parents now that I’m in university. They spent so much time, love and money on bringing me up and making sure I would be able to find a good job and have a nice life, I just feel like I should stop being a burden to them. I love my parents and living at home is nice of course, but I think they deserve to keep their money and save it for later, when they’re retired or just spend it on themselves for once!
      (though it’s always nice if they help you out with some from time to time, makes life a bit easier!)

      Also I want to be independent and live my own life of course ;)

      2 years ago
    • I don’t think there’s anything wrong with living with your family unless you’re just completely mooching off of them, but I’m American and individuality/independence is a large part of our national identity (sometimes detrimentally so.) It’s generally expected that young people move away from home either when they start university or when they graduate. If you’re still living with your family after that time, many people see it as a sign that you’re lazy and have no ambition, are taking advantage of your parents, or are irresponsible/incapable of taking care of yourself.

      I feel like this view is more common among older generations who blame “millenials” for living at home without taking into account the state of the economy or job market. Most students in the United States graduate with tens of thousands of dollars of debt from student loans and are either not able to get jobs or have to settle for very low-paying jobs just to pay off their loan interest.

      TL;DR: there’s a fairly common viewpoint here that your parents shouldn’t have to be financially responsible for you after you turn 18, but a lot of people don’t have a choice.

      2 years ago
  22. Here in Mexico I’d say it is totally acceptable to live with your parents until you get married. There’s really no social pressure to leave home before that.
    There are a lot of universities around the country so many students still live with their parents while studying and don’t really have to move out.

    2 years ago
  23. Finland is pretty much the opposite. Here we move out as soon as possible. And it’s normally because of your education. Because university is free in Finland, it’s easier to move out since you don’t have to pay fees. And also the government helps students by giving them student allowances. Without my student allowances, I wouldn’t be able to pay my rent. I’m 20 years old and all my friends are living on their own by now. Some of my friends even moved out when they started high school at age 15-16 (but that was mostly because the high school was in a different city or something like that). It would be weird here in Finland to meet a person who is 25 or older and still living with their parents. And we don’t take care of our parents when they’ll grow old. Here it is seen as the goverment’s job. But of course that isn’t always the case. And you still meet people who are 25 and still living with their parents (but that is seen as a weird thing)

    2 years ago
    • in my country it’s around 1500 euros but I also get student allowance wich pays for both uni and transportation. Going to college in america kind of sounds like a nightmare with all that debt

      2 years ago
    • But you realize the student loan bubble is eventually going to collapse like the housing bubble did in America. And it’s not “free” if you’re paying for it in taxes.

      2 years ago
    • Where the government gets all those money to pay for people? Wow, now I am jelly!

      2 years ago
    • Norway is very much the same as well. Young people often move from home because of school at 15-16 (free school, government allowance/possibility for a low-interest loan), and a lot of people stay moved out. But it’s also very acceptable to move back home between finishing school and building up the funds with a job (a lot of them would rather not though. Seems to be a pride thing lol). But the closer to 30 you get, the more pressure you get about moving out again :P
      I think it’s also quite common to not move very far away from the parents, although of course there’s exceptions.

      2 years ago
    • it’s the samne over in Sweden but then we are after all neighbour countires, I’m a 19, turning 20 year old student who lives on my own and also lives of my “student allowance”, but then not to be forgotten in Sweden we have to repay all the money we get during our years of studying, so as soon I finish my studies and get a job I will have to start pay back all the money I borrowed, but living with your parents after you graduate is a weird thing to do in Sweden.

      2 years ago
      • in australia the government pays for accredited courses, including all university, you just pay for the books, which are usually around $80-$200 each. You get student discounts for transport and other entertainment things during uni, but its nothing to shout about, you pay back the university fees after you start working earning over $40K at 2% of your wage with no interest. It`s called fee-help, you also get a student allowance.

        some private colleges now have government accredited programs, some don`t, they can cost you up to $15,000 a year.

        International students really fund a big chunk of university budgets these days, especially from China at the moment. They pay huge fees to attend Australian universities. If it wasn`t for them our universities would severely lack funding as the government has cut back on education budgets.

        2 years ago
    • Sounds like Denmark and Finland are pretty similar :) the age-groups you talked about are just about the same here, when it comes to when people tend to move out. I think it must be common for places with free education and student allowances, that people find their own place at an early age.

      2 years ago
    • I’m almost 18 and still in high school but my parents and friends are all asking questions like do I know where I am going to move or if I already have a place and stuff. My sister was living at home when she was like 20 or so and everybody were going crazy over the fact that she was still living home. Aika perus:D

      2 years ago
    • I wish I went school in Finland. My life would have been so much easier. :)

      2 years ago
      • Read the comment above. A Scandinavian said it’s not as nice since
        the government’s student allowance is not enough to pay off for everything in big cities.

        2 years ago
        • Just a quick note here. Finland is not part of Scandinavia. Scandinavia includes countries with similar languages ( Germanic ) in a specific area of Northern Europe – Norway, Sweden, and Denmark. Finnish is not linguistically similar to its surrounding countries’ languages ( Sweden, Denmark, etc ), it is Uralic not Germanic. Finland is a Nordic country instead, which includes the Scandinavian countries plus Iceland, Greenland, Åland, and the Faroe Islands.

          2 years ago
        • it’s not?????
          oh thank you America, for giving young students bad definitions…
          like the usage of “Asian”

          2 years ago
        • Asian is appropriate though, for every country within the continent of Asia. Even referring to someone from India as Asian is okay, even though you “should” call them Indian. It’s just more common to call them by their country’s name instead of the general term. Cool fact: Russians are both Asian and European. The problem you’re probably thinking of is when people used to call Asians “Orientals”, which is somewhat degrading depending on the context and the person you say it to.

          2 years ago
        • I never thought that, oriental to me is a lovely way of describing asians, im half asian, but again as you say it does depend on the person saying it.

          2 years ago
        • Oriental used to be used in a more disparaging way, I don’t see it as such personally though. I don’t think it’s such an issue now as it used to be, but I’m sure it can still be offensive to some.

          2 years ago
        • it`s always good to know the history, thanks for pointing this out,,

          2 years ago
        • it is appropriate, but I don’t like how it’s only targeted for ONLY east Asians.
          Instead of calling people like me just Asian, they should refer to me as EAST Asian.
          Because the current definition used in North America is pretty much screwed up.
          Heck, I never understood why they call the obviously Asian people, South East Asians,
          by their origin (Vietnamese, Filipino, Thai) while us Koreans, Chinese, Japanese were just “Asian.”

          2 years ago
        • I think a lot of people just say america, and then referring to Latin American countries as “South America”. For me its just casual speech or laziness. I don`t have the tendency or hear anyone else say “North America” unless its a formal speech and comparing regions for discussion.

          That may be whats happening with Asia and S/E asia, even then people I hear only say south east asia when they want you to realize they went through the southern Asian countries like Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia Laos etc, at least from my experience here in Oz.

          2 years ago
        • I don’t know either, though I generally call people by their country’s name. Imagine how us white people feel being called “white” ( or Caucasian ) no matter where we’re from.
          “You’re Asian?” “I’m Japanese.” “Oh okay, Japanese then.”
          “You’re Caucasian?” “I’m American, with Finnish and British blood.” “Oh, so you’re white.”

          Not saying it’s not important, but it does get bothersome. I know how you feel.

          2 years ago
        • Oooo, that’s interesting. Cool beans. :)

          2 years ago
    • Yup. I’m a woman, soon 22 years old and living at home. There are people who think I must have some kind of problems cause I “still” live home. I work and go to school. Truth is, I really like living home. It’s free and I love my family. Why would I move out?

      2 years ago
      • Haha, I know, right? I live at home too, and I have the exact sentiments :P No rent, low food costs, caring family~
        But as I’m turning 26 later this year, I’m starting to get pressured to move out, haha (and at the same time it would be nice to live alone and freely too. Too bad it’s not free!)

        2 years ago
      • :D hey love ur name! Me too, I’m 23, currently living with my family, have a part time job, and I try to contribute some of the house and food expenses. I’ve had people asking me if I was living alone and, sadly, they give me this “look”. XD I love my family and I feel really happy and comfortable when I can see my family being all together and healthy. Also, my brother has autism and it’s really hard for me to just leave the family. I really really love my family and I want to help them any way I can.
        Mum gave me her credit card but I only use it when my parents say they need to buy things (mainly grocery shopping). I don’t ever use the credit card for my personal use because that just feels plain wrong, so yeah i just can’t understand why other people use their parents’ money to just blindly buy whatever the S*** they want. Okay my post is really long, imma shush now :p

        2 years ago
        • I am the same, I actually do a lot of the shopping and cooking for my big family, so it’s not so much “failure to launch” as “convenient system”–my mom can travel for her business and not worry about what everyone’s eating, and I can keep trying to become a professional writer and take care of most of my needs with a part-time job.
          I’m 28. X) I had a bit of a crisis about this, but then decided cultural norms are for the birds anyway.

          2 years ago
        • Ah! People… in my boat! Also 28 here.

          Well, being Mexican there is the cultural norm of women living with their parents until they marry. Parents see kids as their future insurance. I have no problems with this: my parents raised me and took care of me and now it’s my turn to take care of them.

          A couple of years ago Dad had 2 strokes which were a precursor to his failing kidney disease. Now he’s on dialysis 3 days a week.
          Me and my sister live with them and contribute to the household expenses and in turn we live rent-free.
          I do a lot of driving for them (especially at night because Dad is blind in one eye and Mom has trouble seeing in the dark, especially with all the headlights), cooking, shopping, etc.

          It’s just much much easier to work a part time job and pay for my own expenses (school loans, credit card bills etc) and then have time to spend with family and friends and doing crafty stuff.

          2 years ago
        • It’s wonderful that you’re so caring about your brother :)

          2 years ago
    • same goes for Denmark

      2 years ago
    • Man Finland sounds like paradise compared to the amount of student debt chained to my ankles from the United States lol. *Daydreams about Finland*

      2 years ago
      • I know right…even with scholarships, they could barely cover anything…college in the US is so ridiculously expensive

        2 years ago
      • It’s pretty much the same here in sweden, but it’s not as wonderful as is sounds. You’re under a lot of pressure to move out as soon as possible and those student’s allowances aren’t that big. I’m only 17 and still in school, but I’m looking for a part-time job so I can get my own apartment. Biggest problem is there isn’t a lot of jobs for young people that hasn’t finished school yet… *sigh*

        2 years ago
        • As a 22 year old resident of Sweden who still lives with her parents, I actually…agree. ._. There is a lot of pressure to move out. Like OP said it’s much, much easier to move out here than in America or Korea, but it’s still sometimes difficult. Thankfully, my parents are in the minority and actually encouraged me to stay at home. Partially because I’ve been a little late in the whole independence department…^^;; But they want me to leave only when I’m ready. But a friend of mine has lovely parents, you know no reason to gtfo but she left just two weeks after she turned 18. The allowance Satu said is so true! I’m almost done with college and thankfully that allowance has given a huge cushion to fall back on for my parents. They actually refuse to allow me to pay their rent since they think it’s their responsibility, so instead I just give them a bunch of the money I get. I use the rest to pay for food and entertainment. I’ve been very blessed with being able to live at home while going to school. I also learned very quickly to NOT take out any loans. I mean, school is free. Completely free. And I live with my parents so there’s no need.

          In my defense, most of my friends live very close to their parents. c; I know a boy who literally lives just down the road from his parents and cousins. People like to be independent but also highly value being with their families here.

          However, once school is done with I really want to move out ASAP. None of my friends still live with their parents and I feel like a burden. Us Swedes are really independent and I’m going against stereotype. xD Oh well, it can’t be helped.

          Ahh, by the way Simon and Martina!! Some of the comments being left on the video are really disgusting. I understand how infuriating the story of the lady who mooches off her parents and won’t even pay for anything but there are very inappropriate and abusive comments being made. Maybe I’m sensitive but a few really offended me, talking about abusing their children over that…So terrible..

          2 years ago
        • It´s very smart of you to live at home while studying at the university(I guess it´s the university since you´re 22?). I know lots of people that actually manage to live on their own and survive on just the allowance from the government (I don´t know how, maybe they eat air?). For me, the allowance doesn´t even cover my rent, so I have to take a loan aswell (gahh…anxiety..). I also know a few that does the same thing as you, to avoid the loans they live at home while studying. I myself wanted to reeeeeeeeeeally move out when I was maybe 18, but couldn´t afford it since it was freaking impossible to find a job. So i moved out when I was 21 or so, what a huuuuge relief. It all depend on the family situation, but I think my parents wanted me out of the house. We have a close relationship, but I actually think they got a bit tired of me there in the end ^^

          2 years ago
        • Wow, you guys are fast. I’m 19 and I can’t even imagine myself living on my own in the near future. But I guess it also depends on the situation ’cause I do have a loooot of friends who live in apartments but most of them it’s beacuse they’re not originally from here. It’s actually quite common, as we’re in the city and our school is very well recommended. As for myself, I don’t think i’ll be moving out anytime soon as my schedule and school chores take basically all my time and energy :/

          2 years ago
        • It’s accurate what ssecrecy said about Finland, but I’d like to add that it depends on the city if you can survive only with the government’s student allowance. The allowance is enough to pay your rent, electricity and food if you live in a SMALL city, but like myself who is moving to the capital with the ridiculous rents, I possibly can’t survive only with that allowance so I have to take out a study loan. Some parents help their children, but as for me, I haven’t given any pocket money since I was 10yo. And like blacknightingale said, it’s the same in Finland, for a student with no profession, it’s difficult to get a job…

          2 years ago
        • How much is the tax rate in Finland, though? I’ve heard it’s very high but figured I’d ask an actual citizen of FInland :)

          2 years ago
        • The overall tax rate was 45,6 last year (for comparison I think the US had 14-15 and Denmark 48)

          2 years ago
        • Who cares? look at all the stuff they get for it. lol

          2 years ago
  24. In Philippines, personally, I am 22 and I am still living in my parents’ house. I have a job but it’s not enough for me to leave my parent’s house or move somewhere. There’s no stigma here like the one in North America. And people who have part-time jobs are usually looked up to because they can work and study at the same time. Also, parents usually give money or allowances to their children to support their studies but I’ve never heard parents giving their credit cards to their children nor have i touched my parent’s credit card. Do they have credit card? i’m not even sure.
    Some of people still live with their parents even after they are married or have children. This kind of behavior is not really condemned in our society especially if your financially challenged. But it’s usually preferred for you to have your own home if you are already married. And usually, the youngest child stays with their parents even after they are married because they have like somewhat a “responsibility” to take care of their parents even they are married already.
    Philippine culture have strong family ties that some even have their own small compound where families and relatives live together closely.

    2 years ago
  25. So in regards to the culture context I am native and its sort of expected that I live with my family or around my family. Even though I am now moved out I will eventually have to move back home and live with and support my parents or have them move in with me. I also do have a credit card connected to there account by I only get to use that when I go on trips and I am expected to pay everthing back so as long as you pay it back I think it is OK. But I also don’t think I would have moved out if I had to make a 10000 dollar deposit I pay about 500 a month and on 70 dollars in bills with a room mate and our deposit was only first months rent.

    2 years ago
  26. I totally feel that pressure to move out and become independent! It’s just that it’s becoming more and more difficult to do so. Like previously stated the economy isn’t doing so good and people are actually moving back with their parents. It also depends on where you live and how expensive it it. My family comes from Mexico and they have a more family oriented mind. Many of my cousins in Mexico still live with their parents but that might also be because it’s too expensive to move out. It wouldn’t be that weird for me as a woman to stay in my parents home until I get married. Also many people do move out because they want to do whatever they want and not hear the my house my rules speech a billon times. I am expected to follow rules and to contribute by cleaning. I was never given free reign with my parents credit card! Hell I wasn’t even given an allowance! Actually it would be embarrassing and shameful to use my parents money. I will eventually move out just not sure when.

    2 years ago
  27. In the UK(Scotland) most young people do still live with their parents. However (like myself) most young people have a part-time job and help towards the running of the household (perhaps it’s just me) as well as using their money for buying extras or going out. Myslef in particular i would say i live with my parents yes, but i feel more like i am a tenant rather than their child free-loading off them. I pay rent, do my own laundry, i cook for the family, i do the grocery shops etc. I think in the UK there is a mentality of both (North America/Korea) , and since we are so multicultural some families of other ethnicities and religions have other arrangements.

    2 years ago
  28. this is a very interesting tldr. you wouldn’t imagine that something like this would be different in cultures. it’s just something obscure that you don’t really think about. o when this popped up i thought “how are they going to make this a tldr?” but they did, and it was fabulous XD

    2 years ago
    • Thank you! I’m glad you found it interesting. I was a bit skeptical myself until we started looking into it more, and we were really intrigued.

      2 years ago
  29. To be honest, I have no idea what it’s like here in Germany, I just know that both of my parents moved out quite early(they where 18/19 and 20/21, I think. At least it was somewhere around there xD) since they got married and had me and stuff. They told me I could stay with them for as long as I want, or at least until I finish University and get married or something idk.
    Though the thing is, I don’t want to stay with them for too long since I’ll feel like I’m being a burden and I like being independent. I still have a couple years to go though, so we’ll see how things turn out^^

    2 years ago
  30. Love that bun, Martina!

    2 years ago
  31. A poem:
    Dad wants me out
    Mum wants me to stay
    I don’t have money
    So life is going Mama’s way

    2 years ago
  32. I’ve been trying to wrap my head around this since I came to Korea but I still haven’t been able to. But more about their mentality about living with their family. In America even though alot of college students are moving back in with their parents they still live separate lives (such as paying a small amount of rent, or living with a roommate mentality). But in Korea it seems like they still live with a parent child mentality even after they are adults. And some koreans I’ve met don’t have that independent feeling at all, growing up in America this literally blows my mind. I’ve tried putting myself in their shoes but it just doesn’t seem logical to me. Even if they live with their parents because of the high key money deposits (which is fine, totally understand) some just don’t have the drive to get out of that situation. Maybe they just don’t express that drive, I’m not sure.

    2 years ago
    • I think it surprises you that asians don’t have the drive to be independent the same way we’re surprised that you don’t have the drive to get married and start a family. I’m in college and believe it or not, it’s common for people to share links to blogposts on facebook; about how much you need to budget and start to save to start a family. Even though they don’t even have bf/gf yet.

      2 years ago
      • I mean its a bit more then just independence. Theirs been one or two koreans I’ve spoken to who want kids but don’t necessarily know “why”. And if you mention that they don’t have to start a family to be successful its just confusing. While i understand different reasons why they do want to start families, they seem unaware that their are other options.

        2 years ago
        • I guess the beauty of knowing other cultures is the ability to evaluate the principles you take for granted. Why is independence so important? Why is family so important? Why the difference in ideas of responsibility and maturity? Have we took tradition/ ways of life and abused it for our own benefit, while being unaware of it’s intended purpose? I don’t know all the answers but I think experience and writings (like this blog post) will fill in the gaps with time.

          2 years ago
    • As Korean American, I would say your observations are generally correct.

      I think the whole parent-child dynamic is different from “the west”. In Korea, most babies sleep with their parents. In US, most babies sleep in their own room, in their own crib. From the birth things are very different, and it does not stop there.

      I also thing the whole notion of “independence” is quite different. I think, to Koreans, that word conjuors up notion of national independence. Maybe it has something to do with its history of frequent invasion by foreign force…

      2 years ago
    • Maintaining the “parent-child” mentality as an adult child is hard for me to understand, too. I can understand living with your parents to save money, but the parents still controlling when and where their children go, what they do, is strange to me. Or when the children complain about certain things, like their mom doesn’t make the food they want, but contribute in no way to the household.

      2 years ago
      • I agree with you. My parents never tried to control my life so when I see parents trying to control their 25 year old’s life in drama it feels so weird. I’m not saying that drama necessarily reflects real life but that trope being used in like 80% of drama, that must be true somewhat, no?

        2 years ago
        • I don’t think it’s just a trope in dramas. Watch Hello Counselor (a talk show; English-subbed episodes can be found on the KBS World Youtube page) sometime and find some concerns where adult children are living with their parents. The concern isn’t even about their adult children living with them; it’s often about something little that happens in their house. But I still think it’s weird that no one seems to care or think that their concern could be solved if the adult children moved out. For example, one concern was an adult son who hated that his mom made the same food every night (I think it was a kimchi pancake or something like that). But no one ever said that he might be able to solve his problem if he moved out or just made his own food! Why does his mom still have to cook everything for him?! Why can’t he cook dinner for a night?

          2 years ago
  33. It kind of varies in the SF Bay Area. Cost of living is high here now, and I know of plenty of people that live with parents after graduating from college/university. I have a friend in his mid 30s still living with his parents. I’m in my late 20s myself and living with my parents.

    Houses here can range from US $300k to 1mil. 1BR in the Peninsula (Mountain View, Palo Alto) is 500k and up. 3BR in East Bay (Fremont, Newark) is roughly 500k. Apartment rents are roughly $1k/month.

    It really depends on your job; the pay, the location. Since the parents are older than the kids, they’ve most likely purchased a house when it was cheaper years ago, before the cost went way up.

    2 years ago
  34. In Brazil is quite common to have kids are free loaders (at the age of 30-40) … There isn’t so much of a stigma here, it really depends on the family.

    2 years ago
  35. I’m happy that this video is out as it will brighten my day slightly. However I’m still very sad to hear about the ship today and that probably a lot of persons now have passed away due to the cold water.

    2 years ago
  36. This is super interesting and really relevant to my life right now. After living 6 years on my own, I am moving back in with my family. Why? Because I can’t afford to pay for rent/food/gas/living and my student loan payments. They are just too high.

    This is really difficult for me because of the negative connotations that moving back in with your family brings. I feel ashamed every time I’m like “yeah… I’m moving home next month.” People automatically are like, “so where are you getting an apartment at.” So when I say “well, I’m moving in with my grandpa. it’s rent free.” They give me that look like “oh, so you’re moving back home.” As in “you’re moving back in with your parents.”

    2 years ago
    • I want to clarify, though, and say that I’m excited to be near my family again after 6 years. I just wish it wasn’t viewed as such a negative thing or like i’ve failed at life like some people make it out to be.

      I just need a little help right now. In my area of the U.S.A., though, if you are not extremely independent, you’re not trying hard enough.

      2 years ago
      • I agree there is nothing wrong with living with family. I’m half South Pacific Islander and its normal to live in extended families. I’ve lived in Australia for 20 years now and from what I can tell young people try and move out of home as soon as possible. I’ve also heard the term used for people who move back in with family as Boomerang children.

        I’ve also moved back in with my family after many years living away from home. I get the same reaction with other Australians when I say I live with at home. However I work with asylum seekers and when they find out I live at home their reaction is always the opposite.

        2 years ago
        • I just think it is odd because it is not like I’m bumming off my family or anything. I have a good job and it pays well. My student loan bills are just higher.

          I just tell people that right now it is a smarter decision for me. And I don’t like living by myself anyway!

          What are asylum seekers?

          2 years ago
        • Good for you!! I actually quite like living with them even though I sometimes miss my own space.

          Asylum seekers are those who come from countries that are experiencing a lot of conflict like civil war and have traveled to other countries like Australia seeking asylum/safety.

          2 years ago
  37. I live in the US but where I am from (Ivory Coast) it’s more like Korea.
    Men tend to live with their parents until they have a job and saved enough to move on their own (even if it’s to a small studio), and women tend to stay until they are married. It’s rare to see a young woman living on her own even in her mid/ late 20s. She will be with some family even if she is working. I guess it helps with the financial burden and gives the impression that your family is shielding/ protecting you for having men stay over at your place and you being promiscuous…

    2 years ago
  38. Haha that Sweden joke, but seriously. People move out as fast as possible and since we get our uni’s founded and get both “allowance” and student loans. It means people usually move out when they are around 20 years old. :)

    From Sweden here xD

    2 years ago
  39. First? OMG
    Well, to keep it short, you only move out when you get married, or if your job is stable enough to have the income to pay rent and/or buy your own place. Most people search houses, but lately there’s been a raise in apartment searches. (I’m from Peru btw)

    2 years ago
  40. In the south of Europe we stay at our parents home for longer. In Spain, for example, it’s common that most university students live with their parents, and because finding a job is difficult, they may stay there until their 30’s

    2 years ago
    • I disagree. There is the pressure to move out, it’s just really damn expensive.

      2 years ago
    • I’m spanish and I’d say that’s mainly because of the country’s economic state. Young people can’t afford living by themselves now but in the past it was definitely looked down upon if you were 30 and still living with your parents. The “your living under my house so you have to cope with my rules” thingy also exists here

      2 years ago
    • I’m from spain and what we usually do is move out and live with other students during university and then go back to your parent’s house because you can’t afford renting or buying a house

      2 years ago
    • In Brazil it’s almost the same, but here is more common to stay with your parents until you marry, and even if you moved out to study in a university, it’s normal to get back. But if you enter your 30’s and have a good job people will start looking strange at you.

      2 years ago
    • is it because the south of EU is more conservative?

      2 years ago
      • dp

        2 years ago
      • No, spain isn’t conervative. The problem is economic.

        2 years ago
      • I would say it’s because of the economy right now.

        2 years ago
      • Not necessarily. I think it’s just it’s more family oriented. It used to be more conservative in the past, but now, no one cares, really.

        2 years ago
        • I think the problem is economic. I’m 27, I have a couple of part time jobs, I’m studying a master’s degree and living with my parents. I really want to move out and become more independent but because my financial status is bad and I don’t have a proper job to sustain myself with, I can’t live on my own or even share an appartment as some of my friends do.

          The financial crisis makes it very difficult for everyone in Spain to find a job that could pay your living expenses. Even for university graduates like me. That’s why a lot of people in Spain is “emigrating” to other countries (i’m definitely considering it an option)

          It’s true that we have a pretty family oriented culture but we also like to have our own space and be independent from our parents. I agree with Tatiana that it’s not because it is more conservative, not anymore, at least.

          2 years ago
        • I myself had to emigrate to Spain when little, and I’m perfectly aware that I’ll have to emigrate again. At the beggining it’ll be hard for you but then you’ll get used to it.

          2 years ago
        • Exactly, economy is the main step back right now.

          2 years ago
    • Its the same in my country Peru even though we are in South America and not Europe c:

      2 years ago
      • Hey I’m from Peru too :) … It’s also very common to live with at least one grandparent. Maybe is the whole thing about taking care of your family, but I’ve noticed that having the elderly living alone or in a home is common in the U.S

        2 years ago
    • Yes, I also live in Spain but in my country – Portugal – it’s the same. Even though me and my parents lived with my maternal grandparents before we moved out of the country.

      2 years ago
      • A Portuguese Nasty! :D My cousins live in Aveiro. (family is from Lisbon and Porto, although I have roots in Algarve too)

        2 years ago
        • I’m from Aveiro (city), but I live in Northern Catalonia, in Spain, 8km away from France. My family is from Anadia, Mangualde and Barcelos, mainly. And my mom was born in Angola as well. :)

          2 years ago
    • Same over here in Greece :) But then I’ve always found that Greece/Spain/Italy are fairly similar culture-wise!

      2 years ago
      • Together with Andorra-France-Portugal :)

        2 years ago
        • I wouldn’t agree with that. I’m french and the common thing when you graduate from highschool and if you go to university, you necessarily look for a place to live on your own (or woth roomates). Of course if you live close to your university you tend to stay with your parents because it’s cheaper. But it’s hard to say that we live completely on our own, it depends on families. I personnally had a place for my self as soon as I went to uni but my parents place was still home. I just had 2 homes ^^. And later, for the ones that are still at home even after graduating from college, staying at home is definitely not a choice and it’s never really well seen. Culturally in France we don’t live with our grandparents and parents, I personnaly wouldn’t like to ^^

          2 years ago
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