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TL;DR – Koreanized Foreign Food

April 9, 2014

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So, this was a rather impromptu TL;DR we did. On Monday, we went to Hannam-dong to visit the Meemers, who had to stay at the vet for 72 hours while they flushed out his system from the poison that nearly killed his bladder. He’s safe now! Success! He has a new diet now that could prevent it from happening in the future. I’m just happy the little guy isn’t in pain anymore :D

Point is, while we were there, we went to a foreign restaurant for some foreign food. I’m not gonna say which one because I don’t want to badmouth it, just in case it was just having a bad day, but I was really unimpressed. Sure, it tasted a bit like the food it was supposed to represent, but it was missing so many spices, and swapped out ingredients for the closest readily-available substitute, that I was disappointed as a whole. These kinds of experiences are common here in Korea, and – though you’ll surely find a good restaurant from time to time that serves really authentic stuff – more often than not you’re gonna get a knockoff that just doesn’t satisfy, if you’re particular like how we are.

We talked about a few of our experiences in the video, but we didn’t talk about desserts here that are really…different. Baked goods are very different a lot of the time. Breads are very sweet. Garlic bread has a sweet glaze. Cheesecake here is oftentimes not a dense cream cheese, but a fluffy kind of cake, with cheese flavor. So, yes, it’s cheese cake, but not cheesecake, you know?

One thing you might have to get used to if you get fruits with your deserts, like on cakes or ice cream or whatnot, is that cherry tomatoes in Korea fall under the fruit category. We’ve had cakes with tomatoes on them, patbingsu with tomatoes on it. Which, I understand, tomatoes are technically fruits, but they’re not supposed to be eaten like fruits…are they?

Story time! here’s a mind warp: when Martina was teaching, she asked her students about tomatoes in Ice Cream. She said she doesn’t understand, because even though tomatoes are fruits, they should be eaten like vegetables, rather than fruitily, right? Her students disagreed. Tomatoes should be eaten like fruits, EVEN THOUGH THEY’RE VEGETABLES. So, Martina – being the caring, educating teacher that she was – pulled it up on Google. Tomatoes are fruits. See there. Google says so. And Google never lies! The students took over the computer and opened up Naver. What’s Naver say about tomatoes? THAT THEY’RE VEGETABLES! *mind blown* So, which one is it? What am I doing here in Bizarroland? Or is this Normal-land, and I’m the one who was born and raised in Bizarroland?! Someone telllll meeeee!

Another thing we hinted at but didn’t get the chance to talk about is Costco hotdogs. Where I’m from, I’m used to putting mustard, relish, and ketchup on my hotdog. In Korea, though, they put a gigantic amount of mustard, relish, ketchup, and diced onions ON A PLATE. Make a giant plate of all this stuff, mix it up, and eat it like salad. There’s not a small amount put on the hot dog: it’s a giant amount put on a plate and eaten with a fork. I don’t understand why. Soo Zee doesn’t understand why. It’s not a Korean side dish seen anywhere else. It’s just a Costco phenomenon. I want to make a video of it to show you what it’s like, but I’m not sure how, without being offensive to others, but…I’m just confused by the whole thing.

I’m gonna open this up to the comments now, because I realize there’s a potential issue I might be suffering. What if Korean people come to Canada, eat Mexican food and say “hell, this ain’t what Mexican food is like!” It could be the reverse, right? I’m not sure what authentic Mexican is like, really. Though, when we were in Mexico the food we had there was closer to what we had in Toronto than what we had in Korea. And the Indian food in Toronto closer to what we had in Singapore than what we had in Korea. I’ve never had pasta or pizza from Italy, though. Maybe sweet potato mousse is Italian? I don’t know. So, tell me: if you’ve travelled, have you noticed how different foods taste than how they’re “supposed” to taste? Let us know!

Otherwise, if you liked this TL;DR, make sure you click on this fancy pants button below, right here. It tastes the same in all countries, by the way, but in case you’re not sure, lick your screen and let us know :D

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TL;DR – Koreanized Foreign Food

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  1. Oh corn… You can find it in a lot of places in Japan too. I don’t even like corn. *sigh* And things like salad which is pretty rare here they will offer you corn salad. No that is not salad it’s just corn where is my green stuff!?!?
    Ahem… Korean garlic bread… Yeah one of the first things I ate when I came to Seoul was small pieces of garlic bread. I joked to my friend that I bet it’s gonna be sweet, and it was. OTL I also ate cheese cake in Korea and yup it tasted kinda cheesy, not that good but ok.
    As for Korean food in Finland, I don’t think we even have Korean reastaurants in my city… I also haven’t eaten Korean food in Japan. Maybe I should try is it the same as I’ve eaten.

    2 years ago
  2. I’ve been somewhat disappointed with the southeast Asian food. I get the impression that Koreans can’t handle spicy food unless that spice happens to be red pepper paste. Because that’s in 80% of the food and they’ve built up an immunity.

    When someone in a restaurant warns me that the food is spicy, it never is. When they don’t warn me, sometimes it blows the top of my head off because it’s, as one example, a big pot of gochujang with a little bit of octopus for decoration.

    2 years ago
    • I think foods of a country make outside the country is never going to be the same as them made in the country. The spices are always going to be different. Even the ingredients of the foods are going to make it really different thus taste different. Its actually hard to be the same and as the need to change it to make it more acceptable to people who aren’t used to the authentic taste. After it is a business, they cater to 90% of the people taste bud. Thai + Vietnamese foods are pretty spicy if you find the right restaurant. Sometimes, you just have to add the oily red spicy paste that they have, it really helps. Most people can’t really handle if it is too spicy so I think restaurants really cater to that. A lot of foods I don’t find spicy at all but my friends are like too spicy already.

      2 years ago
    • You know, I don’t even find Korean food spicy anymore. I get a bit annoyed when we order spicy food and they say “really? It’s spicy! Can you handle it?” I wanna be like “I CAN RUB THIS IN MY EYES IT AIN’T SPICY!” But I know they’re being considerate. Most people can’t handle the level of spice we can handle, but I also think most Korean people can’t handle the spice we can handle, either. Mexican spice? Indian spice? I don’t think so…

      2 years ago
      • I remember when you guys talked about the ahjumma with the food stall that told you “No, it’s too spicy, not for foreigners.” XD Been sooooo long.

        2 years ago
  3. HEY!!! i love corn!! and i love it on my pizza!!! as a British citizen i now disown you!!!
    i have this problem when i go to Bangladesh! when i wanna eat normal bread or nice pizza it tastes sweet!! it’s…Bengalified?

    i was taught that tomatoes are fruits!! but i don’t think anyone hardly eats it as a fruit….it’s more used like a vegetable!

    2 years ago
    • Wait… They ACTUALLY put corn on pizza in the UK? I’ve never had any like that.. But then again, my mum is obsessed with Italy, so I guess she would refuse to take us anywhere except a ‘proper’ Italian place.

      2 years ago
      • i’ve never went to a proper Italian place to eat….haha! the ones in the city centre seem too posh and..well…the prices…not for me and my friends!!
        i usually eat at Pizza Hut and now that i think about it i’m not sure if i have corn on the pizzas there, BUT i always get corn on pizza from the local pizza stores for definite!

        the one thing i HATE on pizza is pineapple!! WHY WOULD I WANT FRUIT ON MY PIZZA?

        2 years ago
        • Except tomatoes are kind of fruit, and those are smothered all over the dough.

          2 years ago
        • haha yes, yes it is! but like i said it’s used more like a vegetable!
          tomato on pizza is also the only time i can stand tomato!! i don’t even have tomato ketchup!

          2 years ago
      • I’ve never seen corn on pizza here in Scotland. :O

        2 years ago
        • So I’m not alone in this! Where is this stereotype coming from?!

          2 years ago
  4. I don’t want to make matters worse… but do you know that if you call a tomato a fruit, you’ll have to call many other vegetables fruit? Like avocado, cucumber, squash, etc… All those things are technically a fruit because they came from the flower and contain the seed(s). Sorry if it’s not clear, English is not my first language.

    2 years ago
  5. Smerk …”Ranch is an accessory to food”…… like it was driving the get-away car

    2 years ago
  6. I am a legit Italian (watching your videos from Rome since the beginning) but I’ve been to the US and UK a lot so whenever I had Italian food withdrawals, I tried their versions of pizza or pasta and let me tell you it is not nearly the same thing. They tend to add so many ingredients to make it more suitable for American/British palate. Therefore I’m not surprised if Koreans do the same but I guess adding corn and giving pickles with every meal is a bit too much…first of all, we don’t really eat pickles; corn is used in salads and also, sweet potatoes are not that popular here in Italy. They’re not something you can easily find at your local grocery store…
    Also, garlic bread- as much as I love that stuff, to the point that I would only eat that when I was in Cali- is not really something you can find on the menu at any Italian restaurant in Italy.

    Nevertheless, I would still try Koreanized Italian food whenever I get the chance to visit Korea. I love Americanized Italian food, especially Domino’s pizza.
    Oh…and I love you guys…like a lot <3

    2 years ago
    • I’m another legit Italian (from Naples) and I agree with you. Even the most “traditional” Italian food (cooked in foreign countries) is very different. Some dishes don’t even exist xD The best example would be that cooking show with the Cake Boss… It makes me shiver xD Anyway, you should come to Italy and eat the real deal!

      P.S. I’m a great fan of yours, especially of your FAPFAPs :D

      2 years ago
    • Australian pizza is definitely not “traditional Italian” by any means but I had a bit of a “WTF? this is not what a pizza is meant to be like!” when I went to Vancouver Canada (!). My partner and I went to Domino’s which is originally Canadian and for a start the whole process of ordering a pizza was different. This was 2005 so it may have changed but we were kinda shocked that you could only select up to three toppings for your pizza and then it was extra after that. We’re used to pizza being sold according to a type of pizza flavour combo e.g. Supreme etc. which contains AT LEAST three toppings. The pizzas in Melbourne where I’m from are better than other states in my opinion because there seems to be a lot more Italian food influence through immigration.
      Fun facts about Pizza in Melbourne Australia:
      1. International Pizza Franchises are really unpopular here! Hardly any Pizza Huts anywhere more Domino’s but even then just a few.
      2. There’s a trend in Melbourne to have gourmet pizza. Small pizza businesses thrive and they tend to have a gourmet selection including a signature pizza of their own creation that is often a bit weird and experimental. For instance my local place has a butter chicken pizza which is divine! I’ve tried a nacho pizza which was not so good because the corn chips were soggy :P

      3. It’s typical for a pizza place especially small businesses, to sell an “Aussie” pizza which always has a fried egg on it. I’m not sure what makes this Aussie except that maybe it represents our sunny weather? Fried eggs also appear on burgers and they become “Aussie” burgers too.

      2 years ago
    • Yeah, my dad is in the Navy so I lived in Italy (Naples, home of the real pizza :) ) for three years. Italian pizza is sooo much better than American pizza. It’s all about the sauce – a basic pizza doesn’t even have cheese on it, it’s just the crust, sauce, olive oil, and herbs like basil. When they add cheese it’s mozzarella di bufala and it’s sprinkled on in small pieces that don’t cover the entire thing – American pizza sauce is usually meh and they always cover the whole thing with cheese haha While I’ve had really good pizza in the States, the only time I’ve had something close to my Italian experience is when there was a family from Palermo, Italy that opened up a restaurant here and made pizza (until Hurricane Katrina destroyed the restaurant and they decided not to rebuild :( ). So, since you’re still living in Rome, I am totally jealous haha Italian food is still my ultimate favorite :)

      The Korean sushi you guys mentioned sounds a lot like the sushi they sell in Japanese style restaurants in America. Even the local one which is owned by a Japanese lady tends to have specialty sushis that have lots of sauces and stuff put on top, although they usually have more basic rolls like tuna as well. Problem with most of the Japanese/Chinese places in my area is they tend to be owned by Vietnamese families since we have a large Vietnamese population so I’m not sure how “authentic” they are haha. When it comes to Mexican, my favorite Mexican restaurant is owned by a Hispanic family and I like it a lot more than chain restaurants. Not sure how authentic it is to Mexico but I like it :) I actually have a local Korean restaurant I really like to go to that is owned by a Korean family – we have a small amount of Korean residents in our area and the waitress there says they get a lot of military members coming since their kimchi tastes like what they had when they were stationed in South Korea. So although it’s my only real experience with Korean food I assume it’s pretty authentic (and it tastes really good :) ).

      2 years ago
    • I’m Italian too, but from the North (Verona) and I’ve never seen garlic-bread before! We have onion-bread even though it’s not that common.
      I travelled a lot trhough Europe and what I noticed is that all the “Italian restaurants” are run by Turkish who pretend to be Italians…and pizza is more like a focaccia full of things on it. And Pasta, well, let’s say I had to eat what they gave me. It’s rare to find somebody that can cook real Italian food.

      2 years ago
      • Hahahah I know!!! Pasta is the worst thing they make in a foreign country…that’s why I prefer to eat pizza: even if the taste is not the same, it’s better than having any pasta plate they would try to sell as “real, authentic Italian pasta”…comunque ciao finalmente un’altra italiana hahaha

        2 years ago
    • Hi Martina, what was Italian food like before the tomato? Is it the main ingredient in most real Italian food or just Americanized Italian food? Thanks, Brandon

      2 years ago
      • Tomato is absolutely one of the main ingredients in Italian food. Wether it’s used to make pasta or pizza sauce or even sliced and put onto pizzas or salads or other dishes. But we certainly don’t use it as a dessert…I think only Koreans would do that lol ^^

        2 years ago
        • Cool, thanks. Do you know about the “old” food though. The tomato is native to the Americas. What was Italian food like before the 1500’s? It’s hard for me to imagine Italian food without tomatoes.

          2 years ago
      • It’s pretty big in real Italian food as well.

        2 years ago
    • Interestingly, from what I’ve heard, Pizza is actually an Italian-American invention. So it moved to Italy rather than originating there. That being said, Italian pizza is 100x better. :)

      2 years ago
      • YES. The taste of real, Italian pizza made in a stone oven in Rome is a taste I will never forget. I was so impressed!

        2 years ago
      • Omg really?? Pizza actually originated in Naples in the XVI century. The only American contribution was the tomato which was brought to Europe and even though it was considered poisonous at first, poor people would use it as a topping for this kind of flat bread.

        2 years ago
      • Pizza definitely originated in Italy! The “modern” pizza originated in Naples (aka the traditional thin crust kind) and was brought to America by Italian immigrants. However, all the other kinds you can get in America (like deep dish etc) were invented by Americans, haha.

        2 years ago
    • you went to cali and ate domino’s? shame on you! so many better pizza places in cali than that crap

      2 years ago
      • Actually I’ve never tried Domino’s in Cali (at least I think…I didn’t look at the box when they were feeding me pizza lol) but when I lived in London I tried it cause it was one of the few names I was familiar with.

        2 years ago
    • I am an American, and I visited Rome a little over a year ago. BEST FOOD EVER!!!!! (And not forgetting the best cappuccino I ever had in my life!!!!) : D It totally ruined me to Americanized Italian food and American coffee shops. When I came home I had withdrawals because there aren’t that many authentic Italian restaurants where I live. I think it’s because so many of the ingredients are either not available or they are expensive. So far I’ve only found one authentic Italian restaurant – it’s pricey, but worth it! Wish I could eat there everyday….

      On the positive side, there are some specialty Italian grocery stores in my city. The selection is limited, but it is definitely possible to make some dishes better than what’s available in restaurants. : )

      2 years ago
      • Oooh that’s awesome!!! I’ve never heard of specialty Italian grocery stores…sounds like expensive though. When I was living in London someone told me they sold Italian biscotti but they were freaking expensive so I passed on buying those :( If you get the chance though try them at least once: they’re different from American cookies and all that stuff (which is amazing anyway eheh) ^^

        2 years ago
        • Usually you can find a specialty grocery store when an area or neighborhood has a large number of people from a particular group. Chicago has a lot of Italians and people of Italian descent, so there are a couple of very large, very nice supermarkets that specialize in Italian food (that’s not including Eataly, which is a like Ikea for Italian food, but extremely expensive). There are also supermarkets that specialize in Indian food, Japanese food, Korean food, Mexican food, Puerto Rican food, Vietnamese food, etc. etc.

          2 years ago
        • Eataly is expensive in Italy as well. Maybe cause they sell organic stuff and a lot of products are “home made” and you can’t find these small businesses, they have a partnership with, in regular supermarkets.
          We also have specialty South American and Chinese grocery stores and it’s understandable cause there are a lot of South Americans and Chinese people living here but what surprised me the most was finding two Korean grocery stores. I am so happy about it and I never mind going the extra mile to fill up on ramen and kimchi but what’s weird is that I hardly ever see the Korean population that should be living in that neighbourhood… I mean COME OUT O’DA SHELLS PEOPLE!!!!

          2 years ago
    • Is it wrong then sometimes to get Italian food withdrawals, when you’re not from Italy. Personally, I think Italian food is among the best in Europe. ;)

      2 years ago
      • Hahah I don’t think it’s wrong. As much as I dislike some aspects of my country, Italian food is something I’ll always brag about cause it really is the best food ever, especially in Europe. Don’t get me wrong: I love me some Andalucian paella or German sausage but Italian food has that something that makes you miss it so much when you don’t get to eat it on a daily basis.

        2 years ago
        • lol English food XD hahaha no Italian is just so savory it really does just stand out :)

          2 years ago
        • yeah all BUT English food…that really I can’t digest lol

          2 years ago
    • Does this mean that garlic bread is the Italian version of fortune cookies (which you don’t get in China but everywhere in North America with Chinese food)?

      2 years ago
      • Garlic bread is not even served as a side dish at restaurants. It’s like something my grandma would eat whenever she doesn’t feel like cooking or when there’s not much food around. I guess it’s because when she was young and Italy was at war, bread was all they had (if they could get some) and garlic made it taste like they were actually eating something.
        Chinese restaurants in Italy don’t serve fortune cookies; as a matter fact, I don’t think I’ve ever seen Chinese fortune cookies anywhere in Italy, not even Asian supermarkets.

        2 years ago
        • Fortune Cookies are a purely American invention. :) I believe it began somewhere in New York.

          2 years ago
        • Actually it was popularized in California in the San Francisco area. It was originally based on a Japanese rice cracker thing and was actually likely brought over by Japanese immigrants. It just became really popular among all asians and were sold at Chinese restaurants. And for a lot of Americans at the time Asian immigrant=Chinese……

          2 years ago
        • Isn’t garlic bread made with pizza dough leftovers? (Because, pizza dough is basically the same as bread dough, right?)
          I love italian pizzas, they’re thin and made with fresh and simple ingredients! Plus they’re cheap (in Italy).

          2 years ago
        • i think you’re talking about garlic knots (i think it an americanized italian food though)

          2 years ago
        • Actually that’s not something we make in Italy. I even looked it up in Italian and all the cooking sites referred to the American “garlic bread” that you can get at Domino’s or places like that. Pizza and bread have almost the same ingredients but the preparation is different. Bread takes a long time and certain techniques to make…I wouldn’t know though cause I’m the worst at cooking hahah

          2 years ago
  7. How about chinese food? Like jajangmyeon? I heard it tastes pretty different in korea and china…

    2 years ago
    • Jajangmyeon in Korea is the famous black bean sauce derivative. In China, depending on the region, it’s a reddish coloured sauce, different noodle, and more minced pork.

      2 years ago
  8. Well it’s official, I can’t come to Korea because I’ll starve to death because I am such a picky eater. I can end up disliking a place when they get the taste wrong for a meal I like, I will never order it again.
    I think it goes hand to hand with the fact that not only you, but a good chunk of us come from places where it’s more “authentic”, even though we know that foreign food is bastardized everywhere. like I know I can head to a restaurant in the next town over and get some fairly authentic food. Especially living in Hawaii where there’s a lot of places that still stick to their roots and there’s immigrants who move here and it’s easier to get things that are needed to make some of these meals.
    But seriously I got the shudders when you guys talked about the Korean version of foods, that seems horrible. Especially when you have serious cravings. No wonder you hear people who just eat when they get home, I would too

    2 years ago
    • You’d have to break out of that picky bubble and try a bunch of different places until you found a winner! For example, the Korean style soupy pasta is not our thing but we’ve found some awesome pasta places that make their own pasta from scratch and taste amazing. You just have to explore like in any other city. Don’t give up!!!

      2 years ago
  9. I have no problem here in Russia (Moscow) with some authentic restaurants (Mexican, Thai, Korean namely) because most of them are run by native citizens or someone who knows the business. Japanese food on the other hand is a bit more complicated – there are some really nice authentic places, but probably because of the fact that Japanese food is waayyy too popular in Russia, we have much more bad and westernized so called Japanese restaurants and I really don’t like them :( The fun fact is though – I have a couple of Japanese friends who have tried these ‘kinda Japanese’ food, they say it’s not japanese at all but it’s delicious. I think they are just being nice :)

    2 years ago
  10. in england we have a main stream japanese restaurant called yosushi. I think its a nice place that does grate food but i find it can be rather cosytly. i perfer to go to the cheaper wasbi chain restaurants instead that not only lets you eat in store but also has a take out section. wasbi even taste just as good as yousushi but also at like half the price. The only down side is that my local wasbi is in london which is like 4 hours away from me but my local yosushi is like 30 minutes from me. i also went to a nice korean resturant in london but I havent been too see if there are any nice local ones yet.

    also i have a question do they have any English styled pubs in Korea?

    2 years ago
    • oh my god wasabi is so bad…im sorry to tell you but every single chain east asian food restaurant in london/england is not authentic At.All. yosushi, wasabi, wagamama, itsu are the biggest 4 i can think of right now, and anything east asian you might find in Eat or Pret a manger, they are unanimously godawful in the eyes of people whov come from east-asia. it would be fine if it was at least yummy but just not authentic, like how simon and martina spoke about koreanized food, but its not even that… iv tried a few things at each of these places before out of desperation and like the watery pasta s n m mentioned, its sorta like that, everything is watered down and not even a watered down version of the real thing, just totally totally off and disappointing.. i ordered tempura once at yosushi and it came out looking like mini corn dogs, everything covered in something completely smooth and dark brown, i was so mad already after the sadness of my water ramen that i insisted on not eating it and getting a refund because it literally wasnt tempura, the servers didnt really understand what i meant but they were nice enough to accept my request. even the texture of the noodles can be really strange at these chains, it tastes like certain hardernoodle brands of instant noodles, just really cheap and plasticky.

      im sorry if i sound like im coming down too hard but seriously all my east asian friends hate these places as much as i do and i really really suggest trying to find a non-chain place thats packed with east asians rather than caucasians/british if you want to try real ea food

      2 years ago
      • dear god, i hate yo sushi as well haha. the quality is the WORST. that said, the whole idea of the place is fun, but the food itself is terrible. i hate wagamama too. but i must say wasabi is not horrible, the fast food/hot food aspect is terrible, but the premade sushi are not bad for the price you pay! i’d much rather eat wasabi sushi packs for a quick on the go lunch than whatever other weird stuff you find on the high street haha. btw – if you guys are ever in london have a look for the KIMCHEE chain – it’s kind of a korean version of wasabi. i haven’t had a chance to try it yet though.

        2 years ago
  11. I am from Indonesia and I never tried Mexican Food in my whole life… I can’t find any Mexican restaurant in Indonesia and I think it’s not really popular there
    until I went to Australia to continue my study, I had nachos, burritos etc (I just knew their existence at that time except nachos, but I only eat it as a snack before, not as a whole dish). it’s like Mexican Food just flood into my life in a short time

    2 years ago
  12. THE COSTCO ONION PLATE. That thing is a cornerstone of Korean innovation. I’ve also seen a to-go version where they fill the soda cups with onion/mustard concoction and take it on home with them.

    2 years ago
  13. Ohmahgawd! I know the restaurant you’re referring to with the whole burrito-with-only-rice-and-heinz-beans… it’s in Hongdae across from that park. My stars, they do their own take on Mexican. Luckily Dos Tacos in just around the corner, and it may not be muy authentico, but they knock out a decent taco al pastor!

    2 years ago
  14. Ramen has fast become one of my favourite foods! Got no idea if the stuff I get in Australia is accurate, but it’s delicous nonetheless. Pork/tonkatsu ramen fo lyfe!

    2 years ago
    • I’m jealous. Ramen we get in America is prepackaged and has to be cooked in a microwave or stove top. ;o; I want to try the legit ramen so bad!

      2 years ago
    • I ate last year for lunch 90% just ramen, cause it’s cheap and tasty :)

      2 years ago
      • That must have been a good year :)
        I’m craving ramen so bad right now, even dreamt about it last night :O

        2 years ago
        • Well actually I can’t eat this kind of ramen anymore cause I ate too much of them. But when I’m at home I always make my own soup (?) for the ramen. I put some red pepper paste in water, add vegetables, salt, pepper, yogurt and chili flakes and than I cook the ramen in it. That’s really delicious and better than the pulver soup thing ^_^

          2 years ago
        • That sounds delicious too :)

          2 years ago
    • I haven’t had Ramen in Australia. Does yours come with the special boiled egg that has the super creamy yolk?

      2 years ago
      • I don’t actually like eggs so I’ve never tried the ones that come with Aussie ramen.

        2 years ago
      • I had ramen in Australia and yes it does come with special boiled egg

        2 years ago
      • I’d have to sacrifice an arm for that special ramen.

        2 years ago
        • I’ve had Ramen in Australia and Japan and we have good and bad here. Ajisen Ramen(which you can get at singapore airport) is the best we have here. A delicious broth and boiled eggs. Nothing will compare to Japan’s though!

          2 years ago
        • Have you tried Ippudo? It’s the best ramen I’ve ever had! Also I’ve eaten at their restaurants in Japan and their one in Sydney and it’s pretty much exactly the same!
          Not sure if I’ve tried Ajisen though. Might have to check them out too :) I totally love Ramen……maybe even as much as Simon!! Especially the egg!!! One time my egg was completely hard-boiled and I was shattered :(

          2 years ago
  15. two hands up !!!!! pls come to germany !

    2 years ago
  16. Hey, I live in Cheonan, I’ve been here since August. I’d say that most of the Vietnamese and Thai food I’ve had here has been pretty inauthentic. The noodles are just… wrong and the substitution of lemons in place of limes is also not so good. Here in Cheonan, we do have some good Indian places. I’ve noticed that Indian restaurants in Korea seem to be about the only foreign food places operated by foreigners who are from the same country that the food being served is also from. This seems to help a great deal. Also, we do have one GOOD Japanese ramen place here and also a Mexican place owned by Americans that serves really good California-style Mexican. So, if you’re ever in town, give this girl a call and I’ll show you around! ^^

    2 years ago
  17. A friend of mine put tomatoes in fruit salad once, I found it so weird! By the way, you guys should totally come to Malaysia sometime and check out our awesome food! It’s literally a food haven :D Oh and about inauthentic foreign food, I’m studying in Melbourne at the moment and whenever I go for Asian food, I find that it’s been tailored to Western tastebuds, especially when it comes to spiciness levels. One thing I’ve noticed that restaurants here like to do when they want to call something Asian (okay more like Malaysian) is cook it with or drown it in satay sauce. I’ve seen some really bizarre combinations of stuff with satay sauce that don’t sound appetizing at all! I have no idea where this idea came about that Malaysian food = satay sauce, we really don’t put it on everything!

    2 years ago
    • It’s a shame, really. I’m guessing cultural exposure is what left the satay sauce impression on Australian minds, as is evident at my uni food court, where they serve crumbed chicken with satay sauce. NO, JUST… NO. My family and I (and my Singaporean friend) always say that there’s not enough lard in the dishes to make it taste like the real Singaporean/Malaysian foods. Also, completely agree on the spiciness.

      2 years ago
  18. i think this is pretty common everywhere around the world! as countries start opening up they create versions of foreign food that they think will cater more to local palettes and it takes a while to get people used to more unusual flavours.
    i lived in poland for a while, around when some of the first “authentic” foreign food was appearing (not including french and italian food) and there were some truly amusing/crazy interpretations of food, the most baffling of which were things like cabbage replacing lettuce (it’s green and crunchy, SAME THING RIGHT???)

    2 years ago
  19. Hrm… yeah. Luckily for us Aussies (this is Brisbane I’m speaking of), we have ‘some’ authentic Mexican restaurants/fast food chains like Montezuma’s (wasn’t a terribly good experience for me) and Guzman y Gomez (now this I can vouch for). Italian food is plentiful, mainly because of the large population (mainly in Melbourne/Sydney). Indian food is quite nice here (although you can now get it ready-to-eat at supermarkets), though obviously the heat is toned down. Japanese food? If you don’t want to pay $15-30 for what I’m assuming is the genuine, real deal stuff because you’re a cheapskate or a uni student, then there’s decent cheap Japanese food if you can find it. Most of the sushi roll places, though, are owned and staffed by Koreans (Mayo in almost everything is probably a good sign). Lastly on desserts, the gelatin sugar glaze is staple in any Western-style cakes (with a few exceptions).

    Question, Simon and Martina: Have you tried the gloriousness that is a Japanese Cheesecake?!

    P.S. Should really be doing my genetics assignment but I think if I do any more tonight I’ll be on the verge of a meltdown.

    2 years ago
  20. Living in Los Angeles I’m lucky to have great Mexican food. Since I live in the koreatown area, I have a lot of Korean friends and we try places just to see how Korean the food is. Most of the time, they tell me it’s just Americanized versions, even though most of the ingredients are readily available. In all honesty, I think only twice I can think of when my Korean friends were blown away with Korean food here.

    Now I’m ruined by Indian food. My friend’s mom made the best butter chicken and I just can’t find any place that comes close! I guess I’ll keep trying until I find something.

    2 years ago
  21. Oh yeah. We Brits defo like corn on our pizza ;)
    I think what sucks in England is the Chinese food; it’s generally really bad and stuffed with additives that turn it all florescent orange…
    You learn though; head for the restaurants where all the Chinese students go :D
    There’s also a distinct lack of Korean food here, which is really sad :(
    I want to try bubble tea so badly, but I have yet to find a place that sells it…

    2 years ago
    • as far i as i remembered i believe there is a bubble tea place in china town in london, they also have a nice Korean restaurant there too called corean chilly that is quite cheep. Though there are lots of nice looking restaurants and shops in china town. im hoping to go back in the summer.

      2 years ago
      • Aha. I shall have to make a trip to London in the summer. I’ve heard there’s Korea town as well as China town, which would be a lot of fun to visit :D

        2 years ago
        • there is a Korean town but its just outside of central london, a tube pass will get you there but its not the easiest place to get to. I found that china itself had a nice range of Korean stuff though as there where a few supermarkets there that sold a whole range of asian food. then i found a shop that sold expensive kpop cds and then there was also a nice small kpop shop. i didnt have enough time too look round the whole of china town but it has a wide range of different asian stuff to offer.

          2 years ago
  22. Oh yes. Come back to Singapore for more food. Food makes the world go round. I live in Singapore and I have no idea if any of the food is actually similar to any of the food as it is from their original country, except for Chinese food, but they taste good to me since I’ve eaten them all my life so yeah. Plus that one time I had Jjajangmyeon and tteokbokki in a small shop at Plaza Sing and damn it was so good. I would want to go celebrate black day there but I have school hahah;;

    2 years ago
    • lol well, I can vouch for the Filipino food :P but I’m guessing more European/American foods is what you’re describing? Also, it seems there’s a strange ‘Australian’ restaurant that I’ve NEVER HEARD OF.

      2 years ago
  23. I don’t know if it’s a thing other places – but in Denmark everyone seems to love pizza with pineapple ^_^

    2 years ago
  24. I moved from Japan to Korea and yes, not being able to find good Japanese food is so bizarre to me. My husband and I went out of our way for some ramen that SeoulEats said was good and it ended up being pretty disappointing. The broth wasn’t that bad but the noodles weren’t fresh at all. As far as sushi goes, some Japanese sushi has toppings on it, especially if you go some place like Kappa sushi (100 yen per plate sushi) but yes, traditional sushi restaurants would never carry that and I think Korean sushi takes it to the extreme. What’s even more disappointing is how thin the nigiri sushi is sliced. Don’t we live on a peninsula?

    2 years ago
  25. I’m fairly certain that most foreign restaurants have authentic food here in The Netherlands, although I’ve heard that some do not. I have a Thai friend who says Thai restaurants where I live are not authentic, hehe. But I haven’t ever had a chance to try the local Japanese place cause it’s so expensive…But at my bookclub once, the host lady ordered some sushi and Oh man, it was soooo good! I was about to dive into it Simon piggy style but..I didn’t want to be rude, so I didn’t. And that’s my story, yay.

    2 years ago
  26. *raises hand* You guys should come to Germany!! That whole GEMA thing really freaking sucks since you can’t watch like 95% of any kpop mvs :/ I always have to wait for someone to eng sub the song before I can watch it.

    I’ve only ever been able to watch one of your livechats live, and that was when I still lived in Canada a couple months ago xD

    And about the corn on pizza: my family it Russian/Polish/German and we have corn on our pizza all the time. I don’t know if it has anything to do with the fact we’re Russian/Polish/German, but whatever, I really like the corn lol. Normally on pizza we’d have regular tomato sauce, tuna, cheese, and then corn on top. It’s really good^^

    2 years ago
  27. You lie!!!! Koreanized garlic bread is actually the worst thing on this earth. It should all be thrown into a landfill and burned. Sweet bread slathered in sugary garlic flavored I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter… I’m gagging just thinking about it ew ew ew. And the pasta is always really sweet too. Unnecessary amounts of sugar in everything here…

    Koreanized Chinese food is pretty good though. Jjajangbap and Tangsuyook… yum

    2 years ago
  28. I think some of the best Korean food I’ve had (apart from the restaurants I’ve visited in Korea) was a restaurant in Geneva, Switzerland called B.A.P. Seriously, that was its name. All the food was delicious and they played K-Pop music (SS501 and Super Junior, hells yh) and the quality of the food was delicious, however slightly less spicy than the foods I had in Korea. If I ever go back to Switzerland I will definitely visit there again!

    2 years ago
  29. I learned in my YR11 food tech class that tomatoes are vegetables but under the “fruit” category of vegetables (with other categories like stem, leaf, etc….)

    2 years ago
  30. I’m pretty sure that what we call Chinese food in Denmark, isn’t Chinese – a friend of mine had a Chinese exchange student live with her, and she laughed at our Chinese restaurants – and I think I heard something about that it’s more like Thai food – so yeah xD

    2 years ago
  31. Also, i love the extra parts at the end of your TDLRs where you answer extra questions. I did noticed how cluttered Korean/Japanese sites seem to be but I thought it was just because I don’t recognize the language.

    2 years ago
  32. We have all sorts of foods here. Korean included. I thought it was quite good, but later on I made one Korean friend and he said it was complete crap. So I have No Idea if it tastes the way it should XD

    2 years ago
  33. I live in the united states (Virgina) and the mexican food here is soooo not authentic! Neither is our japanese food. Actually, most people that work at Japanese restaurants here ARE Mexican and Chinese. It’s weird. One of my good friends from Thailand says the Thai food here is very close to what he has…and it is super yummy! I love our Thai restaurants in Virginia.

    Mostly, I do not eat out because of the way people prepare food here. I’m a super clean eater and like to eat only organic food, and you don’t know what you are getting when you go out to eat.

    Awesome TLDR, very informative! Thank you!

    2 years ago
    • I live in the Virginia/Washington DC/Maryland area, and I was actually just discussing this with a couple friends recently. I have a friend who is from California who always complains about how our Mexican food is not authentic. She is from LA, which has a large population of Mexicans, thus I would assume it is why they have more authentic Mexican food. In the DC general area you will find you have a larger population of other Central American countries as well as South American (Costa Rican, Peruvian, Ecuadorian, etc..), but they’re all generally lumped into one restaurant which is “Mexican.” So basically, my theory is that it depends on who is making it.

      Other than that, in this area we apparently have good Ethiopian and Korean food? I’ve never been outside the country other than Canada or England, so I can’t judge for myself whether restaurants are accurate or not–I base them off of travel shows who come to the area (and have been to the countries the restaurants origin from).

      It’s cool to know our Thai restaurants are close to authentic, though!

      2 years ago
  34. I’ve never had ranch before but the lack of ranch in Korea makes me worry; how well stocked is Korea in terms of red sauce (tomato ketchup)? :S x x x

    2 years ago
  35. I know that Italian food in the US is far spicier than it is in Italy, and that Italians consider Italian-American food its own thing, and not authentically Italian. Same thing with Mexican food. There is Mexican, and then there is Mexican-American (there is also Tex-mex). I think there is always going to be some fiddling with food outside of their native land. Yesterday I went to eat at a cool hipster-y restaurant, and they had pajeon with pork belly and Cole slaw. Not authentic for sure, but tasty!

    2 years ago
    • This isn’t supposed to say Italian food is spicier, it’s supposed to say “SAUCY-ER” or saucier, but I was writing on my phone with the stupid autocorrect. 11 hours later (oh, working life) I finally get to correct it. Now my mind is at ease.

      2 years ago
  36. we have corn on pizzas too!! I didn’t know that could be strange for anyone… :D Corn is so tasty!!!

    2 years ago
  37. First of all, I haven’t found ANY good Mexican food in Korea. Not even in Itaewan. It does not exist. Second, Indian food is way too expensive and mediocre here. Finally, that pizza place under your studio is amazing! It’s the best pizza I’ve found so far in Korea. Next, I’m going to try that new grilled cheese place in my neighborhood and see how it is. Now i’m hungry.

    2 years ago
    • The best Indian food I’ve ever had was at an Indian wedding. SO GREAT!

      2 years ago
    • Have you been to Vatos in Itaewon? It’s as close to anything I’ve ever had Mexican-y. There’s also a good place in Apgujeong that friends took us to, but I don’t remember the name of.

      2 years ago
      • Yes, I’ve been there and it comes the closest. BUT it’s not that good! I just miss Mexican food from California. It’s a good thing I’m in love with Korean food though since they make everything else too sweet! Haha

        2 years ago
  38. I know indian food tastes the same in Vancouver as it did in India…I’ve noticed that a lot of sushi places I’ve tried that had korean owners/chefs are sweeter?? than other japanse restaurants…odd

    2 years ago
    • ALSO YEAH THEY PUT SO MUCH SAUCE AND STUFF OVER THE ROLLS???? its like a sea of mustard on my sushi that im like….no….just….noooo

      2 years ago
      • yeah! I had something called “Rocky Mountain Sushi” at what turned out to be a Korean sushi place a couple of weeks ago in Toronto and MAN! It had layers of sliced jalapeno peppers and sweetened coconut on top of the salmon, it made me cry it was such a waste (and awful! so so awful!). Do they eat that in B.C.?

        2 years ago
        • Luckily the places I’ve been to outside of Vancouver have been only submerged in sauce…I’ve never had odd toppings before and this is the first time I’ve heard of putting coconut???? on sushi????that does sound awful

          2 years ago
      • Mustard… on sushi?! Yikes… they lather sweet chilli sauce on some here too (and call it spicy).

        2 years ago
  39. When you mentioned Italian food it reminded me of the Kdrama, “Pasta” (where they severe pickles with the pasta? You wha!?!?!) EDIT: Yep, okay pickles is a real thing that happens (Huh the more you know…)

    2 years ago
  40. I find koreanized food somewhat…special. I remember when I first saw your video for Korean Pizza and the thought of any cream cheese, sweet potato or cookie crust mind boggling. But ever since I have tried Korean French Pastries (minus the butter unfortunately) and Korean Chinese Food, I have began to love it! Great video guys!^^ Very insightful <3

    2 years ago
    • Oh man! I remember that video. We actually want to do another pizza video, because there’s…there’s just so much to talk about!

      2 years ago
      • The toppings were just as odd though…ribs? Sweet pumpkin? Oh no…however, the sweetcorn didn’t bother me as much as it seemed to bother you guys >.< We love sweetcorn on our pizza in England! I look forward to more FAPFAPs, and I would love to see an updated Pizza video! Also, Martina, is your hair pink again? Because I thought you dyed it other colours?

        2 years ago
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