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Reactions to Learning Korean Culture

September 8, 2011

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This week’s question is, how do Korean people react to us in Korea: more specifically, how do they react to us trying to partake in Korean Culture and the Korean Language? Do they approve, or do they find it insulting?

We’ve been in Korea for over three years now. As many of you can tell, we really love living in Korea and we’re having a great time here. From our experiences, we’re finding different reactions to different kinds of engagement with Korea. The first one we talk about is our engaging in Korean culture, which – all across the board – has been positive. Whenever we show our interest in Korea, and try to engage in Korean activities, we’re met with really warm and happy responses. We mention in the video our World Cup Soccer experience, which is – really – one of our fondest memories of Korea.

We were at the fried chicken restaurant, in a swarm of people all surrounding the TV. We wore red shirts, had the red devil horns and pitchforks. We had the stickers under our eyes. We cheered our guts out for Korea. When Korea scored, we screamed with everyone, jumped around, hugged and high fixed random people. We were just happy watching the game and rooting for Korea. Some people, though, were really touched by our passion towards the game, and bought us a lot of chicken and beer. They thanked us for cheering for Korea, and – I swear – we felt so close to Korea at that moment. We felt like we were a part of Korea, for that moment, and didn’t feel like outsiders at all.

Really, one of the most difficult things for us in Korea is the constant reminder of being foreigners, of being outsiders. We are not Korean. We don’t look Korean, as people constantly remind us when they point at us in the streets and say “Oh! Foreigners!” Even in a small elevator, people will talk about you as if you aren’t standing right beside them…even after you spoke to them in Korean. It’s really baffling. And so, after being reminded so often of being outsiders, that World Cup Soccer moment made us forget about that for a moment. And it’s really those times where we engage with Korean Culture that we feel a little more accepted here.

Speaking Korean, though, is a different story, and we have two different reactions to us speaking Korean. Most of the time, whenever we use whatever Korean we know, we’re met with “wow he speaks Korean very well!” or “wow your Korean is good!” Now, we know that this is not mean spirited. It just feels similar to those times that we’re pointed out in the streets as being foreigners. I think this is hard for us to explain fully without an example. Recently when we were walking Spudgy, we told a Korean couple (who were looking hesitantly at Spudgy) in Korea, “Don’t worry, he doesn’t bite! It’s okay to pet him” and the boyfriend turned to his girlfriend and said, “he speaks Korean very well” and we said, “Oh thank you” In Korean, and he once again turned to his girlfriend and said, “Oh they speak Korean very well.” Now, we totally know he wasn’t trying to be rude, but COME ON! We’re standing RIGHT THERE, and we can clearly understand you! He literally added nothing to the conversation except that point.

The result of this kind of reaction is a constant reminder of our distance from being a part of Korea. You remember our Korean Like a Pro segments? At the end, when we’re pointed out as being foreigners, and then complimented for speaking awkward Korean…yeah, that’s not really a joke, it’s really what happens.

Now for us, it’s not as bad because we only speak basic conversationally Korean, but for our friends who are planning to live permanently in Korea and speak Korean fluently, their intellectual conversation can be disregarded because it’s a foreigner saying them. Again, it’s not to say that foreigners aren’t allowed to have good points in a conversation. It’s more that their good points are lost in the surprise that people feel at hearing someone speak Korean well. It’s like, if you heard a toddler give you his position on James Joyce’s “Ulysses” and how it affected postmodernism, instead of listening to his points, you might be more amazed by the fact that the toddler made it through that book, let alone formed an opinion of it. And so it feels the same way for us.

The other experience we get from Korean people when we speak our little bits of Korean is simply the “well, why don’t you speak MORE Korean? Why don’t you speak it more fluently?” position, and this position can be held both by Koreans, and Korean speaking foreigners, with an air of disdain. Now, we don’t experience this all of the time, but we have experienced it enough that we feel that we need to comment on it.

But how can we comment on it? It annoys us. Yes, we don’t speak Korean fluently, and that’s been our choice. We’ve dedicated every free moment to making a video blog. Instead of learning Korean, we learned how to shoot and edit videos (seriously: have you seen our first videos? They’re TERRIBLE!). We learned how to code a website, and we spend a vast majority of our time trying to talk to different people online, respond to their comments and answer their emails. And, hey, we also taught full-time. Plus, when you’re a happily married couple, you don’t have that urgency to get out there and start talking Korean to meet a hot Korean guy or girl.

But, even if we didn’t run a website, even if we weren’t that busy, it’s still not fair to ask that of people. Some people just don’t want to learn languages, not out of stubbornness or out of a sense of elitism, but because – hey – maybe they don’t like learning languages. Maybe they’re not good at it. Maybe they like the experience of newness. Maybe they don’t have long term plans for Korea. Whatever that person’s reasons may be, we don’t think it’s fair to ask them why they haven’t learned how to speak Korean as if it’s a requirement that comes with every country you visit.

The only time we feel a bit upset at people for not learning Korean is when they EXPECT that people in Korea should all speak and understand English, and then they are upset when Korean people don’t understand them. That, we totally disagree with. If you’re expecting all Koreans to understand everything you say in English, and you refuse to learn any Korean, then we feel it’s right to ask you why you haven’t made the effort to try and compromise for the sake of communication.

Anyways, despite our few discomforts with living in Korea, we hope that most people can see that we really appreciate the eye opening experiences life in a foreign country has brought us. We wonder if other people have experienced similar feelings of “foreignness” here in Korea, or what their position is on learning a foreign language in a country that isn’t necessarily their home.

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Reactions to Learning Korean Culture

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  1. I always go into stores, markets, and restaurants with zeal and once I get up to the counter, am horribly reminded that I don’t speak Korean.  -_-

    But that won’t stop me!

    5 years ago
  2. isn’t it lovely panda???????????

    5 years ago
  3. to me, when i hear foreigner speacks korean, they looks soooo cute, and feel proud of our language.
    its kind of manner say “you speack Koran very good! ”  
    i’m living in AUS at the moment, sonetimes i heard same thing; “your english is good” but it feel like different with Korean. i think they said that, means “your english is better than that i thought”   anyway, you guys speck Korean sooo lovely~ especially Martina say Oppa~ kkk    have a good day:) 

    5 years ago
  4. Was the friend you were talking about on Running Man with you guys? Because I remember something exactly like that happening in the Nichkhun epi. (one of them). She was critiquing the food and she spoke to them fluently in Korean and they were all like’ WOW, You speak Korean really well’ right in the middle of her speech.

    P.S I was super stoked when I saw you on RM.

    5 years ago
  5. I first got interested in Korean culture because two of my best friends in high school were exchange students from Korea. I’m also very fascinated with languages and I would always ask them what certain words were in Korean, how to say some things, etc. What’s weird is that depending on who I asked they reacted very differently. 
    One girl would sit with me for twenty minutes happily correcting my pronunciation, while if I asked the other one, she would try to tell me once, then laugh at my attempt and change the subject. It was like she was uncomfortable having me “try out” her culture. So I think it really depends on the person and situation.
    BTW your videos are amazing, they have made me seriously consider teaching in Korea as well, keep up the good work!!

    5 years ago
  6. i find it really interesting that you guys experience this kind of thing, because i have a lot of friends who live in the US and get the same remarks. i live near san francisco and there it’s rare to hear some kind of “oh! you speak ______ really well” comment, because of how incredibly diverse the city is. but going out an hour or two into the other parts of the bay area means it gets a lot different. i have second generation mexican-american friends who will speak english to their customers at work and they’ll be told, “oh, your english is so good!” and it definitely IS patronizing, particularly when my friends were born and raised in america, speaking english all their lives. it surprises me that it happens in other countries too.

    5 years ago
  7. Hum… I went to a trip to argentine, and I can’t speak Spanish at all but because the language is a bit alike to mine (the sounds, words and all) we can understand what they say, we just can’t speak… but funny thing is, they make fun of us! We trying your best to be friendly and trying to speak in their language and all they told us was ”Next time come knowing the language, you need to learn our language before comming” WTH? And then started laughing and saying we should learn over and over again … since I understand their language but not when they speak too fast I asked the man to slow down a bit (he was a guide!)  And he said to me ”But I’m already speaking slow, more than this is impossible” and laughed in front of me, actually he was speaking pretty fast at times and confusing us… I believe he didn’t repeat again what he said when he asked him to, on purpose, because we should have to know their language…. It kinda of sucks…

    I think it’s rude the person laugh at you when you are trying to speak in their language… when you want to be friendly. Very rude.

    5 years ago
  8. Hum… I went to a trip to argentine, and I can’t speak Spanish at all but because the language is a bit alike to mine (the sounds, words and all) we can understand what they say, we just can’t speak… but funny thing is, they make fun of us! We trying your best to be friendly and trying to speak in their language and all they told us was ”Next time come knowing the language, you need to learn our language before comming” WTH? And then started laughing and saying we should learn over and over again … since I understand their language but not when they speak too fast I asked the man to slow down a bit (he was a guide!)  And he said to me ”But I’m already speaking slow, more than this is impossible” and laughed in front of me, actually he was speaking pretty fast at times and confusing us… I believe he didn’t repeat again what he said when he asked him to, on purpose, because we should have to know their language…. It kinda of sucks…

    I think it’s rude the person laugh at you when you are trying to speak in their language… when you want to be friendly. Very rude.

    5 years ago
  9. Hum… I went to a trip to argentine, and I can’t speak Spanish at all but because the language is a bit alike to mine (the sounds, words and all) we can understand what they say, we just can’t speak… but funny thing is, they make fun of us! We trying your best to be friendly and trying to speak in their language and all they told us was ”Next time come knowing the language, you need to learn our language before comming” WTH? And then started laughing and saying we should learn over and over again … since I understand their language but not when they speak too fast I asked the man to slow down a bit (he was a guide!)  And he said to me ”But I’m already speaking slow, more than this is impossible” and laughed in front of me, actually he was speaking pretty fast at times and confusing us… I believe he didn’t repeat again what he said when he asked him to, on purpose, because we should have to know their language…. It kinda of sucks…

    I think it’s rude the person laugh at you when you are trying to speak in their language… when you want to be friendly. Very rude.

    5 years ago
  10. Hum… I went to a trip to argentine, and I can’t speak Spanish at all but because the language is a bit alike to mine (the sounds, words and all) we can understand what they say, we just can’t speak… but funny thing is, they make fun of us! We trying your best to be friendly and trying to speak in their language and all they told us was ”Next time come knowing the language, you need to learn our language before comming” WTH? And then started laughing and saying we should learn over and over again … since I understand their language but not when they speak too fast I asked the man to slow down a bit (he was a guide!)  And he said to me ”But I’m already speaking slow, more than this is impossible” and laughed in front of me, actually he was speaking pretty fast at times and confusing us… I believe he didn’t repeat again what he said when he asked him to, on purpose, because we should have to know their language…. It kinda of sucks…

    I think it’s rude the person laugh at you when you are trying to speak in their language… when you want to be friendly. Very rude.

    5 years ago
  11. I had similar experiences in Japan, speaking Japanese. However, I learnt that if I follow a simple routine of “your Japanese is very good – oh no, I still have a lot to learn – oh, but it is – no, no, but thank you” the conversation usually goes back to where it was. Plus it only applies to people I meet for the first time. Do your Korean friends praise you for speaking Korean well whenever you open up your mouth? Now, that would be awkward…

    5 years ago
  12. I think it’s a common thing even between countries that speak the same language, I am from South America but moved to the caribbean and although I’ve been living here for half my life, when people find out I’m from another country they always comment on my accent (i.e. “Wow! really…but you don’t have the accent” <- Think American English vs Brittish English but with Spanish) My answer is always "I learned to speak in your accent to avoid getting pointed out like this".
    That's why when I watch Korean shows and someone starts speaking in Saturi, I can understand why  nobody really cares about what they are saying as much as they are amazed at the way it sounds.I guess we all just have to live with it…

    5 years ago
  13. I think it’s a common thing even between countries that speak the same language, I am from South America but moved to the caribbean and although I’ve been living here for half my life, when people find out I’m from another country they always comment on my accent (i.e. “Wow! really…but you don’t have the accent” <- Think American English vs Brittish English but with Spanish) My answer is always "I learned to speak in your accent to avoid getting pointed out like this".
    That's why when I watch Korean shows and someone starts speaking in Saturi, I can understand why  nobody really cares about what they are saying as much as they are amazed at the way it sounds.I guess we all just have to live with it…

    5 years ago
  14. I think it’s a common thing even between countries that speak the same language, I am from South America but moved to the caribbean and although I’ve been living here for half my life, when people find out I’m from another country they always comment on my accent (i.e. “Wow! really…but you don’t have the accent” <- Think American English vs Brittish English but with Spanish) My answer is always "I learned to speak in your accent to avoid getting pointed out like this".
    That's why when I watch Korean shows and someone starts speaking in Saturi, I can understand why  nobody really cares about what they are saying as much as they are amazed at the way it sounds.I guess we all just have to live with it…

    5 years ago
  15. *another note

    I guess you guys (simonandmartina) don’t understand what it is like when someone speaks your language because you guys speak english and almost everyone knows the language.(i said ALMOST everyone) It is when it is not one of the top 3 languages spoken that someone starts speaking in that people get surprised and are amazed.

    You guys feel that just because there are quite a few people who are foreigners living in Korea that do speak the language, most Koreans are aware that foreigners can speak the language but in reality, most people aren’t aware of that so when they do hear you korean, they are genuinly amazed.

    I am amazed when I hear african-americans speak spanish even though I know they could have learned it by the simple fact that they live in a city populated by spanish speakers. I am a “wow your Spanish is good” type of person lol

    5 years ago
  16. I guess that’s in any culture when a foreigner is joining in at events, but idk I am mexican-american and when foreigners start speaking the Spanish, at first it’s “oh wow you speak it well” but after it is alittle annoying. I really don’t know why but I suppose it is me secretly wanting Spanish to myself? like if more people can speak it, then your language is less unique? Idk

    It is also irritating when like the Koreans who work near the us/mexican border learn Spanish (not english) and they insult ME in SPANISH!! In MY language!!  It drives me nuts.

    But hey who wouldn’t want to learn a language? If it is being taught, learn. Besides, learning is free =)

    5 years ago
  17. The whole being surprised thing is one point that annoys me a tiny bit. It gets on my nerves when Koreans are always surprised to see KPop known around the world. I mean not like it’s huge everywhere but you will find fans in every country and Korean media/artists seem so surprised like they never thought their music/culture would be known outside of korea/asia. We live in a time of internet and news spread around in seconds. I just don’t get why they are being so surprised. I would understand it when it a few years back when the internet was still improving/in progress but now … it’s called globalisation~ Sorry for the rant :P

    5 years ago
  18. K.

    It’s the same in Japan. You can say the simplest thing in Japanese and the response is always, “WOW YOUR JAPANESE IS SO GOOD ZOMG HOW DID YOU EVER LEARN OUR MYSTICAL AND COMPLICATED LANGUAGE>@*(#&@&^# *head explodes*.” You get this and also, “Wow!! You use chopsticks very well!!! Better than me!! How did you learn to use chopsticks!!?!? HOW!?!? *head explodes again*”

    But you gotta take it all in stride. And like you guys said, it’s not malicious. Just ignorance, really. And North American’s are guilty of it too. “Oh you lived in China?” No, it was Japan. “Well same thing.”

    FALSE. -_-

    5 years ago
    • LOL OMG I totally get that when talking to my friends about South Korea. They’ll be like “Oh yeah, you said you wanted to move to Vietnam right?” And I’m like “No….. South Korea…..” *facepalm* And when I post K-Pop vids on Facebook, I know for a fact some of my friends think they’re Japanese vids lol

      4 years ago
  19. I’m a vampire too. D: Sun is ebil!!!!

    5 years ago
  20. This is very interesting because I’m a 1.5 gen Korean-Canadian immigrant, and I’ve experienced exactly the same reaction living here in Canada, especially in the early years.  Yes, the reminders are subtler and less frequent here, which is given since I live in Vancouver, where practically everyone’s a foreigner. In fact I had a born-and-raised-in-Vancouver-only friend who felt isolated since she wasn’t “from” anywhere like everyone else.

    Anyway, thanks for the very interesting and informative post, TLDR’s becoming my favourite segment.

    5 years ago
  21. This is very interesting because I’m a 1.5 gen Korean-Canadian immigrant, and I’ve experienced exactly the same reaction living here in Canada, especially in the early years.  Yes, the reminders are subtler and less frequent here, which is given since I live in Vancouver, where practically everyone’s a foreigner. In fact I had a born-and-raised-in-Vancouver-only friend who felt isolated since she wasn’t “from” anywhere like everyone else.

    Anyway, thanks for the very interesting and informative post, TLDR’s becoming my favourite segment.

    5 years ago
  22. Just wanted to say, from a Korean’s perspective, you guys are 100% right on this issue. I agree with you that Koreans, while not being malicious, tend to get very impressed when a non-Korean speaks their language even just a little. I guess it’s because Koreans are still not that used to having foreigners (I hate this term) living around them. So, my apologies on behalf of my race, if you were offended at all by our attitude. Keep up the good work, Martina and Simon! I’ve been watching your videos for quite awhile now, and I must say, you guys do really try to keep an objective voice. Thanks for all your hard work!!! 

    p.s. Has Spudgy been extra frisky lately? lol I’m just thinking it’s time he met a nice girlfriend…

    5 years ago
  23. Just wanted to say, from a Korean’s perspective, you guys are 100% right on this issue. I agree with you that Koreans, while not being malicious, tend to get very impressed when a non-Korean speaks their language even just a little. I guess it’s because Koreans are still not that used to having foreigners (I hate this term) living around them. So, my apologies on behalf of my race, if you were offended at all by our attitude. Keep up the good work, Martina and Simon! I’ve been watching your videos for quite awhile now, and I must say, you guys do really try to keep an objective voice. Thanks for all your hard work!!! 

    p.s. Has Spudgy been extra frisky lately? lol I’m just thinking it’s time he met a nice girlfriend…

    5 years ago
  24. As annoying as it can be to having the constant comments about how good you’re speaking Korean or how you should learn more.  It’s far better then being discriminated against because you’re not fluent. I’ve hear in France that they will ignore you if you don’t speak enough french to ask them in french.

    5 years ago
    • The worst thing about France is that they do speak English…but if you don’t make even a token effort at French they will pretend they don’t speak English and make you try to communicate the other way.  I’ve seen this happen SO many times to where I would walk up and be like, “Where are you trying to go?” while shooting the other person an evil eye. They just grin.  Granted I only have conversational French but that meant I never had to say more than a sentence before we switched to English.

      5 years ago
  25. Vic

    lol loved how it ended on the note of : Also known as a psychopath …. who wants to bet Simon editted this vid ? LOL 

    Apart from that I can understand how you feel.  I’m half viet and speak a lil bit of viet.  Cause I look so much more western viet people are like. Wow! your Vietnamese is good! all the time. 
    Then later they are like you should learn more…. >..<

    5 years ago
  26. Here in Vancouver there’s a large Korean population, especially where I live. At school you always hear Korean conversations in the halls and a lot of people (non-Koreans, but still mostly Asians) listen to K-Pop, watch K-Dramas, etc. – most people will at least know who SNSD and stuff are. But sometimes people still get surprised when they hear that I can read and write in Korean, and that I speak a little bit; even though there’s a lot of people who can because they listen to K-Pop and watch K-Dramas stuff. It’s happening less and less now that the Hallyu is spreading more though. But maybe because I haven’t tried lengthy conversations (and because I’m not actually in Korea) I haven’t gotten the “why don’t you learn more?” question. 

    Anyway, great episode this week! :D

    5 years ago
  27. Here in Vancouver there’s a large Korean population, especially where I live. At school you always hear Korean conversations in the halls and a lot of people (non-Koreans, but still mostly Asians) listen to K-Pop, watch K-Dramas, etc. – most people will at least know who SNSD and stuff are. But sometimes people still get surprised when they hear that I can read and write in Korean, and that I speak a little bit; even though there’s a lot of people who can because they listen to K-Pop and watch K-Dramas stuff. It’s happening less and less now that the Hallyu is spreading more though. But maybe because I haven’t tried lengthy conversations (and because I’m not actually in Korea) I haven’t gotten the “why don’t you learn more?” question. 

    Anyway, great episode this week! :D

    5 years ago
  28. Here in Vancouver there’s a large Korean population, especially where I live. At school you always hear Korean conversations in the halls and a lot of people (non-Koreans, but still mostly Asians) listen to K-Pop, watch K-Dramas, etc. – most people will at least know who SNSD and stuff are. But sometimes people still get surprised when they hear that I can read and write in Korean, and that I speak a little bit; even though there’s a lot of people who can because they listen to K-Pop and watch K-Dramas stuff. It’s happening less and less now that the Hallyu is spreading more though. But maybe because I haven’t tried lengthy conversations (and because I’m not actually in Korea) I haven’t gotten the “why don’t you learn more?” question. 

    Anyway, great episode this week! :D

    5 years ago
  29. this reflects my feeling as well

    5 years ago
  30. I can’t wait to move to Korea.  I have been diligently learning the language and have the opportunity to speak to other Koreans in America quite often.  The lady at the Bulgogi place I frequent has made the comment twice that I may be Irish on the outside but she’s convinced I’m FULL Korean on the inside.  Of course this is based on my use of the language when speaking to her, bringing my own Korean chopsticks and the fact that I am addicted to Korean foods (I have make Korean food at home at least 4 or 5 nights per week).  Some of my Korean friends have accused me of being ‘more Korean’ than they are!  LOL

    5 years ago
  31. I can’t wait to move to Korea.  I have been diligently learning the language and have the opportunity to speak to other Koreans in America quite often.  The lady at the Bulgogi place I frequent has made the comment twice that I may be Irish on the outside but she’s convinced I’m FULL Korean on the inside.  Of course this is based on my use of the language when speaking to her, bringing my own Korean chopsticks and the fact that I am addicted to Korean foods (I have make Korean food at home at least 4 or 5 nights per week).  Some of my Korean friends have accused me of being ‘more Korean’ than they are!  LOL

    5 years ago
  32. I had very similar experiences to what you described.  When I did anything cultural, my experiences were always fun & favourable (I had a similar World Cup experience in 2006).  Speaking Korean was mixed but generally very favourable – I used to get extra fruit in the market and good deals in Dongdaemun – but occasionally  someone would question why Korean wasn’t better.  It’s hard when your job is to speak English all the time.  But I loved my time in Korea and reading/watching your posts often bring back happy memories :)

    5 years ago
  33. When I was in Korea, I found that if I made an effort to learn about Korean culture or speak the language, people were very accepting and helpful.  They were surprised of course, mainly because I am not Korean,  but they were happy that I was trying.
    I find that when you travel to a country where the culture and language is different than yours, if you make an effort to learn about them, people treat you a lot differently.  They are more kind, accepting, and respectful.  You can not travel somewhere and NOT make an effort to learn about that country, your entire experience there will change once you start to know about their history, culture and language.
    My time in Korea was one of the best and I can’t wait until I can go back.

    5 years ago
  34. When I was in Korea, I found that if I made an effort to learn about Korean culture or speak the language, people were very accepting and helpful.  They were surprised of course, mainly because I am not Korean,  but they were happy that I was trying.
    I find that when you travel to a country where the culture and language is different than yours, if you make an effort to learn about them, people treat you a lot differently.  They are more kind, accepting, and respectful.  You can not travel somewhere and NOT make an effort to learn about that country, your entire experience there will change once you start to know about their history, culture and language.
    My time in Korea was one of the best and I can’t wait until I can go back.

    5 years ago
  35. I’m a lazy person but I love learning languages. I know Russian, Engish and I was studying Chinese and Japanese and now I’m learning Korean ^^ But because that I’m lazy I can’t learn it perfectly..and it’s killing me but I can’t do something about it… ^^

    5 years ago
  36. Omo, Simon was so (over-) hyped today..! I got scared at times ^^

    5 years ago
  37. Ok mb it’s because I’m not actually living in Korea (planning to do so tho) but am outside of it and am learning korean, but I have had a very different experience with speaking korean. I had a a korean women as a customer in cafeteria where I’m working and when I asked her where she’s from (just to confirm and not be rude by speaking korean when she’s not) and she asked me if I know where is Korea, and then i said to her in korean that i do know, and that i do speak a little bit of korean, and of course she was baffled and she was practically shouting in joy about how my korean is good and that she got goosebumps, but after that she did start to ask me if I know SNSD and say that i definitely should come to Korea and that I will really like it. And I had pretty much similar experiences when people tried to actually engage in a conversation and try to know me more. But once again mb it’s just because it was outside of Korea, mb if  it would happen in Korea they would be more demanding or treat me more as an outsider. I hope it’s going to be the same in Korea.

    5 years ago
    • Sometimes people in countries that don’t speak their native language get overexcited about hearing it due to familiarity and ease of use. I spent a while in Japan and, while my Japanese is good, it was always a bit of a relief to be able to speak in English since it’s easier to express myself.

      5 years ago
  38. Yay for more outside videos! :3

    5 years ago
  39. Yay for more outside videos! :3

    5 years ago
  40. Spudgy owl is the cutest thing ever. When are you going to sell plushies of him!?!

    5 years ago