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Why We Hate the Driving in Korea

November 1, 2012

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Time for us to say bad things about Korea! Oh, this is so worrisome. I know some netizen who has never seen the rest of our videos will stumble on this one only, and then think that we’re American pigs who hate Korea and should go back home if we hate it so much!!! (we get called American pigs a lot by angry Korean netizens, by the way…especially when we didn’t like some Korean traditional beverages). So, if you’re a Korean Netizen seeing us for the first time, let us say this:

Hello Korean Netizen! We do not hate Korea! We say lots of nice things about Korea and we like it here a lot! We just don’t like how you drive. That’s all! Please don’t be angry at us for thinking this, because we know you think this way too. Come on. Admit it. Loooveee youuu…Border

Ok, now that that’s off our chest, back to talking about driving in Korea. Now, we’ve talked a lot about it in the video, but I think this blog post might be best served with some diagrams of cool stuff we saw Korean drivers do. Check these out:

Figure 1: Bus driver wants to turn right, but the lane has other cars in it, so the bus drives around everyone by going to the left hand turn lane, then turning right, LIKE A BOSS! **Please note: I don’t think this is legal**

Bus turns right

Figure 2: Car wants to turn right, but there’s a car in the way, so he honks at the car in front of him. The car in front of him kindly gets out of the way, by pulling out in front of everyone at the intersection. Sucks if you’re trying to cross the street.

Honking

I don’t think you need any drawings for the rest of these, you can just picture them in your head.

3: Car driver wants a coffee, really bad. Decides to park on either the sideway or hazard on the road in front of the coffee shop, because, well, HE REALLY WANTS A COFFEE. There are TONS of side streets to hazard in, but that would be too far away, so it blocks up the whole intersection because people turing right can’t get buy him. Also, we’ve seen people stop RIGHT after they turn right and just hazard to let someone out, or pick someone up, and the cars behind are just leaning on their horns. Really inconsiderate.

4: Cars are stopped at the red light, but there aren’t a lot of cars driving the other way, so why not creep forward a whole lot, until you’re sticking out right on the crosswalk. They’ll just keep on creepin’ till they finally say “screw it! I’m already half way there!” and they just run the red at a slow speed.

5: There’s a red light in front of the driver, but slowing down sucks, so forget slowing down. Just blow through the red. Really, I almost got smoked by a van like this before. Whizzed right in front of me, just a few feet away from destroying me. No honking, no slowing down, no apology. Just near death experience, I was really shaken up.

Sure, driving isn’t like this for EVERYONE. There are drivers who obey the law and don’t try to run you over. If you’re Korean and one of those drivers, then bless your soul! Otherwise, we’ve experienced so much bad driving that we’re really extra cautious every time we cross the streets in Korea now. Seriously, when people talk about safety in Korea, we’re not worried about crime, and we’re not in the least bit worried about North Korea. Our only fear: drivers trying to murder us.

We asked our Korean friends about what getting a driver’s license is like here, and they’re like, “you just fill out a paper test and then you get your license.” WAHHHAT?? !! THAT’S IT!!! I really REALLY hope this has changed over the past four years we’ve lived here, because that would seriously explain a lot about the driving. A car is a HUGE METAL WEAPON! You have to learn how to wield it! In Ontario (where we are from in Canada) you have to take first take Driver’s Education which doesn’t even involve a car, it’s just being lectured about driving. Then you have three levels (G1, G2, G) you have to go through just to get your final license, and all those require six months to one year of practice before you can even apply for the next level. AND you’re not allowed to drive without a real license holder (who had it for at least four years) in the car with you, AND you’re not allowed on the highways until you’re at the next level! Most people fail their very first driver’s test to get to the first level because there is so much pressure to do everything perfectly. They test your basic driving, parking uphill, downhill, and parallel parking, looking around and checking all your mirrors, how to drive on a one way street, and so on. Once you want to apply for your next level, you have another test where they see how you drive on the highway, can you merge, do you pick up enough speed, and so on. And if you want to drive a motorcycle or scooter, there are completely different licenses and tests you have to take, including a safety class on how to fall properly if you wipe out! I really think Korea needs to start applying more serious tests for their driving or start handing out really expensive tickets and dock points off someone’s license so that they can lose it and start taking running over pedestrians seriously. How about in your country? What is the driving like and do you feel safe as a pedestrian?

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Why We Hate the Driving in Korea

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  1. I can imagine how it is, sounds like my parents country, Pakistan. There is like no concept of indicators, and separate car lanes! Like there’s a road, and as many cars that can fit in there trying to squeeze in, and then there motorcyclists (which usually have a frickin’ five people on them) trying to squeeze in., it looks like a puzzle. I also thought that when I heard about Nichkhun and Daesung’s car accidents, cause I know how motorcyclists are around that area.

    7 years ago
  2. I was in a Korean taxi once…never again I shall take one…

    7 years ago
  3. Hey Simon and Martina. :D
    That’s crazy insane that they just have to take a paper test and then receive their licenses!! Here in California, we have to take drivers education. Once we’ve completed drivers education, then we can take the written test for our permit. Once we have our permit, we have to take at least 3 drivers training classes, drive a a minimum amount of hours, and then we can take our driving test. However, if you’re 18: you don’t have to worry about drivers ed or training…you can just take your permit test, and then if you pass you can start practicing how to drive before you take your driving test. And if you want to drive a scooter, a motorcycle, or a semi-truck: there are other classes you have to go to and take tests for. As a pedestrian: I feel mostly safe. As a driver: people need to get off their phones and pay attention!! We even have a “hands-free” law where we aren’t allowed to be on our phones, and yet people still do it anyways.
    Sorry for talking so much. Thanks for listening. Keep up the amazing work!! :D

    7 years ago
  4. I saw this video the other day and thought about you guys, and tada it is the topic of today’s TL:DR

    http://youtu.be/sYT829yhSrg

    7 years ago
  5. when you lay it out like that, it really does sound hard! Just got my G license! YAY and i never failed any of the tests :D

    7 years ago
  6. I love Martina’s shirt :D <3

    7 years ago
  7. Just a paper test??! Here in Australia you have to drive 120 hours (and that’s only day time hours) before you can go sit a test to get your actual license. There’s rumours that it might even increase to 240 hours TT

    If those crazy drivers drove in Australia, they would be completely bankrupt from all the fines..

    7 years ago
    • I’m on my L’s right now and really it’s just money for petrol giants OTL. I feel that drivers suddenly get bad when they become P-platers and just hate everyone haha.

      Australian fining is just too easy to get away with though! Where there are speed cameras, THERE ARE SIGNS SAYING THEY’RE THERE. I just thing it defeats the purpose of having speed cameras and everyone slowing down just at them and speeding before/after them. :/ How I love this upside down country dearly.

      7 years ago
      • Haha, quite true actually x)
        I’m also on my Ls and I get heaps of hate from others when I drive the speed limit == (hence why I have to admit that I do speed at times)

        Though I think that the fact that jaywalking is somewhat safe (in that the probability of surviving is significantly higher than in Korea) to do here kinda shows that our roads, and I guess our speeding, aren’t that bad :)

        7 years ago
  8. I’ve lived in Korea for two years and trust me, this video was too nice. The kind of driving that goes on in Korea is incredibly dangerous and I have had way too many near-death experiences; especially when we consider that I don’t own a car in Korea. So this means I’ve been either a passenger or a pedestrian in every case!

    Last weekend I saw a pretty terrible scooter accident. Luckily, the guy was wearing a helmet and I really hope he was okay but I wasn’t wrong in assuming that it was his. He pulled on to the street going the wrong direction, without lights on, at night. WTFFFF?! I just want to scream and pull my hair out.

    I agree with what Martina said; it’s like nothing is sacred. I’ve seen elderly people as well as obviously pregnant women (sometimes with toddlers in tow) go flying down the bus aisles because the driver (who saw them get on!) guns it as soon as the door is shut.

    It just shouldn’t be happening. There are laws in Korea… in fact, they’re very similar to laws in North America, but the difference is nobody seems to care and there is nobody enforcing them. A scooter blew past my elementary school doing no less than 80 mph, I looked around and sure enough there is a police officer, on a motorcycle, still chilling at the light. I will never understand. Sorry about the rant but I just couldn’t agree more. I love Korea, I love my Korean friends and co-workers but this is the #1 worst thing about living here.

    7 years ago
  9. in the Philippines, we have the same problem (I think its worse)

    7 years ago
    • Oh yea, our buses would also weave through traffic (like scooters) and if they hit someone or something, the bus driver would escape. Its common knowledge that buses who’ve hit people would make sure that their dead as its cheaper to pay the small compensation to the bereaved family than pay the hospital bills if the victim survives. Buses here are also notorious in gunning it (I have personally experienced body slamming the front panel of the bus when it suddenly hit the breaks…and apparently, it was my fault) T_T. Light signals, pedestrian lanes and foot bridges are merely suggestions, just cross when you feel like it (Fear Factor!). Commuters would hail and alight anywhere, buses and taxis would let you off in the middle of the road, motorbikes/scooters would also weave through stop lights. We have a high mortality rate due to bus and/or scooter accidents. We also have bikes and motorbikes with a side car (they are used for commuting in the alleyways/side streets); they are notorious in going the opposite direction in a 1 way street and they will run you over for sure (and it will be the pedestrian’s fault).

      I really hate to think that this is a cultural thing…but…arrrrgh! T_T

      7 years ago
  10. The US’s steps to getting a driver’s lisence are pretty much the same as in Canada. We also needed 50 hours of driving experience with an experienced driver in the passenger seat. You could opt out of driver’s ed, but then you needed 100 hours of driving experience before they would let you anywhere near the actual test. Then there’s a written test and finally the actual driving test.

    But oh man, I know what you mean about those bus drivers and scooter drivers! One of my friends told me that the other day, she saw a bus hit a scooter driver and then drive off! He didn’t even slow down like “Oh God, I just hit a human being!” So the guy was laying in the middle of the road, injured and unable to move and behind the bus was a taxi driver, who sat there honking at the guy for not moving. I cannot believe the lack of respect for human life in Korea, when it comes to driving! D:

    7 years ago
  11. I remember you saying how bad driving is in Korea so I was prepared for havoc when I went this summer. Maybe it was because I had gone into Korea from China but I was wondering what you guys were saying since I felt like Korean driving wasn’t bad at all x3 The only thing was that there’s traffic like ALL THE TIME. O____O (But yea, here’s a fun story of driving in China. When I was there this summer we hadn’t reserved a place to stay since we know our way around china, but there are like these people who stand around in the airport advertising their hotels and stuff [which isn’t all that safe… following strangers when you think about it, but ehh] and then we basically fit like 14 people into a minivan without seats and the driver also going insanely fast weaving through the lanes, sometimes going on the opposite lane, and also going into the sidewalk when there was traffic both ways >.>) So if you guys have such a problem with the driving in Korea… I don’t think you guys would be able to enjoy china if you ever decided to visit.

    7 years ago
  12. I live in Ohio. Here, if you’re under 18, you have to take a written test to get your learners permit (you can do this at 15). Once you have your learner’s permit you have to take a driver’s ed course with instructor driving time. Once you have the paperwork from that and have been driving for a certain amount of time, you can take the driving portion. Here the driving portion consists of a maneuverability test http://www.publicsafety.ohio.gov/img/bmv_maneuv_diagram.jpg and then the street portion. Where I am that meant driving around the block, but the DMV is on the corner of two of busiest streets for us, so it isn’t super easy, no traffic driving. For those over 18, you aren’t required to have any drivers education. You only have to have had your learners permit for a certain amount of time before you take the driving test. I had to take drivers ed anyway… because I needed the instructor time in order to pass the freaking maneuverability test…

    as for the learners permit and who could be in the car with you, the passenger just has to be a licensed driver 18 years or older.

    7 years ago
  13. About the thingy majigger that said that China is worse at driving than Korea- 100% true! I went to Korea this summer and I just thought it was bad. We actually accidentally hit a girl (not hard. We were going like 5 miles an hour. Enough to shock her a bit). Then I went to China thinking it would be the same. Goodness… While we were there, we repeating went to this food stand chain thing. Not because the food was good or that the prices were reasonable, but because there was no way cars could drive between our hotel and the food! (It was blocked off) lots of people had the same idea, because that place was crowded!! I had to shield my mother, who despite being Vietnamese and living in an Asian country for many years, walked the streets of China without a care it the world. And she tells me I walk to carelessly >.>

    Thoughts? Haha

    7 years ago
  14. I remember traffic in China, whenever we crossed the street, we went over these land bridges that crossed to the other side of the street, seemed much safer than traffic lights. Seat belts seemed to be a nuisance to people too.
    I also remember not being able to find a seat on a bus, and having to hold on super tight to the bars, not that I really went anywhere on the bus since it was so packed.
    Ahhh, fun times.

    7 years ago
  15. So what you’re saying is, when it comes to driving, Korea and North America do a Freaky Friday style switch where the Koreans are all, “Meh, good enough.” and the North Americans are all, “You must be perfect!”

    7 years ago
    • actually… yeah, it really is. “Freaky Friday,” that’s a perfect analogy actually, lol. I think I already commented somewhere else that I think Simon and Martina’s statement exaggerates a tad bit, but at the same time, I refuse to drive in Korea, whereas I’ve had 5 cars so far in the States, so take from that what you will. However, I didn’t notice the rampant ignorance of “red lights” from pedestrians that S&M did. I mean… have you been to China? You could be in the ritziest, most cultured place, and “not a single fuck was given that day,” lol.

      7 years ago
  16. kap

    omg. I visited Cambodia over the summer and discovered that there is indeed a place that has worse driving than in Korea. The previous year I lived in Seoul for six months and thought I would never experience such terror on the streets.. but the driving in Cambodia makes Korean driving look perfect. >.< now that I'm back in the states, I glare at anyone that complains about bad drivers. wha~? bad drivers here? pssha!

    7 years ago
  17. In Pakistan, they just started using lights, and people just take them as suggestions. My uncle told me that the government had just passed a law that required the driver to wear a seat belt (this was about 3-4 years ago). Some of the old cars don’t even have seat belts! I discovered that when I visited when I was 12 and my brother and I knew that your always supposed to wear a seat belt (since we were raised in the US). But when we climbed into our uncle’s car, we asked him and our cousins where they were, and they just looked surprised and said that nobody wore seatbelts. It seemed completely normal to ride along without anything strapping you in safely. I remember one time we went to McDonald’s, and my cousins’ cousins were also going, so we all piled into one car. There were about 6-9 kids in the backseat (by the way this is a 4 x 4 car) and about 2-3 people in the passenger’s seat. Only the driver get’s his own seat, sometimes with a kid in their lap as well. The only way we could all fit was because we were little. I was only 12. But I’ve always been physically bigger than my cousins so I always had people sit on me. My cousins are very skinny and frail-looking and short while I actually have some meat on my bones and don’t look like I can be snapped in half by a breeze. Of course they eat fine, so I guess it’s got to do with the nutrition we grew up eating, along with the difference in location in environment. Now, I have to say MOST of my family obeys the traffic laws, but some people they have to deal with on the street don’t. For example, in a busy intersection during a traffic jam, by aunt gave the left signal so she could move in on a open spot in the next lane, a driver from SOMEWHERE sees this and quickly jerks his car into the spot, scratching along my aunt’s completely brand new car that she got a few months earlier.Now, after he gets into the spot, he gets out and looks at his car to check for damages. Of course, HIS car is fine while my aunt’s car’s paint gets sheared off. She says that he would have come out and tried to fight if his car got damaged even if it was all his fault. He didn’t even give any signal and just squished is car into that spot. I think I was more angry than my aunt cause I know I might’ve socked him in the face if he did that to me.

    7 years ago
  18. New Zealand driving rules are so strict compared to the Korean rules. It takes almost 3 years to get a full driving license here (if you don’t fail any tests.) The government decided to make it more difficult last year too! Now >50% fail the tests regularly… And our driving isn’t that bad relative to your view of Korean driving… I’ve never seen anything like you guys have seen.

    7 years ago
  19. Found it funny how surprised you were by drivers in Korea. Ignoring red lights? Driving on sidewalks? It’s a daily routine in Russia. People don’t even pay attention to this here anymore. It’s smth children are tought before they can walk: eat you vegies, look out for crazy drivers! If there’s 100% that it’s safe to cross the road – means there’s 200% a car or a bus will appear out of nowhere!

    7 years ago
  20. I want to know your impressions of K-dramas for the next TL:DR. How did you get to know them in the first place? Why do you like them? What does Simon thinks of them? Have you guys recommended some to your non-Koreans friends?

    Greetings from Canada!

    7 years ago
  21. Once a friend and i wanted to go to Paju, to visit a friend and another friend offered to drive us there. I’ve never been this scared in my whole life. also there were a few occasions when we where almost knocked over by those stupid scooters…agreed, Korea is dangerous, traffic-wise

    7 years ago
  22. Sometimes, there are idiots who try to kill you, but generally I ALWAYS run across the street if I see a car coming. I was almost run over by an ambulance that came speeding down a residential street WITHOUT their light or siren on. One more thing, oh my goodness it is so complicated to get your license in Canadia, here in the US…PA to be specific…you need a learners permit for 6 months to a year if you are under 18. If you are older than 18 you need your learners permit then you can test for your license 24 hours later I believe. I’m 21 and I need to get my permit to get my license by the end of Sept. 2013. The driving manual make learning how to drive sound like performing brain surgery, it makes to sound like the tiniest mistake is the end of the world. Sorry I rambled for a bit.

    7 years ago
  23. How old do you have to be to get a driving license in Korea?

    7 years ago
  24. I also live in America the States to be exact, the law is to take a written exam and driving exam you have three chances to pass the driving exam if you fail you must wait 6moths maybe a year to once again start the process all over again. That is if you are an adult. As for 16 year olds you also have a written exam if you pass you get a permit. The permit allows you to drive a car along with license holder (experience driver 4 years min). You must complete a certain amount of driving time to qualify to take the driving exam. License to minors come with restrictions. And like in Canada if you want to drive another type of vehicle it means you have other classes to take before getting your license.

    7 years ago
    • Oh as for my neighbor to south, Mexico. My mother land, well it’s pretty much sink or swim situation like S.Korea. You better get out of their way if you want to survive. Whenever I visit my sisters in Mexico City my brother-in-laws always insist that I take the car. If I do I never make it past the parking lot. I rather use public trans and run from the cars.

      7 years ago
  25. Australian (Queensland) drivers licenses take forever

    You have to be sixteen and a half to get your learners which consists of a written test of twenty questions and ten. You’re allowed to get three wrong in total (2 on twenty and 1 on 10) otherwise you have to return the next day.
    When you finally have your learners you have to have it for a year and clock up 100 hundred hours of all condition driving (of which you have to record in a booklet) and also three drive school lessons. Your learners takes two years to expire.
    Then to get your P’s (provisionals) you do a practical test. If you pass that you’re on P plates for three years (two for the red and one for the green? or vice versa).
    After all that you go onto your full license.

    The above process annoys me to no end because when my dad got his license 48 years ago the police tested you and the that tested my dad told him to drive around the block. When he came back *BAM!* license.

    I’m still on my learners although I only went for them last year.

    7 years ago
  26. OH BOY! I have been waiting to rant about this for the longest time! :P

    So, to starts off, California driving. Now, when people think California driving, they think horrible traffic, speeding cars that cut in front of you. Thats Los Angeles driving, and you know what, its not that bad :D haha. Its funny to have friends come from San Diego or Northern California and say that driving in Los Angeles is really scary for them, which, compared to San Diego and Northern Cali, it is. But………its NOTHING, let me repeat, NOTHING! compared to China. Going to China made me understand why Chinese drive so bad lol (I am chinese, so, there is no racism intended for other asians out there)
    Seriously, as a passenger and as a pedestrian, I thought I was going to die.

    Scenario number 1: I am walking down the street, and I know that pedestrians do not have the right of way, so I don’t act like it. So I carefully walk across the street, but even before the cross, a PARKED car, in the PARKING ONLY SECTION drives to get out of traffic and nearly kills me…because, in your head, you’re thinking “okay, I don’t want to get killed by moving cars, so walking carefully across the street” but no, who knew that a parked car would also try to kill me! LOL

    Scenario 2: A family friend of ours is driving us to a national park and the drive is roughly 8 hours. It is in Si Chuan where the big earthquake occurred so a lot of the streets are still in construction….so of course, there is a lot of traffic. Our driver has been driving for 5 hours already and he is tired. So…he doesnt want to wait in traffic so he decides to drive on the other side of the road….which is okay, but its not okay when the other side of the road also has traffic and he is driving in the center of the road to cut everybody off….and what happens when there isnt enough room in the center?…well, He simply honks his horn like a maniac to tell the people on the other side of the road to move over. LOL…..where is a Martina doodle when I need one…

    FIN

    7 years ago
  27. Well that explains a lot…
    And I thought drivers here in South Florida were bad… I’m counting my blessings now.
    u_u No driving test?! You have no idea how much that horrifies me…..

    7 years ago
  28. Traffic signs are merely a suggestion in this country not law. I nearly get hit every morning walking to school. I cross at cross walks but cars still have the right of away apparently along with everything else…

    7 years ago
  29. I don’t know if anyone has said in the US, but I had to take Driver’s Ed and that was a regular class I took at my high school. We had an instructor and it was a 1 hour class five days a week for a semester. You did bookwork (like the signs on a highway, rules for town driving, any random stuff) but you also had to do actual driving lessons with you behind the wheel, your partner person in the back and your instructor in the passenger’s seat (you would switch off with your partner like halfway through) and you did something like that for a 2 hour block and at least like 3 or 4 times in the semester. Once you pass the class, you can go get your license but depending on your age, you might have restrictions but that’s mostly for people who are under 18 (child labor laws). Everywhere in the US is different too depending on state. I’m from DE but MD you have to take classes plus you have to put in a certain amount of hours of driving with adult supervision, but I think that’s because they don’t have as much one-on-one instruction as DE has. But everything changes! Who knows. I got my license like 8 years ago so it could be totally different now.

    Oh, and the illustrations are awesome. LIKE A BOSS!! Though I can imagine that would be a moment where you stop and are like… did that just happen??

    7 years ago
  30. I guess from the sunglasses that Martina is doing better than Simon… ^__^

    7 years ago
  31. Sounds like driving is pretty bad in Korea, but I’m pretty sure it’s MUUUCH worse in India! Indian drivers can boast of having done all that you have mentioned above and MOOOORE. Plus, on Indian roads, you have the dreaded scooters, as well as even-more dreaded three wheelers (or auto-rikshaws) which are great for a relatively cheaper means of transport than taxis, but will creep into the tiniest space imaginable on the road such that they might as well get into the backseat of one of the cars. And along with all this, in quite a few places, you will also have the pleasure of having to dodge all kinds of animals on the road, cows and stray dogs mostly, but other varieties of species may also pop up to surprise you depending on the area!

    Hehe, just thought I’d give you a fair warning in case you were planning to go to India any time soon (Hopefully I haven’t scared you away,,,). Besides the driving, India is really a wonderful and fascinating place to visit!

    7 years ago
  32. Sounds scary! I’ll definitely keep this in mind when I visit!

    I have a question about Korea! So I know that Korean men have to be enlisted to the army, even celebrities like Leeteuk, so I was wondering if you guys could talk about why Koreans HAVE TO get enlisted and what happens if they refuse to go — like maybe because their religion does not support it or so..? What happens? Do they have the option to do something to else to serve the Korean community or will they be imprisoned or something crazy like that?

    Got curious because I was thinking about how a lot of my favorite celebrities have been enlisted to the army and then everyone is sad about it… :(

    Anyways THANKS IN ADVANCE! :)

    7 years ago
    • You HAVE to go sans any medical reasons. What major religions hasn’t killed millions? You’ll be laughed out of any court, then branded as a coward by the whole of society. You HAVE to go. And Korea is the second deadliest military to go to after Israel’s, so yeah, it’s pretty hardcore.

      7 years ago
  33. Hey a looong time ago you said that you were going to do a separate video on manners and the way you are supposed to behave while eating and drinking with others. Howe about doing that now ? :D

    7 years ago
  34. Did you know that in most dramas driving scenes, the car is actually on top of a truck? XD

    7 years ago
    • My friend and I were actually sitting at a bus stop when a car & truck shooting for a drama ran by us. It was funny, since they all turned toward us (since my friend was dark-skinned, so it was a bit eye-catching). It was some middle-aged actors I didn’t recognize, the entire film crew in front of the car on the truck bed, and the passenger guy in the truck. I think the truck driver was a bit too annoyed at missing the light to look. But it was pretty funny…

      7 years ago
      • Oh so cool! :0 LOL he should have just turned back and checked XD – I think its heelarious when they do that, I reckon it might be a bit dangerous/hard to film otherwise, but still. XD

        7 years ago
    • What do you mean by that? I don’t really understand…

      7 years ago
      • The car is on top of a towing truck, the truck drives around with the car on top of it to make it look like the actors are driving :P

        7 years ago
    • That’s like all car scenes everywhere. haha.

      7 years ago
  35. In YouTube the user MrRoadWorrier (not warrior) has left 7 videos full of examples about how drivers drive in South Korea… in the case you’re curious

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kajEy8Yt-0o

    7 years ago
  36. Dear Simon and Martina,
    With the presidential election coming up, do majority of Koreans pay attention to American politics? Or do they just don’t care like how they are with red lights? If they do which candidate (or political parties) do you see them supporting? Have your political views changed by living in Korea?

    7 years ago
  37. I guess Korea has a lot in common with Poland :D And I thought Polish drivers are the worst hehe :D

    7 years ago
  38. I am glad to come from a Central American country where, like Thailand and China, you have to fight your way through traffic :) As little kids, we grew up crossing the streets in between buses and cars, so going to Korea would be like going back home! XD – Police are also non-existence and you can very easily bribe yourself out of a ticket, we can ride anywhere on a car and babies can ‘drive’ on mom/dad’s lap. Now, I know how unsafe it is, but there is SO MUCH FREEEEEDOMMMMM! I miss it all now that I live in the US. It astounds me to see 10, yes, 10 years olds NOT move when they see me pulling into the driveway >> they even run infront of the car back and forth like nothing. Pisses me off, Ive had to save my little cousin from death a few times as well, little shit always runs in parking lots..and shes 11 >>. FREAK!- Its TOO easy in America.Thats for sure :)

    7 years ago
  39. I didn’t have any problems in Japan when crossing the road or inside cars. They seem to obey traffic laws at all times.

    When I visited Japan for the first time our tour group used a large bus to get us around Tokyo. On one outing, the traffic light suddenly turned red and our bus driver stopped in time, but ended up on the crosswalk. Unfortunately this particular intersection had a police officer stationed at its koubansho or “police box”. So what did the police officer do? He got out a stick and start walking around our tour bus hitting it. I could hear the police officer cursing in Japanese. And our bus driver in response looked very embarrassed and kept bowing.

    7 years ago
  40. So guys, you never have been driving in other Asian countries. Well since I live in the Philippines, and I drive through the city every time, whatever you described as some of the worse things in Korea, is just a typical thing here, especially in Manila. That thing the bus did, I see it every day here. Though here if you want to have a driver’s license you take a written and a practical test, you can “weave” through it. So I hope you survive it there! You’ll learn how to do “defensive” driving in time. Haha. =)

    7 years ago