Go Premium
Facebook Twitter Google Plus

Korean Bakeries and Kpop Cafes

February 11, 2015

Comments

Share Post

Oh man. This week’s TL;DR was a difficult one for us to do. Bread: it’s so important to us, and we didn’t know how much we missed it until we started living in Korea. Bread: it’s something that’s become so trendy in Korea, but something that’s still not done right, by our standards. But those are just our standards. I wonder if Korean people go overseas and eat bread and thing “gross! This is too savoury!” Hmmm. That’s something I’d love to know!

You know what’s surprising, though? We don’t have this complaint in Japan. The bakeries we went to in Japan were AMAZING. They all use butter, SO MUCH BUTTER! Korea…doesn’t really use butter. Korean croissants are really dry and sad. We had the second best croissant of our lives in Tokyo, in fact. You could count all the folded over layers, and it was so moist and baaaaagggghh it was divine. The best croissant we ever had, believe it or not, was in Amsterdam, at a bakery that was close to our AirBNB. Paris had disappointing croissants, oddly, from the places we visited. Maybe we just didn’t find the right places? Point is, Japan and Korea are similar in many ways, but we infinitely prefer Japan’s baking culture to Korea’s, and I don’t know how they got to be so different.

Something else that interests us in Paris Baguette’s attempt at expansion. It’s even opened up a location in, get this, Paris, but French people find Paris Baguette awful. Paris Baguette doesn’t offer French food, but Korean people who have never experienced French food don’t know that. If any of you watched Bugs Bunny back in the day, you might remember that hasenpfeffer episode, in which the king demands hasenpfeffer, and Bugs Bunny gives him a carrot, which the king happily eats, while thinking that it’s hasenpfeffer and not knowing that it isn’t. Just like how people think they’re eating Japanese sushi when they eat California Rolls, Paris Baguette has made an entire industry off of this same premise. It’s marketed to Korean people as an authentic French experience, with it being called “Paris Baguette” and with logos including the Eiffel Tower in it.

So why would Paris Baguette open up a location in Paris? Our guess: advertising, that’s why. Paris Baguette isn’t the only Korean bakery pretending to be French. Tons of others have donned French names in order to appear to be French. Hell, even today we went past a Korean bakery that sells Korean baked goods, yet it calls itself Malmaison, and has French written all over its sign. So what will make Paris Baguette stand out from the many imposters of the original imposter? Well, Paris Baguette now has a bakery in Paris, that’s what! How many others can say the same?

Oh man: there’s so much to say about Paris Baguette. Read their official brochure, and how they distribute the freshest of frozen dough. HOW THE HELL IS FROZEN DOUGH FRESH? Am I not up to date with baking standards and practices? If a company makes all the dough in a factory, freezes it, and then ships it out to stores where they can be defrosted and then baked, THAT’S NOT FRESH! Paris Baguette is to French Bakeries what Hot Pockets are to Italian Calzones. You’re a microwave dinner, Paris Baguette.

OK ENOUGH RANTING. There’s hope for us in Korea, still! We’ve definitely started finding more bakeries lately that cater to our sensibilities than before. We remember when Home Plus starting selling bread when we first came to Korea, and how surprised we were. Even though it wasn’t what we were expecting, we were still excited. But now we’ve got places in Seoul that we can go to when the going gets tough. Here are a few:

Publique

For those of you who have been following us for a while, you might remember the video we did in Fell & Cole for awesome ice cream in Hongdae. Well, right on the same street leading up to Fell & Cole (one of our favourite areas of Hongdae) is Publique. HOLY CRAP! I just remembered an older video we did ages ago, before we started doing WANKs, in which we were exploring Hongdae and we actually went to Publique. Well, there you go. Two videos that show you the area Publique is in, and one in which we actually enter Publique. Whoa: that video was way before we had the Eatyourkimchi Studio. So odd!

Anyhow, Publique is a reliable go-to shop for us whenever we need bread. Sure, it’s pricy, but some days we need a good, crusty loaf, and they do it right. You can find it here on Google Maps. It’s close to the studio as well. Yay!

Paul and Paulina

This one is a lot easier to go to when you’re in Hongdae. If you’re at the top of the hill that leads up to the university, and you’re looking at the university, turn left. It’s on the side street that Starbucks is on (and the new Paris Baguette, speaking of which). A few steps down that side street and you’ll see Paul & Paulina. It serves good croissants and nice loaves of bread, though the prices aren’t for the faint of heart. That doesn’t stop it from having huge lines most of the time we go there, though! Still, if you really need some bread, this place is a safe bet for you :D

The Bakers Table

We don’t go to Itaewon often. Most of the time it’s for vet appointments for Meemers, but whenever we do go, we stop by The Bakers Table to pick up bread. They’ve got lots of great loaves there. It’s also a restaurant, and serves some pretty wicked sandwiches, that we sometimes sit for as well, but it seems like every time we go it’s crazy packed, so we just pick up a couple of loaves and go back on our way. You get more bread for your buck here than you do in the first two locations as well. Check em out on Facebook

So, yeah, that’s it for our bread sources. If you’re living in Korea and have some that you go to, PLEASE SHARE! We need to stick together on this! Otherwise, we’d love to know what bread culture is like where you’re from, and if you felt picky about the bread when you visited other places. Anyone else try bakeries in both Korea and Japan and feel the same way? Let us know!

Lastly, I’m sure comments will pop up now like “Oh! Simon and Martina make fun of Korean bread without knowing how to cook in Korean fluently,” which we’ll respond by saying “yeah, we cook Korean food, too, all the time” but then they’ll respond by saying “yeah, but you do so with terrible accents seasoning. You have to be able to cook Korean food perfectly before you can talk about Korea making non-Korean food!” I’m sure :D

Comments

159

Share Post

TL;DR

HIDE COMMENTS

Korean Bakeries and Kpop Cafes

159 COMMENTS

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  1. French nasty here, and I will say something highly polemic – I think it’s sometimes hard to find good bread in France.

    Let me explain. I grew up in a small town in the country side (some might call it a village, but I insist of calling it a town!) and the bread and pastries there were wonderful. Later on, I had to move to a bigger city (a proper city this time^^) for my studies and stayed here to live, and most of the bread I’ve bought here wasn’t up to my standards(and don’t get me started on croissants and chocolatines). I think the reason is that a lot of chains have been settling there too, and a lot of the bread and pastries are either made from frozen batter or just made somewhere else, frozen, then sold in bakeries (even in small ones). I even remember buying a croissant in Tesco when I was living in the UK and being shocked at how ”normal” it tasted to me when I’d expected it to be disgusting. This doesn’t sound right…

    Now mind me I think this will not be the case everywhere in France. As I said, the bread in the countryside I grew up in is gorgeous, and I am pretty sure this is the case in many other places as well. Maybe just a countryside vs cities kind of thing ;D

    5 years ago
  2. When I was living in Korea, I was in this TINY town which was basically just built up around a university. There was basically nothing there except restaurants, yet there was a Tous les Jours AS WELL as a Paris Baguette… right across the street from one another! I missed bread so much… ㅠㅠㅠㅠ I never got anything from either of those bakeries that really got my attention…

    5 years ago
  3. Why don’t you guys make your own bread? It’s really not hard at all. Idk bout the availability of wheat flour in Korea but I’m sure you could order it! Heck even bread machines are pretty great. My dad used to pop in the dough(box mixes even!) at night and by the next morning we’d have fresh baked bread for sandwiches
    I just had a bagel for breakfast and the grocery store within walking distance of my house has pretty damn good croissants…. Bread is my everything

    5 years ago
    • Ovens are not usually a part of a standard Korean kitchen but the bread machine is a good alternative. I would suspect that if they wanted a bread machine they would have to import it anyway.

      5 years ago
  4. talking about ‘robot legs’ ;) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jA8inmHhx8c

    5 years ago
  5. I’d die without fresh bread _french here _ haha, that’s the food I miss the most when going to foreign countries ^^

    And here’s a question for TL:DR :
    I talked with a chinese exchange studient about the one-child policy in china a few days ago (cause I didn’t know much about it, so that was the occasion to ask) and I was a little shocked to hear about the consequences of this policy. I was wondering if there were any policy, law, etc. that would be considered extreme/making non-sense in foreign countries (or even to koreans)?
    Bye ! :D

    5 years ago
  6. My mom co-owns a Chinese bakery (and before you ask, no she is not the baker. She deals with the financial, hiring, and supplies). We are also known for being one of the best Chinese bakeries in Vancouver for egg tarts. So, I’ll discuss our bakery as well as being a southern Chinese:

    Bread must be soft. SUPER soft and well, fluffy, but not too fluffy. Wonder Bread and that other stuff from the store are to coarse and too dry. Ours are soft and fluffy because the head baker has trained in Japan for baking. There are buns with savoury fillings like egg, ham, cheese, bbq pork, tuna, etc. But we do have some sweet fillings like blueberry cream. Ours are known for NOT getting hard the next day. They will still remain soft and fluffy.

    Occasionally we will head to the giant Hmart, and buy breads from their bakery. We go because we want some sweet thing from them that we know we will never do at the bakery. (I partook in pastry tasting where we sample potential new products. We are out of the sample phase) The Korean bakery in Hmart has some delicious sweets. Especially their cream filled things…

    5 years ago
  7. In most parts of India, bread is not associated with a main meal. Sure, lots of people eat bread as part of their breakfast or as a snack (toast, sandwiches, etc) but it’s never associated with like a proper lunch or dinner. And though most people eat rotis/parathas/chapatis with meals, flatbread and bread are considered two very different things. Bread in India would be pav (like a burger bun. Pav is part of several common Indian street-food snacks like vada-pav, pav-bhaji, omlette pav, etc) or like a brun or something. Or packaged loaf bread. My foreigner friends find it very frustrating that European or North American style types of bread are not readily available in India. If they are, they are in fancy, expensive bakeries in big cities. I had never heard of a bagel till I was 15 years old and someone mentioned it on an episode of the OC (the show was broadcast on TV here almost three years after its American broadcast). It was another four years before I even tried one. India is becoming more globalized with various types of foreign food coming into the market now.

    5 years ago
  8. As a French person who grew up in Canada, I can say that bread, especially like the traditional baguette, is not as good there as it is in France. However, it is probably not as bad as what I already expect to find when I’ll go to Korea and judg-I mean try (n_n’) Tous Les Jours or Paris Baguette.
    When I came back to France, I actually found an even bigger difference in terms of taste and quality in the pastries. In Canada, you can find French pastries like éclairs, mille-feuilles or croissants and pains au chocolat, but they don’t taste nearly as good as the ones in France. But there are other yummy things in Canada that I miss.
    When it comes to croissant, I understand why you said that most of the ones you tried in Paris weren’t that good. I find that, although a croissant is the most basic french pastry, it’s getting harder and harder to find really good ones. For instance, the ones sold at the closest bakery to my home are not very good; I have to go to another bakery just a bit further to find croissants that are not as heavy and actually taste good.

    Fun fact – but you might have heard it before: in France, a bakery can only be called bakery (“boulangerie”) if the products are made from scratch.

    When I found out that Paris Baguette was opening in Paris, I didn’t quite understand why that Korean chain would come here to kinda ‘compete’ with actual French bakeries haha. Like I said, I don’t expect their products to fit my and other people’s “European” taste nor to be the least bit similar to real French pastries, so their decision to do their thing here seemed weird. I wonder how they are doing now…

    Well, on that note, I’m off to go eat some bread haha.

    5 years ago
    • Are you perhaps a Montreal nasty? ^^

      5 years ago
      • Omg sorry I just saw your reply! Yes, well yes and no, I’m French and Canadian! I used to live in/near Montréal but now I live in France! n_n

        5 years ago
  9. I am from the States but good bread is allusive because of a wheat allergy. I have a blood test to confirm it so don’t ask”Are you sure?”. There are more options in the prepackaged food department because of the gluten free diet fad but as for fresh baked forget about it. How would one with food allergies navigate Korea? There is a lot of rice flour but do they mix it with wheat flour? And I would guess it would be the fillings that would get you in the end. Curse you, Soy Sauce! Is gluten free on the radar in Korea? If I ever get a chance to visit it would be nice not to live off of rice and fruit. Martina, looks like you are just going to have to learn to make bread. ;)

    5 years ago
  10. The UK has pretty good bakeries, but Gregg’s is the biggest franchise I can think of aside from supermarket’s.
    Here in the west of Scotland, we also get Aulds, but I don’t really like their stuff (The pies are so greasy and the strawberry tarts are headache sweet.).
    A friend of mine’s dad is a baker and refuses to make bread any more, because it doesn’t sell. Most people here in the UK seem to be content with just buying a ready sliced, limp loaf from the local corner shop.

    5 years ago
    • I find it saddening that real bakers are losing the touch and passion to bake because society are being so lazy and want everything pre-cut or pre-prep in a box. I want to see more fresh bake goods, but it’s so hard to find a place for that. There are times where I have to travel great distance for a good pastry.

      5 years ago
  11. Oh man. I feel you guys so much. I miss my grandmother’s homemade bread daily. It’s like no other bread I’ve tasted.

    I definitely agree with Paris Baguette. It’s also ridiculously over priced and people pay for the silly brand name. Instead of PB, I have been going to the chain Indoven recently for their loafs of bread and pretty good baguettes.

    Have you visited the French Village (서래마을) near Express Bus Terminal? It’s a short street filled with authentic bakeries and wonderful small restaurants. Very few foreigners here in Korea know about it so it would be fun to see a FAPFAP. :)

    5 years ago
    • We’ve heard about it, and read about it, but haven’t actually gone yet. We’ve read…mixed reactions, and I’m worried if we go we’ll be disappointed. Hmm…

      5 years ago
      • It really is dissapointing. I remember going to the french village and I didn’t get much of a french vibe at all. Not that the area wasn’t nice. I just think you have to search hard to find the best places. I don’t think the area itself is bad to visit but I think if you expect to get an experience of landing in a french street, you are not going to get it.

        5 years ago
  12. Oh gosh, I’m glad you did a TL;DR on bakeries because I love freshly baked bread, even if I don’t get it all the time. I’m from the US, but I have lived abroad in and visited several countries, specifically Germany and Senegal and one of the main things I miss about those places is eating freshly baked goods daily.

    When we were in Senegal, we had always have a fresh loaf of French bread that I would use to eat with mangoes and bananas and it was CHEAP! You can get French and Italian bread in America, but it’s very hard to get it fresh out of the oven. In addition, there were boulangeries and patisseries EVERYWHERE! Some had better quality than others, but I loved tasting their take on common French baked goods.

    Just talking of this just reminds me how much I miss the cakes that Senegal had. All the patisseries had French cakes that you just can’t find in the US unless you’re in a big city. I was craving a chocolate one like the one here http://skyehohmann.photoshelter.com/img/pixel.gif on the right. I wanted something like that for my birthday back in December and while I had a nice, rich chocolate cake, I was really craving that French cake :)

    5 years ago
  13. Honestly bakeries as “bread baking place” are rare here in Latvia, but you can still get freshly baked bread because we don’t freeze bread here at all. The large factories bake them on the spot and then distribute them to smaller shops or supermarkets. Considering how popular rye and sweet-and-bitter bread is here, I’m guessing those can’t actually be frozen at all. And many supermarkets have their own bakeries in them so you can get freshly baked pastries anywhere. There are lots of pastry shops, I have no clue how they get their produce but most I’ve been to make their own. That said, getting bread from the shop located at the bread factory is the best.

    5 years ago
  14. I’m an American, but I’ve tried the bread in both Japan and Korea. I definitely agree that Japan has a great selection of breads. Between private owned bakeries, and chains (like Vie De France and Pompadour) there are tons of options to choose from! I’m a sweets person myself, but it’s nice to have the option of more savory breads. Also, many bakeries in Japan discount their bread after a certain time in the afternoon, so you can load up on all the bready goodness!

    One thing I’ve noticed in Japan is the inclusion of “French Toast” at bakeries. Usually it looks like an extra wide slice of white bread (think 2 – 3 inches or more), cut on the diagonal, and coated with a sugary topping. I’m not sure exactly how it qualifies as “French toast” but it is DE-LI-CIOUS!

    As far as Korean bakeries, I also agree that Paris Baguette was not very impressive. However I LOVED Paris Croissant! Their lunch (and brunch!) options were all great in my opinion. That being said, I never went to Paris Croissant just for a loaf of bread, but the bread used on their sandwiches was really good!

    5 years ago
  15. STEAMPUNk!!!! ♥_♥

    5 years ago
  16. This video is pure gold! Aaah, Korea and their ‘bread’. :D

    As a Norwegian with our dense bread that could knock someone unconscious, it was quite a culture shock to come to Korea. Both me and my fiancé is that stereotypical Norwegian that eats bread for every single meal except dinner. We went to so many bakeries to find a type of bread that’s similar to home that I lost count. Light and fluffy bread will mess up most Scandinavian’s digestion in the blink of an eye, and you want to avoid that at all cost when on a ‘romantic holiday’. I thought we had hit jackpot when we found Paris Baguette, only to be met by… CAKES and other pastry. Excatly where have they hidden their baguettes? I just remember taking two steps inside, shaking my head and turning on my heel with a huge NOPE! Haha.

    After a few days of searching and grumpy stomachs from too much rice we stumbled upon ‘Long Bread Sandwich Bar’, an orcanic café that serves traditional panini and sandwiches, located at the corner of Lotte Young Plaza in Myeongdong. They (supposedly) make their own bread, soup, dressing sauce, pesto and we even watched them press orange juice. It was like coming home. Or to heaven… All depending on the state of how distressed our digestion system was. We ate breakfast there every day for the rest of our stay. :’)

    http://i.imgur.com/TACrlvd.jpg

    5 years ago
  17. I have the explanation about the disapoiting croissant in Paris…Sadly in France bakeries use more and more oil instead of butter in croissants…economics matters…BUT if you search carefully there is some of them wich still use butter (easier to find in britany)! And then the croissants are…OMG! :)

    5 years ago
  18. I LOVE how many in-depth bread comments I am seeing right now :’)

    5 years ago
  19. I’m American but I’ve been living in Norway for the past 3 1/2 years, and although there’s definitely that really dense bread that Martina talked about, I feel like there’s plenty of bread that’s similar to what I grew up with in the US. What I do miss are all the desserts, and all of the distinct names we have for them. In Norway, most desserts fall into the category of kaker (cakes), kjeks (crackers/crisp cookies), or muffins. This works for Norwegian desserts, but there’s been a huge influx of American desserts like cupcakes and chocolate chip cookies. I work at a bakery and I constantly hear customers (and even my co-workers and boss who’s an educated baker) call cupcakes “muffins” and refer to chocolate chip cookies as “cakes.” But seriously, I miss dark chocolaty cupcakes with American buttercream frosting… Mmmmm…

    5 years ago
  20. Bread culture here in Germany is very big, in fact there are more than 300 varieties of bread ( I don’t think that this even includes bread rolls). At a normal bakery you can get everything from white bread, french baguettes to really dark rye bread made with sourdough, sunflower seed bread and my personal favourite Pumpernickel (seriously, try it, it’s great with Nutella or cheese). German bread culture is even about to be made UNESCO world heritage.
    I already get withdrawal symptoms when I’m on vacation in Italy, so there is no way I would survive without my savoury, savoury bread in Korea.

    5 years ago
    • You’re totally right! Being a German it is so hard to get decent bread in many other countries. For me and my particular taste in bread even buying bread in Austria, where I study, is difficult. They don’t have bad bread, theirs is just a little different (I believe it is often with quite a lot rye…I’m not absolutely sure, though).
      After what Simon and Martina said I suppose a German trying to get good bread in Korea for the first time would end up crying on the floor of a bakery.

      5 years ago
  21. BREAD. HO HO HO LET ME TELL YOU HOW DIFFERENT IT IS /WITHIN/ AMERICA. Leigh can probably back me up too when I say this~ TEXAS BREAD SPOILED ME ROTTEN. I’m from Houston, TX and I loved bread here soooo much it’s the best. Then I moved to Seattle, Washington. [insert horror movie music] Dear fucking goodness; bread there was SO DAMN GROSS. I kept tryin and trying and no regular sandwhich bread was good. NOTHING. Then I found ONE store (ONLY 1!!!) that sold Wonderbread and like you said, it’s not the best; but compared to the other terrible shit I was surrounded by, mmmmm it was satisfying enough. It got to a point where I actually just stopped eating bread (except for like italian/french bread loafs and subway and burgers) while living there. When I moved back to TX, I found the bread hella delicious again, but I’m still so traumatized from the bread in Washington State that I can barely eat it anymore. (I’m slowly recovering from NBT -Nasty Bread Trauma-).

    So there u go, bread even within the USA varies and it’s so sad. (FYI Everything is yummier in TX)

    on the other hand, I’m also hispanic/mexican so I also eat alot of Mexican bread (like the sweet bread) and eh…. it’s only good when you eat it fresh. if you wait to eat it like for an hour or so, it get hard and dry– thats when i end up only eating the top of the bread, stripping it of it’s sweetness and i leave the rest to sadness.

    bread. who knew it was so powerful.

    5 years ago
    • This makes me sad to hear. I was born and raised in Oregon, not too far from Seattle, and I’ve always found the bread to be exceptional. That being said, I know that regional tastes can be very different. Oregon prefers heartier, more seed and nut based breads. Dave’s Killer Bread is a great example. My favorite is The Good Seed. All of his breads are made with organic ingredients and no artificial ingredients. The difference, once you taste it, is astounding. But, I like denser, more nutty breads. My time living in Ireland spoiled me for that. You haven’t had a bread that will put meat on your ribs until you try Irish Brown Bread…and that stuff is hella chocked full of fiber too! I still miss it.

      5 years ago
    • I grew up in Oregon, and there were always these loaves in the store called “Texas Toast.” Maybe that would be more similar to what you’re used to? I’ve never made it out to Texas so I don’t know how similar it would actually be. It’s what Oregonians think they serve in Texas, any way. ;)

      5 years ago
      • Texas Toast usually has garlic salt and cheese on it…it is sort of like the “Texas” version of garlic cheese bread. Don’t know how authentically Texan it is. I’ve been to Austin, Texas a few times, but I can’t say I can recall eating Texas Toast there (aside from the frozen prepackaged kind) or any regional bread that blew my mind…but then, the people I was visiting weren’t the most culinarily advanced…

        5 years ago
        • I saw quite a few that weren’t covered in cheese or garlic. I never bought any, but they just looked like extra thick slices of white bread. And Dave’s Killer Bread is awesome! :D

          5 years ago
  22. In Denmark we have this thing called rugbrød (rye bread according to the dictonary haha) (http://www.honningkagehuset.dk/media/wysiwyg/rugbroed1.png) and it’s almost like impossible to find REAL rye bread anywhere except for denmark. It’s probably possible to find it in either Sweden, Norway or Germany, but it’s really still not the same. It doesn’t really have the same texture or taste. There is something special about rye bread :’) Once my friend even told me it was only health fanatics who ate rye bread in the US, but here in Denmark we eat it on a daily basis~

    For bakeries in Denmark we really have some good ones. I think the most well known bakery in Denmark is Lagkagehuset. They have some great stuff, but it’s sooo expensive..
    My local baker is called La Baguette and it’s actually really really great! They have some great pastries :’) and their bread is great too~

    5 years ago
  23. It’s been a long time since I’ve been to Canada so can’t remember what bread is like there but I find American bread to be way too sweet!

    I live in a city in the UK which is filled with franchises and supermarkets but work in a small and very traditional village outside the city.

    The village has a few amazing bakeries, I’ll never get baked goods from a supermarket again!

    5 years ago
  24. Bread. Le sigh…

    I left Korea about 10 years ago, but I’ll never forget waking up to slices of white bread with butter “flavour” like Mee or I’m Baker. I invariably got unpleasant heartburn within an hour.

    One day after a long day of teaching, I popped into a bakery for a quick snack to get me home on my hour-long commute. I was looking for anything that didn’t have sausage or cherries in it. I settled on garlic bread. How could you go wrong with garlic bread? Well, I took a bite and felt something gritty on the underside. It was dusted in sugar. Eeewwww…

    I arrived in Seoul having come from downtown Montreal where there are plenty of fine bakeries. I must admit I didn’t find much in Seoul to satisfy my bread cravings. One time I picked up a bag of mussels from the market and headed to Paris Baguette to get some baguette for dipping. The woman who served me started slicing the loaf before putting it in the bag. STOP!! Why are you doing that?

    I have to agree with you on bakeries in Japan. I remember arriving in train stations and immediately picking up on the smell of real butter in the air. It was very welcoming.

    All told, I did grow to like a few offerings in Korean bakeries such as choux crème/cream puffs even though the cream was questionable. I also enjoyed the croquettes for a snack. Whenever I pop over to Vancouver, I try to get some from a Korean bakery. We had one in Victoria for a while, but it didn’t catch on with the locals. Wonder why?

    5 years ago
  25. everything you said sounds exactly what the state of bread is like in Shanghai… I was surprised to see bakeries everywhere, there are at least three in our street but they’re all chains often with French-ish names like Croissant de France or something, we have Paris Baguette too… but like you said, they’re not really bakeries to me, more like cake shops I guess, I love Paris Baguette’s steamed chestnut cake…
    I did find two bakeries that sell authentic European style bread, a German one and an Austrian one, so now occasionally I buy “real” bread although it’s more expensive, I don’t miss bread everyday but sometimes I do crave it, now if only I could get some proper cheese to eat with my bread… *sigh*

    back home in Germany I remember that there were lots of individually owned bakeries everywhere when I was younger but about ten years ago most of them closed because of bakery chains in supermarkets, it’s a shame because there is definitely less diversity now, everything is kind of the same and you don’t have that one bakery that makes the most amazing pretzels anymore and that other bakery that makes the best rye bread and so on :(

    …now I’m craving Apfeltaschen…

    5 years ago
  26. As an unsuspecting European living in Shanghai, you could only imagine my despair when for the first time I unwittingly went to a Paris Baguette and foolishly thought that I was choosing a selection of both sweet and savoury pastries. NO! It’s not to say that the pastries there aren’t tasty (but sweet garlic toast was certainly an experience) but there’s a real lack of European style bread readily available. Which is fine, because I’m not in Europe any more, but it’s the initial shock to the system like “Now what am I gonna eat for breakfast?”.

    So I’ve just stopped eating bread, basically. There are days I long for a loaf that isn’t sugary, I miss baguette, tiger, crusty, ciabatta, focaccia, muffuletta – BREAD, I’LL NEVER TAKE YOU FOR GRANTED AGAIN. There’s an Italian restaurant down the street that has LEGIT Italian products and bread. But it’s pricey :( We have the French Concession here in Shanghai so I’d like to think somewhere there has European style pastries, but I don’t want to travel 60 minutes there and back just for a coffee and croissant. I can survive until I get back home haha.

    5 years ago
    • I think “French” Concession is a purely historical term, I haven’t found any particularly French things there but I’m not exactly an expert so who knows…
      I don’t know about Italian bread but if you want German/Austrian break check out this http://www.abendbrot.com.cn/ they even deliver to some areas of Shanghai, not where I live though :( or go to Haubi’s Bakery at Xintiandi Style in the supermarket on the lowest level

      also, are you interested in possibly meeting another expat Nasty in Shanghai?

      5 years ago
      • I would indeed be interested in meeting another expat Nasty :D Yay friendship! Thank you for the link! I haven’t been to the former French Concession yet but I have a classmate who lives there and their apartment has an oven so naturally I assumed they had more bread in that area haha o.O

        5 years ago
  27. Jax

    I’m German, so….pretty much all the bread I’ve ever tasted whenever abroad varied between disgusting and barely edible. ;)
    Most of the time the flour is waaay too white, more like what I’d use for pastries, etc and there are absolutely no varieties.
    When I go to a bakery in German I have a gazillion options when it comes to bread, especially when it’s a bakery selling organic food and I miss that whenever I’m visiting another country.

    I never went to a Korean bakery to get bread, because it looked more like sweets, but I was also disappointed with their cakes (Paris Baguette). They look sooo good, but I tasted a few and they were all very dry despite looking like they had a lot of cream and/or chocolate/fruits.

    5 years ago
  28. I grew up in Florida in the US and we had this amazing German bread bakery that I would always get my loaves from. I bring it up because the guy who owns it and makes all the bread is like a seventh generation meisterbacker or masterbaker. There’s even a fancy certificate on the wall of the bakery! So I guess you could say he’s a certified masterbaker from a long line of masterbakers.

    Okay, I will stop with the terrible masterbaker puns.

    If I ever come to South Korea I promise I will bake you a nice fluffy loaf of challah, free of charge. No one should ever be without sandwich bread. I’m pretty sure that’s like a crime in the US.

    5 years ago
  29. I’m french and I never thought that I would miss bread and cheese so much until I spent a few months abroad… I guess that being homesick makes you appreciate more what you are used to eat without thinking about it :) but indeed French people often feel that foreign countries can’t make real bread, for example italien bread is not salty enough! I can’t imagine how korean’s french bread tastes like^^

    5 years ago
  30. Hi there
    Im from Slovakia, near the capital, Bratislava (so i can talk only for people living on the west, near the capital)
    When I was younger (Yes i know thats been like 10 years ago -.- dont judge me) there was an awesome traditional Slovak-Hungarian baker in out small village!!! One just had to wake up, get on the bike or have a morning walk and you could get back home with super fresh steamy buns and breads, kneaded by the baker himself like at 3AM just for you!
    …But, he had to close down. A lot of small bakeries had to close down due to the overwhelming market of Tesco, Kaufland, Lidle and such stuff. I dont mean to complain about them cause they make they make the bakery fresh and traditionally but… you know what i mean -.-
    You just dont get that huge variety of pastries and bread that those small bakeries have/had. Oh dear spaghetti monster, how i wish i could have a good old “Bosniak” again >..<)

    Although i grieve after those good old bakeries and savory breads, i do have to mention a positive trend thats happening in Bratislava.
    Awesome, new, stylish, themed coffee shops that care for coffee with so much care! And they have been popping out everywhere like mushrooms after a rain day! I seriously cant find enough time to go to all of them! And a lot of them work together with at-home bakers, which cant afford to have their own small bussiness, and create traditional or funky desert and pastries for their coffee shops <3

    I need opportunities/excuses to go to coffee shops -.-

    5 years ago
  31. I remember the first time I went to a korean bakery in my country, I was happy until I saw that they didn’t have any bread… just sweets and cake… if most of korean bakeries are like this… I really feel bad for you!! lol

    I went to Australia for 1 month and I missed bread soooo much!! It’s just wasn’t the same… I had to go to a chinese bakery, it’s the only one that had bread with a similar flavour to chilean bread lol (and it was only 1 month xD)

    5 years ago
  32. can’t agree more Simon and Martina! I was in Korea from Aug-Dec 2014, was staying in Seogyo-dong, at Hapjeong station exit 9 area (superb neighbourhood!) There was this really nice bakery that served fresh bakes – i know cos the bakers are seen in the kitchen kneading the dough and nice buttery smells come out of the shop which I can smell from the entrance to the street. But it was so sad that the shop closed in end Nov and I dun think it’s just rare that I witness a closure of a small business in matter of 3 months but it’s just quite common across Korea now that conglomerates or big franchise chains are swallowing these small but good eateries, losing the unique flavours of the neighbourhood esp Hongdae which has such vibrant cultures. :( I dun think my landlord even knows that her favorite bakery closed down since she lives in Gangnam!

    5 years ago
  33. I’m really suprised to see that you like Japanese bread this much. I’m from Europe, living in Tokyo for almost two years now, and I was really disappointed by the quality of bread here. The pastries are good, I admit, but most of the regular, savoury breads taste like sadness. Fluffy, sticky sadness. But maybe it’s just because it’s so different from the bread I’m used to eating in my country.

    5 years ago
    • See, I think it might be because you came to Tokyo straight from Europe, while we’ve been living in Korea for a while before visiting Tokyo. While you went from perfect bread to ok bread, we went from bad to better. Maybe that’s it?

      5 years ago
  34. Hi there Ghozalie from Morocco. i am a big fan.

    When i was living in Canada, i found the bread too sweet and it has to many ingredient in comparison, with Moroccan bread. So I ended making it at home instead :)

    I wish all the best for you guys and keep on the videos specially the FAPFAP. :)

    Cheers
    Ghozalie

    5 years ago
    • I’m from the US and that’s something I noticed too have noticed about American bread/baked goods when I was in Senegal for 10 months. Actually, now that I think of it, a lot of things in America are extremely sweet. No wonder sugar addiction is such a common thing for us.

      5 years ago
  35. I CAN’T UNSEE SIMON’S BOOGERS FOR THE WHOLE VIDEO Dx
    And simon, what BB cream do you use? I asked in another video but I didn’t get a reply ;_;

    5 years ago
    • Also if someone could help me find a suitable bb cream… the perfect color would be between missha perfect cover #23 and #27… wish there was a #25. 23 is wayyy too pale for me and I like the yellow undertone from 27 a lot more but it is also slightly darker than my skin tone so it looks like i’m tanned lol… Can anyone recommend a yellow undertoned bb cream that isn’t too yellow/tan Thanks!!

      5 years ago
  36. So far haven’t been to any Paris Baguette yet haha but Tous Les Jours instead. btw can you do a tl;dr on how tourists/foreigners can use or gain access to mobile service/phones in korea? im going there on march and it ‘s really interesting to know, thank you!

    5 years ago
    • Hey! I’m going there on march as well, i’m gonna be really lonely so I hope I can make some friends in advance lol are you gonna stay in seoul?

      5 years ago
    • I am staying here for 9 months, so I had to get a new phone number and data. It was the worst experience so far here.
      At least for longer stays the phone company brand “Olleh” started selling pre-paid stuff. It works ok, but you really need a korean speaking person to help with the translating and general fuss. It took 1.5 hours to get it done. -_-
      The rates are fair enough, so that’s not so bad.
      I’m sorry I can’t help you better, but if you find yourself a local (or more experienced foreigner) you’ll be fine.

      5 years ago
    • Tous Les Jours is another sad place to go to for bread. Or their bread here in the Philippines is waaay too oily. And dry.

      5 years ago
    • im interested on this too, please do S&M :)

      5 years ago
  37. Korean bakeries are spreading to Malaysia as well. There’s already 2 Tous Les Jours here.
    .___.

    5 years ago
  38. Oh this is so bad, I’ve been living in Paris Baguette, since there is one right next to my university. : X

    5 years ago
  39. can you get wheat flour in korea? or is just expensive? you can easily make your own bread if you can get the right ingredients.

    5 years ago
    • Yes baking your own bread is easy enough and you don’t need too many ingredients to make good bread. If you get a bread machine it can do most of the work for you.

      5 years ago
  40. You shouldn’t talk until you’ve tasted the glutenfree bread.

    ALL the glutenfree bread. (Which means you only have to taste one sort because it all tastes the same.

    5 years ago
    • Where do you come from? I worked in a gluten-free webshop (glutenvrijemarkt.com , yes i do shameless selfpromotion). Anyway, it is Dutch, but we had this new (English) brand called Genious which was quite alright. I don’t have to eat glutenfree, but I had a fair share of glutenfree breads which sucked. The Genious bread however is pretty good, it actually reminded me of bread instead of sand and deserts.

      The only thing I dislike about the bread is that name… makes me cringe every time.

      5 years ago