Go Premium
Facebook Twitter Google Plus

Korean Bakeries and Kpop Cafes

February 11, 2015

Comments

Share Post

Oh man. This week’s TL;DR was a difficult one for us to do. Bread: it’s so important to us, and we didn’t know how much we missed it until we started living in Korea. Bread: it’s something that’s become so trendy in Korea, but something that’s still not done right, by our standards. But those are just our standards. I wonder if Korean people go overseas and eat bread and thing “gross! This is too savoury!” Hmmm. That’s something I’d love to know!

You know what’s surprising, though? We don’t have this complaint in Japan. The bakeries we went to in Japan were AMAZING. They all use butter, SO MUCH BUTTER! Korea…doesn’t really use butter. Korean croissants are really dry and sad. We had the second best croissant of our lives in Tokyo, in fact. You could count all the folded over layers, and it was so moist and baaaaagggghh it was divine. The best croissant we ever had, believe it or not, was in Amsterdam, at a bakery that was close to our AirBNB. Paris had disappointing croissants, oddly, from the places we visited. Maybe we just didn’t find the right places? Point is, Japan and Korea are similar in many ways, but we infinitely prefer Japan’s baking culture to Korea’s, and I don’t know how they got to be so different.

Something else that interests us in Paris Baguette’s attempt at expansion. It’s even opened up a location in, get this, Paris, but French people find Paris Baguette awful. Paris Baguette doesn’t offer French food, but Korean people who have never experienced French food don’t know that. If any of you watched Bugs Bunny back in the day, you might remember that hasenpfeffer episode, in which the king demands hasenpfeffer, and Bugs Bunny gives him a carrot, which the king happily eats, while thinking that it’s hasenpfeffer and not knowing that it isn’t. Just like how people think they’re eating Japanese sushi when they eat California Rolls, Paris Baguette has made an entire industry off of this same premise. It’s marketed to Korean people as an authentic French experience, with it being called “Paris Baguette” and with logos including the Eiffel Tower in it.

So why would Paris Baguette open up a location in Paris? Our guess: advertising, that’s why. Paris Baguette isn’t the only Korean bakery pretending to be French. Tons of others have donned French names in order to appear to be French. Hell, even today we went past a Korean bakery that sells Korean baked goods, yet it calls itself Malmaison, and has French written all over its sign. So what will make Paris Baguette stand out from the many imposters of the original imposter? Well, Paris Baguette now has a bakery in Paris, that’s what! How many others can say the same?

Oh man: there’s so much to say about Paris Baguette. Read their official brochure, and how they distribute the freshest of frozen dough. HOW THE HELL IS FROZEN DOUGH FRESH? Am I not up to date with baking standards and practices? If a company makes all the dough in a factory, freezes it, and then ships it out to stores where they can be defrosted and then baked, THAT’S NOT FRESH! Paris Baguette is to French Bakeries what Hot Pockets are to Italian Calzones. You’re a microwave dinner, Paris Baguette.

OK ENOUGH RANTING. There’s hope for us in Korea, still! We’ve definitely started finding more bakeries lately that cater to our sensibilities than before. We remember when Home Plus starting selling bread when we first came to Korea, and how surprised we were. Even though it wasn’t what we were expecting, we were still excited. But now we’ve got places in Seoul that we can go to when the going gets tough. Here are a few:

Publique

For those of you who have been following us for a while, you might remember the video we did in Fell & Cole for awesome ice cream in Hongdae. Well, right on the same street leading up to Fell & Cole (one of our favourite areas of Hongdae) is Publique. HOLY CRAP! I just remembered an older video we did ages ago, before we started doing WANKs, in which we were exploring Hongdae and we actually went to Publique. Well, there you go. Two videos that show you the area Publique is in, and one in which we actually enter Publique. Whoa: that video was way before we had the Eatyourkimchi Studio. So odd!

Anyhow, Publique is a reliable go-to shop for us whenever we need bread. Sure, it’s pricy, but some days we need a good, crusty loaf, and they do it right. You can find it here on Google Maps. It’s close to the studio as well. Yay!

Paul and Paulina

This one is a lot easier to go to when you’re in Hongdae. If you’re at the top of the hill that leads up to the university, and you’re looking at the university, turn left. It’s on the side street that Starbucks is on (and the new Paris Baguette, speaking of which). A few steps down that side street and you’ll see Paul & Paulina. It serves good croissants and nice loaves of bread, though the prices aren’t for the faint of heart. That doesn’t stop it from having huge lines most of the time we go there, though! Still, if you really need some bread, this place is a safe bet for you :D

The Bakers Table

We don’t go to Itaewon often. Most of the time it’s for vet appointments for Meemers, but whenever we do go, we stop by The Bakers Table to pick up bread. They’ve got lots of great loaves there. It’s also a restaurant, and serves some pretty wicked sandwiches, that we sometimes sit for as well, but it seems like every time we go it’s crazy packed, so we just pick up a couple of loaves and go back on our way. You get more bread for your buck here than you do in the first two locations as well. Check em out on Facebook

So, yeah, that’s it for our bread sources. If you’re living in Korea and have some that you go to, PLEASE SHARE! We need to stick together on this! Otherwise, we’d love to know what bread culture is like where you’re from, and if you felt picky about the bread when you visited other places. Anyone else try bakeries in both Korea and Japan and feel the same way? Let us know!

Lastly, I’m sure comments will pop up now like “Oh! Simon and Martina make fun of Korean bread without knowing how to cook in Korean fluently,” which we’ll respond by saying “yeah, we cook Korean food, too, all the time” but then they’ll respond by saying “yeah, but you do so with terrible accents seasoning. You have to be able to cook Korean food perfectly before you can talk about Korea making non-Korean food!” I’m sure :D

Comments

159

Share Post

TL;DR

HIDE COMMENTS

Korean Bakeries and Kpop Cafes

159 COMMENTS

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  1. Adi

    another off-topic here… a dose of Romanian song for you guyz… hope u like it… https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5JlfQCElDc

    6 years ago
  2. talking about ‘robot legs’ ;) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jA8inmHhx8c

    6 years ago
  3. My mom co-owns a Chinese bakery (and before you ask, no she is not the baker. She deals with the financial, hiring, and supplies). We are also known for being one of the best Chinese bakeries in Vancouver for egg tarts. So, I’ll discuss our bakery as well as being a southern Chinese:

    Bread must be soft. SUPER soft and well, fluffy, but not too fluffy. Wonder Bread and that other stuff from the store are to coarse and too dry. Ours are soft and fluffy because the head baker has trained in Japan for baking. There are buns with savoury fillings like egg, ham, cheese, bbq pork, tuna, etc. But we do have some sweet fillings like blueberry cream. Ours are known for NOT getting hard the next day. They will still remain soft and fluffy.

    Occasionally we will head to the giant Hmart, and buy breads from their bakery. We go because we want some sweet thing from them that we know we will never do at the bakery. (I partook in pastry tasting where we sample potential new products. We are out of the sample phase) The Korean bakery in Hmart has some delicious sweets. Especially their cream filled things…

    6 years ago
  4. The UK has pretty good bakeries, but Gregg’s is the biggest franchise I can think of aside from supermarket’s.
    Here in the west of Scotland, we also get Aulds, but I don’t really like their stuff (The pies are so greasy and the strawberry tarts are headache sweet.).
    A friend of mine’s dad is a baker and refuses to make bread any more, because it doesn’t sell. Most people here in the UK seem to be content with just buying a ready sliced, limp loaf from the local corner shop.

    6 years ago
    • I find it saddening that real bakers are losing the touch and passion to bake because society are being so lazy and want everything pre-cut or pre-prep in a box. I want to see more fresh bake goods, but it’s so hard to find a place for that. There are times where I have to travel great distance for a good pastry.

      6 years ago
  5. STEAMPUNk!!!! ♥_♥

    6 years ago
  6. When I was living in Korea, I was in this TINY town which was basically just built up around a university. There was basically nothing there except restaurants, yet there was a Tous les Jours AS WELL as a Paris Baguette… right across the street from one another! I missed bread so much… ㅠㅠㅠㅠ I never got anything from either of those bakeries that really got my attention…

    6 years ago
  7. In Denmark we have this thing called rugbrød (rye bread according to the dictonary haha) (http://www.honningkagehuset.dk/media/wysiwyg/rugbroed1.png) and it’s almost like impossible to find REAL rye bread anywhere except for denmark. It’s probably possible to find it in either Sweden, Norway or Germany, but it’s really still not the same. It doesn’t really have the same texture or taste. There is something special about rye bread :’) Once my friend even told me it was only health fanatics who ate rye bread in the US, but here in Denmark we eat it on a daily basis~

    For bakeries in Denmark we really have some good ones. I think the most well known bakery in Denmark is Lagkagehuset. They have some great stuff, but it’s sooo expensive..
    My local baker is called La Baguette and it’s actually really really great! They have some great pastries :’) and their bread is great too~

    6 years ago
  8. It’s been a long time since I’ve been to Canada so can’t remember what bread is like there but I find American bread to be way too sweet!

    I live in a city in the UK which is filled with franchises and supermarkets but work in a small and very traditional village outside the city.

    The village has a few amazing bakeries, I’ll never get baked goods from a supermarket again!

    6 years ago
  9. Hi there Ghozalie from Morocco. i am a big fan.

    When i was living in Canada, i found the bread too sweet and it has to many ingredient in comparison, with Moroccan bread. So I ended making it at home instead :)

    I wish all the best for you guys and keep on the videos specially the FAPFAP. :)

    Cheers
    Ghozalie

    6 years ago
    • I’m from the US and that’s something I noticed too have noticed about American bread/baked goods when I was in Senegal for 10 months. Actually, now that I think of it, a lot of things in America are extremely sweet. No wonder sugar addiction is such a common thing for us.

      6 years ago
  10. I CAN’T UNSEE SIMON’S BOOGERS FOR THE WHOLE VIDEO Dx
    And simon, what BB cream do you use? I asked in another video but I didn’t get a reply ;_;

    6 years ago
    • Also if someone could help me find a suitable bb cream… the perfect color would be between missha perfect cover #23 and #27… wish there was a #25. 23 is wayyy too pale for me and I like the yellow undertone from 27 a lot more but it is also slightly darker than my skin tone so it looks like i’m tanned lol… Can anyone recommend a yellow undertoned bb cream that isn’t too yellow/tan Thanks!!

      6 years ago
  11. Oh this is so bad, I’ve been living in Paris Baguette, since there is one right next to my university. : X

    6 years ago
  12. Korean bakeries are spreading to Malaysia as well. There’s already 2 Tous Les Jours here.
    .___.

    6 years ago
  13. I’m really suprised to see that you like Japanese bread this much. I’m from Europe, living in Tokyo for almost two years now, and I was really disappointed by the quality of bread here. The pastries are good, I admit, but most of the regular, savoury breads taste like sadness. Fluffy, sticky sadness. But maybe it’s just because it’s so different from the bread I’m used to eating in my country.

    6 years ago
    • See, I think it might be because you came to Tokyo straight from Europe, while we’ve been living in Korea for a while before visiting Tokyo. While you went from perfect bread to ok bread, we went from bad to better. Maybe that’s it?

      6 years ago
  14. everything you said sounds exactly what the state of bread is like in Shanghai… I was surprised to see bakeries everywhere, there are at least three in our street but they’re all chains often with French-ish names like Croissant de France or something, we have Paris Baguette too… but like you said, they’re not really bakeries to me, more like cake shops I guess, I love Paris Baguette’s steamed chestnut cake…
    I did find two bakeries that sell authentic European style bread, a German one and an Austrian one, so now occasionally I buy “real” bread although it’s more expensive, I don’t miss bread everyday but sometimes I do crave it, now if only I could get some proper cheese to eat with my bread… *sigh*

    back home in Germany I remember that there were lots of individually owned bakeries everywhere when I was younger but about ten years ago most of them closed because of bakery chains in supermarkets, it’s a shame because there is definitely less diversity now, everything is kind of the same and you don’t have that one bakery that makes the most amazing pretzels anymore and that other bakery that makes the best rye bread and so on :(

    …now I’m craving Apfeltaschen…

    6 years ago
  15. Bread. Le sigh…

    I left Korea about 10 years ago, but I’ll never forget waking up to slices of white bread with butter “flavour” like Mee or I’m Baker. I invariably got unpleasant heartburn within an hour.

    One day after a long day of teaching, I popped into a bakery for a quick snack to get me home on my hour-long commute. I was looking for anything that didn’t have sausage or cherries in it. I settled on garlic bread. How could you go wrong with garlic bread? Well, I took a bite and felt something gritty on the underside. It was dusted in sugar. Eeewwww…

    I arrived in Seoul having come from downtown Montreal where there are plenty of fine bakeries. I must admit I didn’t find much in Seoul to satisfy my bread cravings. One time I picked up a bag of mussels from the market and headed to Paris Baguette to get some baguette for dipping. The woman who served me started slicing the loaf before putting it in the bag. STOP!! Why are you doing that?

    I have to agree with you on bakeries in Japan. I remember arriving in train stations and immediately picking up on the smell of real butter in the air. It was very welcoming.

    All told, I did grow to like a few offerings in Korean bakeries such as choux crème/cream puffs even though the cream was questionable. I also enjoyed the croquettes for a snack. Whenever I pop over to Vancouver, I try to get some from a Korean bakery. We had one in Victoria for a while, but it didn’t catch on with the locals. Wonder why?

    6 years ago
  16. Jax

    I’m German, so….pretty much all the bread I’ve ever tasted whenever abroad varied between disgusting and barely edible. ;)
    Most of the time the flour is waaay too white, more like what I’d use for pastries, etc and there are absolutely no varieties.
    When I go to a bakery in German I have a gazillion options when it comes to bread, especially when it’s a bakery selling organic food and I miss that whenever I’m visiting another country.

    I never went to a Korean bakery to get bread, because it looked more like sweets, but I was also disappointed with their cakes (Paris Baguette). They look sooo good, but I tasted a few and they were all very dry despite looking like they had a lot of cream and/or chocolate/fruits.

    6 years ago
  17. I’m french and I never thought that I would miss bread and cheese so much until I spent a few months abroad… I guess that being homesick makes you appreciate more what you are used to eat without thinking about it :) but indeed French people often feel that foreign countries can’t make real bread, for example italien bread is not salty enough! I can’t imagine how korean’s french bread tastes like^^

    6 years ago
  18. I remember the first time I went to a korean bakery in my country, I was happy until I saw that they didn’t have any bread… just sweets and cake… if most of korean bakeries are like this… I really feel bad for you!! lol

    I went to Australia for 1 month and I missed bread soooo much!! It’s just wasn’t the same… I had to go to a chinese bakery, it’s the only one that had bread with a similar flavour to chilean bread lol (and it was only 1 month xD)

    6 years ago
  19. There’s a small typo in the first paragraph– “thing” instead of “think”. ;)

    It’s not just Korea… Taiwan, Hong Kong, and China are also crazy about bread! There’s a Taiwanese chain called 85°C, which is now rapidly expanding in California. But, there’s bakeries in Chinatown (SF and Oakland) that have sold bread/buns for decades.

    Anderson Bakery has been around here for a while, and I’m sure most people don’t know it’s actually Japanese owned and Danish inspired.

    6 years ago
  20. I, fortunately, have only ever had positive experiences with bread “culture shock.” I lived in Ireland for two years (I am from, and currently live in Portland, Oregon), and I have to say, I love Irish bread. I’m not just talking about the Irish interpretation of breads we know and love, like sourdough or rye, etc. I am talking about honest to goodness Irish breads, like Brown bread, Soda bread or (I apologize for the funny name, but for realz, this is the real name of it) Spotted Dick, which is like if soda bread and scones had a baby with raisins, dried black currants, sultanas, and sometimes, even cranberries…

    There is a lot that I miss about my time in Ireland, and the bread is a big part of it. I have even taken to ordering my preferred tea brand online because American style tea just can’t cut it anymore! Now if only I could source a supplier for black and white pudding, I would be set!

    6 years ago
    • oh, and Irish style bacon, or “Rashers” as they are called. Can’t stand American style bacon, never have, never will. Too fatty and I don’t like my bacon crisp. I prefer “floppy” bacon that is more meat and not so fatty. Irish, New Zealand, and Australian bacon are all very similar and are a bit like Canadian bacon…Soooooo good! *drools*

      6 years ago
  21. Off topic, but do you happen to know if Hongdae Fest is happening again this year? I’m going to be in Hongdae for all of March and am hoping that it’s being held again this year, I would love to see some of my fave Indie bands live!

    6 years ago
  22. Hi guys, I’m David from San Cristobal, Venezuela. Actually here bread is really, really important so we treasure it a lot. Thanks to many Portuguese-descendents families here, we get to eat fresh baked bread all the time, almost at every corner of the City. It’s so good that we have to eat it at any time with black coffee. Close by is Colombia, so the bread changes a little but doesn’t actually taste bad, they still make it a lot like the ones here so It’s okay. Bye.

    6 years ago
  23. Just saw this video, am new to following your channel.

    And I’m wondering if anyone in the comments spoke about “panaderías”?

    1 year ago
  24. I’m from South Africa and am living in korea at the moment. I am a bread fiend and I miss all things italian, french and portuguese! the flour , the butter! Ahh I’m salivating just talking about it. I grew up cleaning my plate after eating with bread lol (the italian way). Ahhh… bread…. hmmm

    6 years ago
  25. Hey Guys! I’m from Australia, but I was just recently living in Taipei and I found out the hard way how sweet bread is in Asia. Having worked in a bakery in Australia for 2 years I really grew to love the art of baking. SO as you can guess it was such a culture shock to go to a “western” brunch cafe and bite into my sandwich and be overpowered by cake-like bread! It was so sweet! I could taste nothing else but the cake. I thought maybe it was just a one off thing, but the next morning I bought a green onion (spring onion) bun from Family Mart, praying for a savoury breakfast, but of course it was unbelievably sweet. It was like someone has decided to garnish a spongecake with vegetables… not a good mix. I quickly got over my disappointment however, thanks to the abundance of food available walking down the city’s streets. So yes, I share your feelings. P.S, Bread and bakery’s in Australia are pretty fantastic, but I might be a little biased :p

    6 years ago
  26. When i was studying at korea university i loved going to this little bakery called dear bread. Decent savory breads baked fresh though they sell out pretty quickly!

    6 years ago
  27. I don’t know how I would survive in a another country than Finland. Mostly I would miss the rye bread and Im not sure how meny countries have rye bread, other than nordic countries? Finland has really good amazing bakeries, but now that almost every big market has a baking stand the bakeries has started to slowly disappear.

    6 years ago
  28. So~ Simon and Martina you really should go to 사당! I recently was living there and I was right behind 남성 시장 which is really one of the best traditional korean markets in seoul with a high quality of food and friendly people but there I was, super desperate for bread and my korean friend told me about a decent bakery that was in the market called Bread Box. I was decently impressed and if you arrived earlier enough in the day you had many breads (including crusty bread) available to buy. I believe it is not a chain (I hope not>< I have never seen another) and I am confident they make their bread handmade. It satisfied my cravings! It is worth a visit plus the market is awesome and there is also a great little korean bakery stand ran by a woman who is super sweet! Let me know if you want to try it out! I can give you directions^^. (The market is a gem of great places such as restaurants, cafes and the people were very kind to me. And oh man. The fresh tofu was to die for.)

    6 years ago
  29. *Raises hand* I am an expat in Asia, and I miss bread. I’m from the UK and live in Cambodia – it used to be a French colony so you can actually get reasonably authentic baguettes everywhere, but that’s not my bread and that’s all you can get. I still dream about granary bread, or, better, seeded bread. Even sliced bread is pretty rare – you order a BLT and it comes in a huge white baguette and the bacon-to-bread ratio is not good.

    I shared my pain with other European expats and they told me, oh no you can easily get brown bread just go to this convenience store, so I went, and I wept. It was all baguettes, apart from like a $5 packet of four slices of “artisan” “organic” “gluten free” nonsense that went bad a day later. I just want normal bread, why would they taunt me like that?

    But Cambodia gets a lot of Korean tourists and investors so there are a lot of Korean-style bakeries around, and the capital has a few branches of Tous Les Jours that I like to visit whenever I’m in town. I have a sweet tooth so I loved the bakeries when I was in Korea (the Paris Baguette theme music is still stuck in my head), and here at least they offer some variety. Even if it isn’t proper bread.

    6 years ago
  30. 1. Mister Bates. His name is MISTER Bates.
    2. There are two pages (so far) of comments about bread. Who knew bread was such a bountiful topic.
    3. I feel like there should be a series of bread puns happening here.

    6 years ago
  31. As someone who also loves bread (which also goes to my butt :/ ) I gotta agree! I’m from the USA, but honestly I’m not very big on store bought bread (even if it says that it’s made in a bakery there and whatnot). I LOVE homemade, fresh out of the oven, fragrant, savory bread. In my personal opinion, homemade can’t be beat. However, if I was in your situation, I’d still be somewhat picky but not overly. I’d make do with what I could find, just like you guys. But, speaking of bread… A few days ago I made some bread from a wonderful All-purpose- dough recipe (you can use it for bread, pizza crust, etc it’s amazing!). I made a few knotted rolls, and 5 braided loaves. I don’t mean to make you guys feel bad or anything, but they were delicious! I wish I could post pictures on here… When I come to Korea in a couple years (if all goes as planned), I’d be happy to make you guys some real fresh bread :) Btw Simon, nice ponytail, are you planning on growing it out some?

    6 years ago
  32. Hi! I enjoyed your video a lot, haha more than I should. I lived in Korea for some time and experienced that hellish thing they call ‘bread’. Only joking, after some time I found some places that had decent bread and I’ve never appreciated bread more than in that moment. Anyways, besides the bread, I’m from Amsterdam and I just read that you had the best croissants in Amsterdam so I’m very curious to know where you got these! Please let me know if you remember the name or which area it was! Pretty please?

    6 years ago
  33. To be fair: the frozen system isn’t that bad. Nowadays, we can control much, much better the fermentation temperature with special incubator (low and high temperature). So, the yeast work in constant without deviation. It’s a good thing

    The “wow factor”, I guess, is missed because bread is a “simple” formulation. If you follow all the steps, you’ll have bread. And in this case is made for a large audience, so the product is average to please them.

    And I don’t wanna crush your dreams, but today isn’t not very common bread made manually. I mean the baker kneading dough. Everything is made in machines, even the “artisan”. If it’s a small bakery, maybe the portion step is made by hand. But we have machine for that.

    If I knew, I would suggest a bakery in Japan. The top baker in Brazil helped opening a bakery in Japan… he makes all those types bread you like. He is amazing! :D

    p.s.: yes, I though you guise recorded the video last week. hahahah Same outfit! Sorry! hahahahah

    6 years ago
  34. My friend took me to MayBell Bakery in Itaewon, and I was pretty happy with the prices and the loafs. The only problem is they are so popular that they have early morning lines and sometimes (maybe often) sell-out very early!

    6 years ago
  35. So I’m half French, and although I’ve grown up in the US, going to France every summer is a real treat just for the FOOD. The baguettes there, even the cheapest ones (like 89 Euro cents–they’ve had a law there since the 1793 Revolution that sets a limit on how much places can charge on basic food necessities, namely bread) are sooooo much tastier than any American baguette. It’s crazy. Although I grew up on square white bread, my typical morning routine now includes a slice of toasted 12 Ancient Grains bread, which I find much more delicious than white or whole wheat bread. I love the diversity of breads you can find in the US though, from sourdough to pumpernickel to rye… That’s something that I can totally understand missing in bakeries overseas that only sell one type of bread. (Likewise, I totally understand your frustration with misleading bread displays! I’d be mad too! lol)

    6 years ago
  36. I live in the US so fresh made bread and bakeries are not a problem. I actually don’t know many “regular” small locally owned bakeries but it seems more are popping up. Mostly I get fresh made bread from the grocery stores and they do a pretty good job. When I say regular I mean bakeries that sale various types of breads. What I know as regular where I live is Mexican bakeries that sale most Mexican sweet breads, pastries and cakes. They will also bake fresh bolillos and tortillas. Makes me wish I could send on your way so you could try their lovely desserts.

    6 years ago
  37. In downtown Waegwan there is what I believe to be a local bakery called Hans and they out bake PA any day. Their cakes are beautiful and delicious and they have bread that tashes like what I am used to in America. It is a wonderful little shop.

    6 years ago
  38. When I was in Austria I feel in love with a bakery chain called Der Bäcker Ruetz, they have amazing pastries and delicouse fresh bread. But I’m pretty sure it’s only in Austia, which is a shame because they have such yummy baked goods. I also enjoy making fresh bread, this is the recipe I use, http://bakedinthebush.blogspot.co.at/2011/01/bread-and-poetry.html

    6 years ago
  39. I’m from Germany and as other said, we have a pretty amazing bread culture. But we have also a Market with francaise. What is making me sad is, that many supermarkets, at least where i visited, are selling now their own bread which they only warm up, but don’t make themself, but in front of the supermarket is a real bakery. Even if its cheaper i don’t like it and buy myself my read at the bakery. We also have the problem here that traditional bakerys are closing down because of the francaise bakerys. Becuase i’m living in saxony, they are russian bakerys and also some from polen. I was a little stunned how different the bread and also the sweet stuff tasted.

    6 years ago
  40. Last summer I went to the Window Bakery Collection and sampled a bunch of bread, deserts, ice cream and coffee for free! The event showcases small businesses in Seoul. My favorite bakeries from that event were Slow Bread Ever and Bread Lab. Check out the Facebook page for the Window Bakery Collection here: https://www.facebook.com/WindowBakeryCollection. They have events every year to showcase the best bakeries in Seoul!

    6 years ago