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TL;DR – Korean vs North American Beauty Standards

August 19, 2011

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This week’s TL;DR is an epic topic: What is the standard for beauty in Korea and how does it differ from North America, and vice versa? Wow, that’s a doosie of a question…it feels like we should submit this blog for grading once we’re finished with it (if we stay up all night and hand it in on time). Well to begin with, we should mention that these beauty points are what we feel the Korean media emphasizes as beauty, and what our Korean friends might mention in passing conversation, but this does not represent every Korean. It feels like we shouldn’t even have to mention that point, but we’re trying to cut off the “I’M KOREAN AND YOU’RE WRONG” comments from happening. ^^ We can’t cover every point here so we’re going to go with our Top 3.

Pale Complexions vs Tanning

Jersey Shore Tanning

Umm, that's just gross.

It seems to us that Korea has finely tuned the idea of beauty into several traits which are currently trendy, but we have no idea if they were always trendy or if this is a recent thing. The most apparent one is lack of tanning. Anywhere you go in Korea you’ll see people walking around with beautiful parasols, ajumma visors or hats, arm covers, and just about every type of cream comes with a 15+ SPF built into it. The heated debate about why Korean men and woman want to have pale skin falls into two categories. Once being the historical idea: in a nutshell, tanned skin means you are a poor peasant working outdoors and pale skin represents luxury, wealth, and lack of wrinkles. The other argument being that Korean people are trying to look more and more Caucasian, which obviously gets a lot of angry comments from Koreans. We don’t know which side is more correct, but Martina is already Caucasian and she has always hidden from the sun under parasols (even when in Canada) to prevent her skin from instantly burning, so I guess that makes her…a vampire. This seems to really differ from other parts of the world, especially where having a golden tan = going on vacation. The idea of going to a tanning bed is just a horrifying idea to all our Korean friends; even on the beach you can rent pre-set up beach umbrellas to avoid the sun at all costs.

Mono eyelids vs Double eyelids

Gain Mono Eyelid

Gain Doesn't have Double Eyelids, and she's freaking beautiful

Ah, the eyelid. Something that we, as North Americans, have never seemed to notice until we came to Korea. Who knew that tiny piece of skin was SO important to looking beautiful? Having “double eyelids”, or a fold/crease above your eye is a concept majority of North Americans have just taken for granted. In fact, we don’t even have a concrete name for it, but in Korea, it’s 쌍꺼풀 (ssanggeopul). If you’re a celebrity, you probably had surgery done to get it, but there are still some people (like Gain and Rain) that haven’t had it done. If you can’t afford surgery, then you might just go for some Double Eyelid Tape instead. Of course, arguments rage about why this surgery is so popular in Korea, and while many people say it’s to achieve a more Western looking eye, others argue that it’s just for the sake of beauty. We think the real question to be asked here is why having big eyes or a double eyelid is considered to be beautiful? It’s not like Rain is suddenly not good looking because of his monolid, he just looks distinctly Asian and we don’t think that there is anything wrong with that.

The V-Line Face

V Line Face Drink

Putting two bottles by your face, or in your stomach, will not change your face.

The concept of the “v-line” jaw being a coveted beauty trait makes us…uncomfortable. From a North American perspective, you’re either born with a certain jaw shape or you’re not. You’re face is round, oval, heart, triangle, square, rectangular and so on. Really good hairdressers can tell what style will suit you based just on your face shape and you can look at many celebrities (who all have different types of face shapes) for inspiration. In Korea, not so much. We have never seen anybody praised for having a cute, round face or a striking heart shaped face. It’s literally the “v-line” jaw bone or it’s not reported. The reason why this makes us so uncomfortable is because there is plastic surgery readily available if you want to shave down your jaw bone. We see ads on the subway as if it’s totally an everyday event to change your entire jaw structure. The other reason reports on the epic v-line makes us uncomfortable is because majority of those photos taken by celebs are angled in a oh-so-clever fashion to create the illusion of a “v-line”, but in this illusion, tons of products are sold to help “trim” your jaw and face fat. Sorry Korea, we just don’t believe that a plastic face roller can change my face size. With that idea, the vast amount of time I spend sleeping on one side of my face should have horribly distorted my face by now.

In conclusion Professor Internet, it seems to us that growing up in a multi-cultural society (anywhere in the world) has a huge effect on what one thinks is beautiful. We feel like this is the most important thing to remember when comparing beautify standards of Korea to North America. As a Canadian from Toronto, it’s nearly impossible to pinpoint what an “ideal” Canadian looking woman would look like, since we grew up with so many different face shapes, skin tones, hair types, hair colours, body sizes, and eye colours.

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TL;DR – Korean vs North American Beauty Standards

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  1. Since you talked about this in your post, what is your opinion on Suju’s Shindong getting double-eyelid surgery? I’m just curious to know your point of view concerning celebrities :)

    8 years ago
  2. Since you talked about this in your post, what is your opinion on Suju’s Shindong getting double-eyelid surgery? I’m just curious to know your point of view concerning celebrities :)

    8 years ago
  3. Since you talked about this in your post, what is your opinion on Suju’s Shindong getting double-eyelid surgery? I’m just curious to know your point of view concerning celebrities :)

    8 years ago
  4. I have a question. What’s the hardest thing you’ve had to accept living in Korea that you don’t really like?

    8 years ago
  5. Awesome vid lol

    8 years ago
  6. Hi, Thanks for the reply.

    Some of my expressions were quite exaggerated, but the point is you could
    pick whose nose is the most beautiful if I give you several images of
    nose shape. Your friends would not agree on the ‘one’ nose shape, but I
    am sure that significant majority might agree with one nose shape and
    they say it is ‘better than’ the others and the one might be very close
    to the westerner’s traditional nose shape. I cannot say the only ‘one’,
    but I am sure there is one ‘nose’ shape that everybody admires and loves
    (people who grew up with western culture). You bring the example of
    Julia Roberts, but she is not a good example because we like her not
    just because of her physical beauty, but her image that represents beauty.
    As I can remind her easily, many others know her because she is famous
    world star! I would say her image is closer to ‘attractive’ than
    ‘beautiful’ because she have strong character.

    My major arguing point is the value of ‘equality’ is too ‘strong’ in
    the N America especially in US. It is obviously good phenomenon, but
    this social tendency has led people in US (I have never been Canada, so
    actually I cannot say Canada has same tendency, but I think two
    countries are very similar.) to conceal their inner mind; They are tend to
    pretend (Im sorry. I use strong word) that they follow the value of
    equality in every issues and many of them believe they behave with value of equality, but I do not
    think so. People say a dignity as a job of president and plumber is equally respectable, but we frankly cannot agree that value judgement;
    people say with their lips about equality, but they don’t think so in their inner mind.
    It is quite off example, but I want to say that Western culture has
    produced, consumed, spread and sometimes forced ‘the value'(including
    beauty) for a long time; we cannot make a clean slate even if we wish to
    in reality.

    What I do not like is the weird idea of ‘SOME’ N Americans who insist
    ‘we have value on equality, but you Asians don’t. what a mass’. The
    funny thing is the fact that they don’t think and act with the value of equality in reality.

    p.s As a same logic that you bring, the reason why I watch EATYOURKIMCHI
    is the foreigners’ points of view toward Koreans are the view that I
    cannot see about Korean because I am Korean. And I can see something
    that you cannot see because I am not N American.

    One more p.s. Did you know that ? usually when N Americans say ‘no
    offence’, it means ‘I already made offence or I will make a offence, so
    be prepared’.– thats what I feel. No offence.

    Thanks
     

    8 years ago
    • You’re going way the hell out there and explaining political and social views of a mixed continent. There’s no way in hell of pin-point one set standard in North America because you just can’t when there’s white, black, yellow, brown and in between around every corner.

      8 years ago
  7. Seeing these different cultural beauty standards reminds me of how in first world countries being skinny is beautiful, but in other countries like Uganda being fat is considered beautiful.

    8 years ago
  8. There is no one in this world that is ugly, Vani, i think you are beautiful. :)

    8 years ago
  9. I’m a Flipina with tanned skin. Not so dark but not so light either. I used to hate my skin tone (teased about it by friends in the Philippines when I was younger), but I was once in this play (Moved to Dubai) and a Belgian girl was doing my make up. She said that she’d kill to have my skin tone, because when she goes sunbathing, she burns. And when she puts tanning lotion, she turns orange. After that, I started to love my skin. ^_^

    8 years ago
  10. Actually most Asians do prefer fair skin cause we think its beautiful . But we try not to get tanned because we don’t think its healthy cause the sun damages the skin and it causes you to age… etc .

    8 years ago
  11. MSA

    I’ve got to say, where I live tanning is pretty popular and most people my mother’s age will chide at me for being so pale. I do agree that something needs to be done with my skin (XD) it’s not white but sickly pale. Even so, I cannot stand to tan. Last time I went to the beach and got this nice, olive tan – I accepted it at the beginning, but then my face started getting darker and darker and it looked as if I were dirty, not tanned. So I can understand them – some skins just haven’t been made for tanning XD

    8 years ago
  12. People trying to avoid getting a tan is because they do not want to look like a peasant . Unfortunately, Koreans have pale skin and it turns dark very easily if one is exposed to the sun for even a short while. The aristocratic class that existed up to the early 20th century did not have to work in the farm fields and had pale skin unlike the peasants. It is analogous to Americans having not a good image on Caucasian Americans living in the south and have a deep tan. (a.k.a rednecks) 

    8 years ago
    • I’m slightly offended by the redneck remark. Even though i’m surrounded by them, since i’m from louisiana. LOL

      8 years ago
    • I’m slightly offended by the redneck remark. Even though i’m surrounded by them, since i’m from louisiana. LOL

      8 years ago
    • I think Joonho has it right on why Koreans frown on darker skin or getting a tan.

      8 years ago
  13. People trying to avoid getting a tan is because they do not want to look like a peasant . Unfortunately, Koreans have pale skin and it turns dark very easily if one is exposed to the sun for even a short while. The aristocratic class that existed up to the early 20th century did not have to work in the farm fields and had pale skin unlike the peasants. It is analogous to Americans having not a good image on Caucasian Americans living in the south and have a deep tan. (a.k.a rednecks) 

    8 years ago
  14. My wife and I live in South Korea first in Jihaeng-dong Donduchoe-si and now in Seoul and we got quite a kick out of your video.  Koreans take the beautiful thing so seriously sometimes, I mean, in the train car they might look in the hand held mirror at least two dozen times before they reach their next stop.  Several things that you left out is the masculine issues that Koreans have, or lack of.  It is only when Koreans really start to hang around Americans especially soldiers that they notice a masculine inferiority.  They will start hitting the gym real hard because it is only then due they develop this complex.  Tell the truth looking at a men in this country it is hard to distinguish them from the females especially in media.   

    8 years ago
    • I’m not sure exactly what you meant (or if you are just trolling), but are you saying that American men make Korean men feel inferior regarding their masculinity? I’m sure that’s true for some men because there are insecure people all over the world, but I really don’t see Korean men worrying too much about the fact that their idea of what it means to be masculine is sometimes different from our American ideas. And I really like that about them. Although I generally like American standards of masculinity, since that’s what I grew up with, I do not like how rigid it is, and how if you don’t look and act a certain way, you’re “not a man.” That’s oppressive. 

      8 years ago
    • I’m not sure exactly what you meant (or if you are just trolling), but are you saying that American men make Korean men feel inferior regarding their masculinity? I’m sure that’s true for some men because there are insecure people all over the world, but I really don’t see Korean men worrying too much about the fact that their idea of what it means to be masculine is sometimes different from our American ideas. And I really like that about them. Although I generally like American standards of masculinity, since that’s what I grew up with, I do not like how rigid it is, and how if you don’t look and act a certain way, you’re “not a man.” That’s oppressive. 

      8 years ago
    • Hey my friend, Do you want to bring a Macho man or a tough cowboy in this issue? You are far out of the arguing point in this video. Anyway one thing that I really get confused is N America’s value on masculine and famine. You people sometimes proclaim gay people right and sometimes rigorous protect man’s role and woman’s role. The most conservative nation in the world could be N America in this issue, I think. Is this another ‘diversity’? or ‘sexism’? or ‘double standard’? or ‘ignorance’?
      Please be ‘enlightened’.

      8 years ago
      • I don’t think you can really say that the most conservative nation in the world on this issue is the US, considering that we do not, unlike some countries, putting people to death or in prison for being gay, and there more and more gay celebrities that are out and accepted, gay story lines in movies/tv shows, and gay marriage is more and more accepted here.  But you are right that we still have a long ways to go.

        8 years ago
  15. My wife and I live in South Korea first in Jihaeng-dong Donduchoe-si and now in Seoul and we got quite a kick out of your video.  Koreans take the beautiful thing so seriously sometimes, I mean, in the train car they might look in the hand held mirror at least two dozen times before they reach their next stop.  Several things that you left out is the masculine issues that Koreans have, or lack of.  It is only when Koreans really start to hang around Americans especially soldiers that they notice a masculine inferiority.  They will start hitting the gym real hard because it is only then due they develop this complex.  Tell the truth looking at a men in this country it is hard to distinguish them from the females especially in media.   

    8 years ago
  16. Tanning is also unthinkable in Indian culture. I always heard my mom tell me to put a hat on or not to go outside too much bc then I will get darker. It’s interesting. Walk into any Indian store and they have whintening products that help to make ur skin whiter. But I never see this product outside of Inidan stores. They only have tanning products. My friends think being pale is ugly. While in India, the paler u r, the more beautiful you are. Every culture has a set of standards when it comes to beauty.

    8 years ago
  17. Tanning is also unthinkable in Indian culture. I always heard my mom tell me to put a hat on or not to go outside too much bc then I will get darker. It’s interesting. Walk into any Indian store and they have whintening products that help to make ur skin whiter. But I never see this product outside of Inidan stores. They only have tanning products. My friends think being pale is ugly. While in India, the paler u r, the more beautiful you are. Every culture has a set of standards when it comes to beauty.

    8 years ago
  18. hey guys. im new to your videos but they are awesome. are small lips also something that koreans look at? i know other asian cultures do but i wasnt sure if koreans did. also, you might have already touched on this topic or question but i was wondering…me & my friend are both hispanic and we were wondering if you have seen any hispanic-korean couples? 

    8 years ago
  19. Since my internet takes forever to load the video, I just keep replaying Simon’s “BASEBALL BAT” song thing in the beginning. I crack up everytime x’D

    8 years ago
  20. Oh my god! Rain with double eye lid??? That’s just like TOP knowing how to dance: NO WAY!!! ;)

    8 years ago
  21. Guys, I love your videos but I kinda stopped watching them a while ago because of the background music. It’s not bad, don’t get me wrong… there’s just too much of it. It’s too loud and after about half a minute it gives me a headache. :( I wish there was some way to turn it down but still hear you guys talking. I know you can’t make everyone happy but I had to have my moan. :p

    8 years ago
  22. One of my close girlfriends just got a eye widening and double eyelid surgery. I couldn’t understand why she didn’t think she was beautiful because she really was (and still is) gorgeous. She was constantly calling herself ugly and fat (which she was like a size 4 ….is this fat? I think not). When I asked her why she thought she was ugly and she really didn’t have a answer other than she didn’t have what Simon and Martina mentioned in their video. She still is pretty but she just doesn’t have tiny eyes anymore, and now she thinks she is the most beautiful person ever. I kind of resented her at first because I have always tried to build her up and tell her that she is pretty, but then she went and got her eyes done. I was just upset, and she was ashamed to tell me so had to hear about it from other friends like a month after she had it done. After this all happened I realized that no matter what I had said it wasn’t going to change anything because she had grown up in a culture that had constantly told her she wasn’t beautiful enough until she got ____ fixed. I still love her and I want her to see herself the way God sees her, but I just wish she didn’t have to get surgery to feel that she is beautiful.

    I don’t know where I stand on the whole plastic surgery debate, but I definitely don’t like what it is doing to my generation. I have grown up in a Christian home where all I have ever heard and learned is that I am made to look like this for a reason and changing or hating my appearance is hating God’s creation. I will live my life thinking and believing Songs of Solomon 4:7, and I hope that other girls (and boys) out there will too.

    8 years ago
  23. re:” Though I’m not asking for hate comments, I must add… I love the fact that it is not illegal to discriminate, “…ummm, that’s pretty much like saying, “I’m fine with racism, ageism and sexism”. Just pointing out that if you say that outloud, where other people can hear, it’s fair game for you to receive a response.”I don’t want a 50 year old lady serving as my flight attendant like the ones I’ve seen on American Airlines”You might ask yourself why it’s you feel it’s neccessary that your *food server* be sexually attractive to you….because it’s food you’ve paid to be served and nothing else. Suggesting some self-reflection for you.

    8 years ago
    • I guess your right, why is it necessary for my *food server* to be sexually attractive?, though I never mentioned at all that they need to be sexually attractive.  Now the question is, “are flight attendants merely food servers, or are they more?  In my perspective, flight attendants not only serve food, and attend to basic needs of what customers need, but in times of danger, they are the ones who are suppose to take care of the customers.  Though of course, I’ve seen 50 ~ 60 year old Asian ladies ripped, and stronger then many men out there, I’ve never seen those type of ladies serving as attendants.  

      Though the flight attendant comment I made does seem rather ill mannered, may I change my example?  Let’s just say, I’m glad I don’t see obese men and women wearing tiny little uniforms doing the so called (un)sexy dance in front of grand opened stores to attract customers . ㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋ

      8 years ago
  24. ROFLLLLLLLLLLLL….. the cartoons XDD
    Anyways, before i watched this video i realized that I do cover the sides of my face… and I’ve NEVER heard of anyone else doing it (till now). I’m not weird anymore, YAY!! Lol ^^

    8 years ago
  25. I’d also mention the long, high nose thingy (which I thinks looks weird on Asians ex. Park MinYoung, Jeong JunHyeok). Actually thanks to Koreans i got over my long-nose-complex;) Also many young(well, under 40?^^) Koreans hate their natural hair color.Even those who live in Central-Northern Europe(where black hair is really rare and considered beautiful) mostly dye their hair brown(some kids too). Actually I’ve been wondering why brown not blond, red, pink, blue, whatever. Other thing is Korean women shaving their eyebrows and putting some fake eyebrow stickers/drawing them instead. Many Koreans also dislike having imperfect forehead hair line and they keep pulling out these cute, tiny, short hairs. Also here in Europe most of people consider freckles an utterly cute thing that makes your face look young but Koreans really hate it and who can removes it with laser:/ Well I think anyone could list many more jaw-dropping things about Korean beauty standards. The only thing I actually support is light skin color ’cause tanning is unhealthy;) And I drink hectolitres of oksusu tea but my face didn’t go V at all, as square as always;)

    8 years ago
    • Blond was a common color that Koreans dyed back in the mid 90’s.  The problem was when a person dyed their hair blond, people would get the impression that the person is… um…. a delinquent? So as time went on, less and less people died their hair blond.

      8 years ago
  26. Firstly .. what are double eyelids .. I thought double eyelids were a feature of Vulcans (Spock)…
    Secondly .. Ga-In .. droool .. hoowwllll .. droooool … 
    Thirdly .. wow .. a single set of criteria for both men and women? First time I heard of anything like that
    I mean .. when we were in college, the ultimate form of “Manly Men” were Sean Connery and Pierce Brosnin . .

    8 years ago
  27. I’ve always wondered about that! good video!

    8 years ago
  28. what’s the song at 5:00?

    8 years ago
  29. agree! GA IN is GORGEOUS..mono-lids are beautiful in their own way, I think eyes should be considered pretty because of the gaze/stare than the shape or color, the top models with Asian backgrounds neeever have double eyelids and they’re models for a reason right?

    anyway, I heard Jessica Alba was pretty famous in South Korea, why is that if they don’t are very fond of uber tanned people? this confuses me a lot. [no,not really]

    8 years ago
  30. Thanks for the vid, it actually reminded me of the question I always wanted to ask. Since you two are both teachers, do you guys teach your Korean students about accepting other ethnicities or like help break the stereotypes Koreans believe about other ethnicities? Much, love, quinquin.

    8 years ago
    • You should post this question on the TL;DR questions page! I’d like to see Simon and Martina make a video on this. Well done! :D

      8 years ago
  31. I understand the reasoning behind all of this, but it just seems very sad to me. Korean people in general look beautiful the way they are.

    I do understand why North Americans tan. It is because a long time ago a lot of people subscribed to the notion that being pale = sick. So getting some sun and a little color means being healthy and fit. Yes, you do need sun…not for tanning but for vitamin D it helps fight off depression. That’s why so many folks suffer in the winter and need special artifical light to fight off the “Winter Blues”. But like with anything in society, some folks take it to the max and overdo it and end up looking like an ooompa loompa…even with the fake tan. I’m African-American, I do wear sun screen especially when I played soccer in the summer. I wore the highest SPF that I could find because I would blister with heat rash if I didn’t.

    I still feel uncomfortable seeing double eyelid tape and glue being sold and I’ve been here for a year. I understand the reasoning for it, but deep down I still wish they would know how beautiful they are with out it.

    I do feel saddend when I see beautiful Korean girls on the train with the most messed up skin due to over use of makeup. I always think if they were confident in being natural or not using makeup so much they would have healthy skin. Plus some girls use so much make up that when they do take it off they look completely different. We do that in the US too, but I think Korean girls have it down to an art form especially with the overuse of eye makeup.

    I also feel saddend when Korean women with athletic bodies feel ashamed about their build. Even the ones who play in action roles on TV. In most western countries a woman with an athletic build is seen as healthy, strong, and sexy.Those women should not feel bad because they have a little bit of muscle. Yes, I know there are strong male female roles here, but those women should be made to feel bad, but celebrated. They are beautiful and sexy too ! :) 

    EVERYONE IS BEAUTIFUL!! *^-^*

    8 years ago
    • well said, I think everyone is free of having their own beauty standards and they don’t necessarily need to fit in other cultures to be right or wrong (East vs West ideology) but always in a healthy way, both physical and mental.

      8 years ago
  32. With regards to the tanning issue, I think that both cultures are wrong. You should neither go out of your way to be tan nor out of your way to be white. Just live your life and whatever color your skin is is what it will be. (It would be nice to actually have an even tan though… I mean really, soccer tans are the worst. your knee is black and then your calves and thighs are blinding white. -__-) As for the small face, they really compare that? I’ve always though people with small heads looked oddly disproportionate… Huge eyes I agree with though. I like big eyes. But not so big that they look unnatural. I can also see the v-line being ideal, but not so much that you can’t have any other face shape to be considered beautiful. And I really have no idea why you would want to get rid of your beautiful monolid… I absolutely love them and almost wish I had one (but I’m white, blond, and blue/green-eyed so that would look really unnatural… >.<) Oh, Korea, wake up and realize that there is no point in conforming! (And that would be the hipster in me speaking. kekeke…)

    8 years ago
  33. Thank you for censoring the Jersey Shore reference haha.
    I thought all your points were really valid. I guess all cultures probably have the basic “ideal” like skinny chick, big chest, long hair…..six-packed man….. haha but I def. never noticed a lot of the beauty concepts that you brought up until I went to Korea.

    8 years ago
  34. I watched a preview for a documentary about this! Here’s the link: http://vimeo.com/26833191 (The first part is about studying and schooling..just skip a bit to get to the beauty part) It’s really interesting! It’s sad too though, the girls on there are so pretty but they just don’t see it themselves so they want surgery ): I guess it’s the same for girls and women in every country though to an extent. Let me know what you think!

    8 years ago
  35. I’m caucasian, but I still don’t understand the appeal of tanning. I’d rather stay out of the sun, and not get the wrinkles/sun damage/freckles/skin cancer. SPF is awesome! Haha :)

    But on another note, I do think this view of beauty is rather sad. I wish the majority of Korean girls (and guys too I guess) could realize they don’t have to look a certain way to be beautiful…

    8 years ago
  36. Yeah, I think this might be the right answer here.  It also might do with the fact that Korean people supposedly also don’t have a lot of parties in the home: birthday parties, dinner parties, movie nights, etc.  Social events are usually just done outside of the house.

    8 years ago
  37. wow….so many things lol….i’m asian(chinese…) and i’m already tanned…from all that sports and…sports……I’M OBAMA!!!!! lol
    that spudgy thing never gets old…..love spudgy <3 <3 <3

    8 years ago
  38. GaIn! she’s such a beauty! i find her even more sensual n dazzling than that putting 2 bottles by my face is oh so giving me such a v-line shape lady

    8 years ago
  39. I don’t do tanning either (I’m Asian), but it’s because I’m scared of having cancer and also because I easily have those black dots on my face, and that would ruin it. It also makes you look older! For the jaw thing, it is very weird…

    8 years ago
    • Yeah but I used to know a lot of friends that like tanning because 1) It tends to make you look skinnier and 2) It helps blend in any blemishes you have on your skin ;) I think that could be why a lot of Americans like tanning? I haven’t tanned in like 8 years or so though… I finally embraced my pale self :D

      8 years ago
  40. We’re all different, and should all celebrate those differences :)

    8 years ago