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Speaker’s Corner: Misconceptions About Korea

March 23, 2015

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We were really hoping for a lot of conversation from Korean people for this topic, but it seems a lot of foreigners had things to say! If you watch a lot of Korean dramas, you might come to Korea having an idea of what it will be like. I will say that some things like matching couple culture is indeed true, but the ridiculous dramatic overreactions is something that is not true. Also the swaggy apartments you see are rare and for the rich. Even “poor” characters have super nice apartments and the newest phone and fashion. Those kind of misconceptions about coming to Korea reminded me of how my students used to watch High School Musical and ask me if all houses in Canada were as huge as the ones in the movie or if all students were that good looking and stylish. Ha ha ha. Nope. I live in a bungalow in Canada!

The other popular misconception mentioned was about kpop. While kpop is blasted a lot from the speakers outside of stores in Korea, it’s pop music the same as it is in your home country. You might hear Justin Bieber or Ariana Grande (who BTW we thought was a drink at Starbucks) being blasted in the mall in Toronto but that does mean all Canadians listen to this music constantly? No, it’s just pop music which literally just means: popular music. Music that is currently popular but can quickly change. Similarly, there might be a one hit wonder in North America that makes it to the top of the music charts but they’ll eventually fade out once that one song isn’t popular anymore. You might not even know the name of the artist but you might recognize the sound of the song.

The same thing can happen with kpop. A group can debut and release a song that you might hear playing on the street of Korea but it doesn’t mean they’ve made it. They’re just in the new release music circulation and the average Korean person won’t even know their name. Lately, kpop become so over saturated with many groups constantly debuting it became even harder for anyone to recognize the difference in these groups. Since they don’t stream from the radio at stores (they stream from a never ending music playlist) there are no interruptions, the music just washes over you as background noise and you never learn the name of the group. Kpop groups can come and go in Korea so fast with no one knowing they existed. The kpop group’s company will post pictures of events or behind the scene makeup and travel stuff or even post videos from music shows. In turn, the kpop fan group keeps supporting them but truthfully, having a fan club doesn’t mean they’re big in Korea. They might be big amongst the international fans but there are so many kpop groups in Korea that could walk down the street and be totally unrecognized.

People don’t even follow any of the gossip of what’s occurring in the kpop world. So many people didn’t even know that BAP existed let alone had contract problems. They don’t know that Red Velvet is a new SM group. They’ve never even heard of UKISS, Boyfriend, or BTS. If you want an indication of how popular a group might be, see how often they are appearing on mainstream TV in Korea and I don’t mean on music related shows. Are they on many different types of variety shows? Are they making guest appearances alone without their group members? Are they hosting a Korean variety show? Are Korean people making parody videos of their music videos? These are all indications of a group or even a single group member picking up steam in Korea. If a single member picks up steam in Korea it might bring no popularity to the group itself as a musical act but rather boost that one member’s career in acting. I’ve even watched a Korean drama and found out later on that one of the people acting in it is from a kpop group that I’ve never heard of before!

So that’s a lot of talk about kpop misconceptions! So if you’re visited Korea, what are some misconceptions you had? What about your home country…what are things people think are happening that are totally wrong. I can tell you that Canadians don’t walk around drinking maple syrup and wearing hockey skates.

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Speaker’s Corner: Misconceptions About Korea

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  1. im a korean american adoptee and returning to korea was so tough! at first glance i look korean but i dont speak korean and i am very westernized since i grew up in a caucasian family. native koreans would speak to me in korean until they realized i didnt understand them, and then i’d feel ashamed. i always stood out, but to still feel like i didnt belong in korea was hard. returning again in a few weeks with my husband and son to meet my birth mother. crazy. i hope she isnt disappointed that i am as “white washed” as i am. thanks for all the videos, simon and martina! its pretty sweet getting to know a little more about korea from a western perspective!

    5 years ago
  2. OK, let’s make it clear – not everybody in Russia drinks vodka all day long , knows how to play balalaika and dances with bears. There are lots of people who hate drinking alcohol in general and have never seen bears in their entire lives. Not everywhere, but in the place where I live bears wake up in spring and sometimes can disturb people by walking along the roads and coming over the fences near people’s houses. Yes, this happens, but rarely and it’s not normal to us. Russia is a pretty big country so we have a lot of different climates. most of the country is covered in snow for 6 months straight, but we have some warm places too, such as Sochi .

    5 years ago
  3. OK, let’s make it clear – not everybody in Russia drinks vodka all day long, plays balalaika and dances with bears. There are lots of people who hate drinking alcohol in general and have never seen bears in their entire lives. Not everywhere, but in the place where I live bears wake up in spring and sometimes can disturb people by walking along the roads and coming over the fences near people’s houses. Yes, this happens, but rarely and it’s not normal to us. As for the coldness in Russia, we have parts of the land which are pretty warm. Sochi for example. But for therest of the country r

    5 years ago
  4. OMG WHAT A COINCIDENCE!! the visitors from LA were singing a Selena song and today (when Im watching) is the anniversary of her passing… just thought I should throw it out there!!! lol also soooo im like the girl who said that she thought that kdramas were exaggerated.. I have never gone and I still do think/hope they are!.. because…theyre dramas… like im really hoping people arent constantly yelling and the guys aren’t pulling girls by the wrists all the time!!!… in terms of what are misconceptions of where i am from… people always say that New Yorkers are rude… and even a lot of New Yorkers say that so it’s a pretty strong debate lol I just say we are all people but please don’t walk slowly or stop in the middle of the street or subway when there are hundreds of people behind you trying to pass because we have a place to be. I say that’s rude! But even then, people won’t generally curse you out they will just try to get pat/around but if you don’t get the memo fast enough you may end up getting shoved… On another note… while I was born and raised in NYC my parents are Colombian and one really weird, not offensive, but weird, misconception about Latin American/Hispanic people is that we all like spicy food!! I find that so odd. Colombians (sorry if I offend anybody) are some of the pickiest eaters I have ever encountered and no not a lot of spicy food there or in a lot of Latin American countries. To my understanding it is mostly Mexico that eats spicy food but obviously it’s not ALL of their food. Like Mexican and Korean food is seriously spicy for me and when my family came from Colombia to visit not too long ago (and I wanted to show them korean food) they’re like nahh we don’t do spicy. We do have like sauces (called aji- pronounced ah- hee)i guess that can be spicy but that’s just to add on the side if you want if that makes sense!!

    5 years ago
  5. The funniest misconceptions I heard about Canada (or mainly about the Quebec province) were from French people. My best friend was once asked if she had internet (well duh if you can chat via internet xD) or if there were bears in her backyard. I received questions like “what’s it like, living in winter all year round?” Yeah, winter is pretty intense over here, the snow starts falling in November and is only completely melted in April, but we have all 4 seasons too. That same person thought people in Montreal lived underground because of the subway system (there /are/ underground malls and stuff, but people live in regular houses like everywhere else …)
    Another common misconceptions is that people live in teepee. Even the Natives that used to live in teepee now mostly live in regular houses, you know.
    I don’t know if other provinces and territories get these misconceptions too nor if it only comes from French people… (sorry, I’m not saying French people are stupid or anything, (je vous aime les gens _<¨')

    5 years ago
  6. The biggest misconception about Greece is probably that we’re all lazy, don’t work, and steal everyone’s money… /sigh/ That couldn’t be more wrong!

    5 years ago
  7. “You’re not from Denmark, because you’re not blonde. Or tall. Or have blue eyes.”
    …. We do not all look like vikings. And we don’t eat pastries all the time either. But we do love riding bicycles!

    5 years ago
  8. I live on an island, so people think we still live in huts and wear grass skirts. Majority of the time though, people don’t know Guam exists. haha

    5 years ago
    • Did you see the John Oliver rant over U.S. territories not having equal voting rights? It was super, super, epic.

      5 years ago
    • I just learned about how Guam is treated as a US territory

      5 years ago
  9. Coming from Texas, everyone thinks we’re all gun-toting, boot-wearing, horse-riding cowboys, it seems.

    That or they think we’re all of a certain political leaning, which couldn’t be further from the truth!

    5 years ago
  10. Oh the biggest misconception about America, bar none, is that it’s like every other country. It’s not. Putting aside the huge melting pot (which is very true), America is HUGE. Each state is like a different country. Foreigners (especially Europeans) sometimes snicker that Americans don’t travel overseas as much as they do. The problem is, it takes us actually getting on a plane to travel overseas (unless you’re counting Mexico or Canada), whereas in Europe you could just hope onto a train or drive your car. Most Americans haven’t visited all 50 of our states, much less gotten the chance/had the time/money to spend on an overseas trip. Unless you’re rich, an overseas holiday is a huge expense, one of those once-every-two/five years/a lifetime things.

    5 years ago
  11. Huh? Indonesia is where? Is it near Bali? (Bali is a province in Indonesia…)

    5 years ago
  12. As someone living in London, I’d say one misconception I can see Koreans tend to have about British/London guys (judging from some of these videos and others I’ve seen on YouTube) is that they are all “gentlemen”………… looooooooooooooooooooooooool

    5 years ago
  13. Erin, Holly and Tyra! Not only are those names beautiful but you guys look really fun. Kinda want to hang out with you.
    Holy crap do people have a lot of misconception about Paris and France in general. We don’t all dress really well. I guess most of us care about the way we look, even if it’s just a little bit, but we don’t all wear Dior and Chanel. It’s as expensive here as in other countries!
    There’s an idea that Paris is very romantic. Maybe it’s because it’s pretty, or because us French being latin, we’re big on PDA. Making out in the street is no problem. But that’s it. I don’t know.
    Whatever ideas you may have about food, though, they are true. We eat a lot and we eat well. We do carry our baguettes uneer our arm (it’s just easier to carry!)

    5 years ago
  14. I could write an essay about the misconceptions people have about Australia/Australians but I’ll just mention two of the biggest things.

    The first would be the idea that we all live on the coast near beaches and are in danger from sharks and/or crocodiles. This isn’t really the case. I live in an inland town, three hours drive to the nearest bit of ocean. No danger of sharks when you live on top of a mountain!

    I suppose a lot is made of Australia’s wildlife (including the relatively non-lethal creatures) but city-dwelling Australians (which account for the majority of the population) don’t have regular contact with the wildlife, unless you visit a lot of national parks. I guess you do have to squish the odd spider but I’m sure people in other countries have to do that too.

    Oh, and barbeques. I’ve been to about 4 in my life. They’re not my thing.

    5 years ago
  15. Living very near Detroit, I hear a lot that it’s like “the most dangerous place in Michigan” (or even in the US!). It’s not; it has it’s violence like any other major city, but hipster-types run rampant there too :P hehe Flint is the ‘big bad’ in Michigan. Another one is that everyone in Detroit works for the “big 3″… nope; not everyone in Michigan is a car lover either. Some about America in general: we don’t all own guns, we’re not all rich, we’re not all fat, we’re not all supermodels, we’re not all republicans/democrats, we’re not all “insert anything” – just like with every other culture. Basically, if your question starts out with, “Aren’t all…” then you’re automatically wrong! But, still ask! Learning is always good! <3

    5 years ago
    • Being from Flint, it seems only appropriate to place my comment here~ there are many misconceptions of Flint, Michigan– while it is true that crime is high for the population and area; crime does not directly affect all people. For my 21 years, crime has never happened to me; Flint is not a place that crime can easily happen to innocent people. But my hometown is very boring lol we do not have many fun things to do; most things are seasonal, annual, and require some travel. It was so great to see your comment here! I didn’t expect to read a comment of someone so close to home~

      5 years ago
  16. I was visiting friends over in the UK and the funniest misconception I heard about Americans is we all love to play golf :D

    5 years ago
  17. The big misconception about Chicago is that it’s very dangerous. I can’t even tell you how shocked I was when someone from New York City said, “You live in Chicago? It’s really dangerous there isn’t it?”
    Mostly it has that reputation because, well, people keep shooting each other. HOWEVER, the vast majority of violence is gang related. So if you’re in a neighborhood overrun by gangs, then yes, you are in a dangerous area. But if you’re not, then you’re fine.

    Also, people think Chicagoans sit around eating Chicago style deep dish pizza all of the time. Nope. Chicagoans really do eat hot dogs (and will argue about them passionately), but the other real “Chicago” dish is Italian beef.

    5 years ago
    • Yes our hot dogs are sacred. Italian beef and Italian sausage a close second. As for the pizza the real thing about chicago pizza isn’t the deep dish part. It’s the amount of toppings, the quality of the toppings. Hand and thin crust pizza are my favorites.

      I don’t understand how people assume all Americans have guns and all Americans are rich.

      What I really want to know is Korea as corrupt as portrayed on TV? It seems an incredibly unfair place. The oldest or most wealthy is always right. You can’t disobey your boss but then with the ferry, why was the crew blamed for the captains errors. It just seems if you follow rules and bosses you will be wrong, if you don’t follow them you will be wrong. The welder is to blame for that concert collapse where dozens of adults decided to stand on a air vent grate over a parking garage to see better. The city shoudl have built an air vent feet above sidewalk level to support dozens of adults standing or dancing on the thing? Really? There seems to be a lot of blame shifted wrongly on innocent people. Is good honorable work in the west that is considered respectable considered dirty, dangerous and demeaning and not considered respectible?

      5 years ago
      • And the fireman and the fire that destroyed an officetel. Why were the fireman blamed for the fire spreading becuase they used helicopters while they were used saving people off the rooftop? Blame the helpers. Is it the fire departments fault that the engines couldn’t even access on side of the building becuase the location of the building to tracks? And why zero compassion for the youngest ferry victims or the divers who died in the rescue and recovery part of the mission? Is there’s really an attitude of bad things should never happen?

        I like the more plain apartments you see on the news programs or EBS. I love heated floors. I don’t understand why Americans in some parts of the country wear shoes inside and have carpet. It makes no sense. Why don’t the apartments have better sound proofing? Fining people for a baby crying more than a few minutes and bothering the neighbors? There are so many gadgets. Can’t the tech improve sound proofing?

        5 years ago
  18. Such a great Spudgy voice!

    5 years ago
  19. I was born in Haiti and still consider it home. We do not eat cat. To say absolutely no one does, would be a lie, but I can assure you they aren’t house cats. Think jungle cats.

    Also, we do not all do voodoo or believe in it. I personally dislike ruling out things I can’t explain because unless I was there or know the truth, I try my best not to make misconceptions. It may exist, and it may not, but we do have a lot of “folklore” as any country/island does. I know that on TV when they ask you to donate they show pictures of children starving and inhabitable conditions, but that’s every country. We have beautiful beaches and tourist attractions, hotels, and some beautiful houses as well (You don’t have to be filthy rich to build a nice house from the ground up).

    We also almost always have some sort of festival or party depending on the province and time of year. Our women are beautiful, our men are strong, and in general our people are resilient. I hope this little bit of information will help people look more kindly on my country.

    5 years ago
  20. There are two big misconceptions about New Jersey. One is the “jersey accent” which no one talks that way. It is mostly hints of lots of accents from New York, and some New Yorkers don’t have that signature Manhattan accent. It gets even weirder when people find out that there are two New Jersey accents, one sounds more like a New Yorker, and the other sounds more like a Philly accent.

    The next misconception is that New Jersey is ugly. I get lots of people who say they hate New Jersey because it is so confusing and ugly when they drive through it. Well, duh, you are just driving down major highways. We don’t have pretty highways, but we do have beautiful areas. When people exit NYC they see a lot of oil refineries, and when people exit Philadelphia it is just a straight up cluster fudge.

    5 years ago
  21. My bf has gone back to China a few times and according to him, a lot of people in China have the misconception that everyone speaks English and French fluently in Canada. He’s had to tell quite a few people that he doesn’t speak French and that in Vancouver, there are very few people who are bilingual in both and most people speak in whatever language they want.

    5 years ago
  22. I’m from Massachusetts but I don’t speak with what has become the stereotypical Boston accent so I have to explain to people when I travel that I’m not actually from Boston: my hometown is in the central part of the state near our second largest city, Worcester, which is nowhere near our state capital. Although come to think of it those who live in Worcester itself do have a distinct accent of their own: Denis Leary is from Worcester if you want some idea of what it sounds like.

    5 years ago
  23. I go to class with a Korean exchange student. He really likes American pop music, and I listen primarily to old Big Bang and 2ne1. He thinks it’s really funny.

    5 years ago
  24. Ha! I loved this!

    I think there are heaps of misconceptions about America, but I honestly think there’s even misconceptions within America (another state’s idea about a different state.) I live in Alaska, and if I could count how many times I’ve had to tell people that I’m from southcentral Alaska where the weather is more like Seattle and less like the arctic, I’d be rich. No one believed me when I said we practically had no snow this past winter. I also think that people believe that Alaska is behind, like ultra behind on simple modernizations like idk, having a road system. I’ve been asked what I use to get to school/work and even if we have stoplights in my town.

    Anyways, you’re actually right about Ariana Grande. It is a drink at Starbucks. At least, now it is! hahaha http://www.buzzfeed.com/lorynbrantz/this-is-what-happens-when-you-order-an-ariana-gra

    5 years ago
    • I’m from South Dakota, and I can’t count how many times I’ve been asked if I live in a Tipi. Not even jokingly, people are really serious when they ask that. I’ve also been asked if we have cell phones and the internet.

      5 years ago
  25. First of all, “Hi!”.
    So, I’m from Romania and everywhere I go people think we are vampires. We are not. Actually here is not such a big deal about these creatures. The vampire thing is really big in America and american literature, but in Romania, there are not stories about them. Just if you go to the Dracula Castle.

    5 years ago
  26. Wow, if I had teachers who looked like those three girls from Australia, I’d have done much better in school. (Or, er, worse?) When did teachers get so young and cute?

    5 years ago
  27. I do walk around drinking maple syrup! A while back I had an American guest who came visit us while the winter Carnaval, there were people dressed up in fur coats and traditional outfits for a show and he thought it was how we dress every day. “apart for the clothes, you people really look like us”.
    Online, when I say I’m from Canada, people picture me right away with a moose sweater and a knitted cap (even in summer) but in reality, I wear t-shirts all year long and don’t own a knitted cap.

    5 years ago
  28. Woah haha Holly seems to be a die hard EYK nasty!! x’D

    5 years ago
  29. I think one misconception about where I live (America) is that all Americans are tall. To be honest, I had this misconception too before I moved to Chicago for school, because almost everyone in my home town is tall, me included (I’m 175cm/5’8″). (Like, average height for girls is about 172cm/5’7″ or possibly slightly more and guys around my home town tend to be at least 182cm/6′). Then I moved to Chicago, or really travelled pretty much anywhere outside of my hometown and I found that I towered over almost everyone, men and women alike, so I don’t even know if it’s just that my hometown is freakishly tall, or what, but it’s pretty funny that even I had fell into the trap of believing that all Americans are tall. Or am I deluded into believing that people think Americans are tall?

    Oh! Another thing I noticed that people seem to think about Americans is that we are all incredibly bright and cheerful. For example, a couple years ago, I was in London and visintg the Westminster Abbey and I went to ask a tour guide about something and before I had even uttered a word he said to me “You’re American, aren’t you?” I said yes and asked why and he said “Only the Americans smile when they get ready to talk to us around here.” It kinda confused me, because in America, a lot of people tend to be kinda rude or at least indifferent towards service staff.

    5 years ago
  30. I never really understood how people confuse what they see in the media with everyday life. On some level you have to realize that people have full time jobs and live normal lives, right? Just because you never see someone poop in a drama would you think it’s normal for people there not to? And then to look at what the media is like in your own country and to see how exaggerated that is, wouldn’t you draw the same conclusions about the media in other countries? Music misrepresentation I can understand. Fact of the matter is that that’s what you see the most. It’s all of the big-budget titles on Youtube, and generally speaking, the audience for that type of music is the younger generation (who are more active on the internet, go figure).

    What I think a lot of people don’t realize about kpop, and really Asian pop music in general, is that we don’t have an equivalent in the western world. Not that I can think of, at least. Yes, we have pop music, but it sounds completely different. We haven’t had a girl group since what? Pussycat Dolls? Even that wasn’t the same thing. And there’s very little market for that type of music over here. When some of the top-ranking Korean artists come to America to try and get a foothold, they are utterly squashed. I remember seeing Girl’s Generation doing a performance on a talk show over here and the audience was just like…okay…that’s cool, I guess? CL has been trying and it’s kinda cringe-y. It just doesn’t translate. That’s why it has the audience and the (sometimes obsessively) passionate following that it does.

    5 years ago
  31. I was going to say the assumption that all Americans own guns, but then I thought of how many people in my neighborhood definitely own guns (3) and how many probably own guns. (Conclusion: I need to move.) I do live in the south though where that’s considered part of the culture and you might own one for hunting purposes. (But none of the people I know have guns hunt. :\) But even in pockets where Americans are more likely to own guns, you’re very, very, very unlikely to ever actually see one except on a police officer’s belt.

    Still, I don’t own any, so there’s one for sure!

    5 years ago
    • Wow … your neighbors legally own a product that was one of the most important things a whole bunch of people fought and died to give you the right to have AND the country was founded to allow … and you want to run away from them? If they were criminals with illegal guns and robbed a lot of folks in your area, I could understand it … but you are scared of the ones who have them legally?

      I’d bet you’d be surprised (outside of NYC, Chicago, and parts of California) how many of your neighbors are armed, too.

      5 years ago
      • Isla Vista shooting: legally acquired firearms
        Columbine shooting: legally acquired firearms
        Sandy Hook elementary school shooting: legally acquired firearms
        Virginia Tech shooting: legally acquired firearms

        Those are just a few of the major mass shootings in the U.S., ignoring all of the other less publicized violent crime carried out with legally acquired firearms. You’ll forgive me if, as an American, I’m inherently wary of guns, regardless of how they came into a person’s possession. Also, I imagine the Founding Fathers wouldn’t have been quite so casual about the “right to bear arms” if they’d had AK 47 assault rifles.

        5 years ago
    • i think in the south the gun thing is a hold over from a time when most southerners lived on farms. when i was a kid in southern Georgia (i’m 33 now) even if you werent a farm for profit, almost everyone i knew had a sizeable “garden” (people planted and acre or more) and/or farm animals like cows and chickens and pigs, not just to have them but for food. we had a shot gun propped up by the back door, loaded at all times. it was mostly used for putting down sick or injured animals, esp aramdillos that would survive getting hit out on the main road, you want to get those suckers before they crawl under the house and die. rurual areas also had things like gators and cougars to contend with. my dad and his brothers also liked to shoot at targets. we just dont see a problem with them b/c we grew up with it.

      5 years ago
      • I think the gun “problem” in United States is so complicated because of things like this. I don’t own a gun but I also live in New Jersey which is the most densely populated state in the US. I think owning a gun isn’t a good idea in general, in particular if you have a child. BUT, I completely understand that people own guns when they own a store or have a farm. If I live in a state with a low population density where I might have to drive 20 minutes to my neighbor, I probably would own a gun for protection (most like from animals more so than people)

        5 years ago
        • I live in the city in the southwest, and I own a gun, and so does my father (actually he has an old rifle form his military service days). But I wouldn’t have even considered buying one if my neighbors’ homes/cars hadn’t been robbed or broken into over a half dozen times in the last two years. Sometimes it’s just about the neighborhood you live in. I don’t have a problem with guns, but I don’t think everyone should own one unless you need one. I need one, in my neighborhood. I pray I never have to use it, though, but it’s nice to know it’s there should I need it. My gun is also in my safe, so no one’s getting to it unless it’s me. What right is it for someone who lives somewhere else, probably in a richer part of town, to tell me that I may or may not have a gun in my house?

          5 years ago
        • i’m completely baffled by the “kids and guns” thing. i’d be really interested to see a study on what has changed b/c when i was a child we certainly werent the only household with a shot gun at the back door, many many households across the south did that and my mother confirmed that it wasnt until that last 10 or 15 yrs that you started to hear about kids accidentally shooting themselves or others. i, and hundreds of thousands of kids like me, grew up with easy access to loaded shot guns and it simply would never have occured to me to pick it up and play with it.

          5 years ago
  32. Misconceptions caused by television shows reminds me of Heirs because when they were in America Americans were loud (alright I’ll admit we’re loud) and everyone was either a beach bum or abrasive/gangster among some other things but I realized that if you only have seen America TV shows that is what you would expect.

    5 years ago
    • i think people from up north and out west are loud. when is visit places in those parts of the country i always find myself thinking”why are you yellin?!” folks from down south can be loud but in general you arent going to hear people talking twenty feet away from you at walmart, of course no matter where you go there is always the rude jerk with no home training.

      5 years ago
      • Being loud is not location based, it’s just based on what you grew up with. My family is naturally loud, while my boyfriend’s is naturally quiet. He always gives me an annoyed look when I get too excited, which makes me talk louder and faster, cause it hurts his ears as he’s not used to such “noise” >ㅂ< hehe It's not something I or anyone else does on purpose though, it's just how we learned to talk.

        5 years ago
  33. Really cool video! It’s so interesting to see what each country thinks about Korea and their misconceptions. The cat cafe story was really funny :) love these videos!!!

    5 years ago