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What Does South Korea Think of “The Interview”?

January 18, 2015

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Whoa! I really liked this week’s discussion. Some people have asked us what we thought about “The Interview,” and we didn’t get a chance to talk about it on camera, but I’m glad that we can share something in which other people voice their thoughts. Here’s a few of our own:

1) “The Interview” isn’t helping North Korea’s cause. Or is it? I’m not sure, because we haven’t seen it. My main concern with the premise of the movie is that it’s making light of the crazy shit that’s going on with North Korea’s government, and it draws attention away from North Koreans as people. There’s a real humanitarian crisis happening there, and it’s overshadowed by a messed up government. Making fun of that government draws the discussion away from North Korean people, who have a lot more depth to them than their servitude to their dictator. I’m not sure if “The Interview” talks about this, or if it makes it seem like everyone loves their government.

We talked about North Korea a while ago. Check that video out if you haven’t yet. And – update for those of you who saw the video – that video was actually selected as one of the winners for Project For Awesome 2013, and won $50,000 for Liberty in North Korea. LiNK actually sent us pictures of some of the refugees they helped with that money. We can’t share them online because it would put their families at risk, and I’m just rambling now, and I don’t know where I’m going with this. Just…thank you guise for helping out with that last year!

2) Banning something just makes people want it more. By banning something you give it legitimacy, and it makes people want to see it, read it, eat it, do it, whatever. Making something taboo makes it exciting and thrilling. If you want people to not pay attention to something, don’t pay attention to it. I think we see an example of it in one of the girls in this video, because she wants to see it now. Banning something is a great marketing strategy, and I’m pretty sure that “The Interview” made a good deal of money from all the controversy surrounding it. If you forbid your kids from doing something, then they’ll just want to do it more to see what it’s about. Talk with them about it, explain it, have a discussion about it like adults, and you’ll get a much better response than just ignoring it outright. No?

Yeah! That’s it for now. I usually like Seth Rogen movies. I find his awkwardness funny, though some of it is hit and miss. I don’t really think we’ll watch “The Interview,” though. I like it when I see how awkward he is in being an older, unattractive dude and dealing with modern society. I don’t think this movie will really capture that. Or maybe it will. Who knows. I just don’t have the urge to watch it. What do you think? Have you seen the movie? Is it any good?

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What Does South Korea Think of “The Interview”?

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  1. I haven’t seen this movie yet, but I’m sure I will see it at some point in the future. I studied media and film at university and have always had a strong interest in film-making, so I will most likely be viewing this film (at some point) from a film-making perspective.

    The first trailers I saw gave me the impression that it might be some serious attempt at political commentary on NK. Subsequent trailers changed my mind on that, as I realised what kind of film it actually might be.
    However, I have a curiosity as a movie-lover, so I will see it at some point, just not now while this cloud of hype surrounds it.

    The impression I now have is that it’s probably an infantile low-brow humour dig at NK, which is not an intelligent way to raise awareness on NK, but it is a way. The film did get the world’s attention, whether it deserved it or not, and (as has already been pointed out) awareness of the film itself would certainly result in more people doing real research on the subject. So the film has surely achieved something, even if its means of doing so weren’t well thought out.

    We have to remember though, this film is a comedy (whether it’s funny or not) and personally it seems like a lot of fuss over nothing. I mean, come on now!

    Did the world end when Saddam Hussein was lampooned in the South Park movie? Or when the same guys made Team America and NK’s then leader was ridiculed in Thunderbird-esque puppet form? Although both of these films are not live-action, automatically making it harder to take them seriously, I mention them now for two reasons.

    World leaders will always be lampooned in artforms such as film. This is nothing new. Remember Leslie Nielson getting a bit too intimate with the Queen of England in one of the Naked Gun movies (I’ve forgotten which)? I do. I think they took the piss out of Gadaffi in that one as well. Or am I thinking of Hot Shots?

    Films like this have been around for a while now. Let’s not forget the classic Charlie Chaplin film, The Great Dictator. Chaplin made Hitler look like a buffoon in the film which was released during WW2, before the Americans had become involved. Chaplin’s motivation was a political one.

    I’m really not sure if this film has a genuine socio-political agenda or not, but it seems like a wasted opportunity to make a much better film in its place on the subject, and as I say I won’t be rushing out to see it soon, now that I realise it’s not a serious film.

    Having said that, when I first saw Team America (a while after it was released) I was motivated to learn more about NK. I already knew it was troubled, but I knew far less about its plight than I do now.

    So silly films like this can raise awareness for sure, and maybe this film is a Litmus test for more serious films to be made on the subject in the future. Sadly, films of this nature, if done poorly, can make matters worse.

    Personally I think this will blow over, but I will be keeping my eye on what films on this and similar topics are made in the future and how they are handled.

    In the global age where news and information about the rest of the world is instantly accessible from more-or-less anywhere, if you make something even remotely political (even an attempt at satire) you should be careful what you make. It seems almost pointless if all this film has done has upset NK, or anyone for that matter.

    My prediction is that it will go down as a footnote in film-making history, not because of the film itself, but the chaos it created. I think it’s one of those things that will have its 15 minutes on the world stage then be forgotten about soon enough.

    There are far more troublesome things in the world today to be concerned about, and much better ways I’m sure of raising awareness globally about the plight of NK.

    5 years ago
  2. I didn’t know it was banned in other countries, but the reason it was banned here in the US is because apparently North Korea hacked Sony and was messing with and stealing files. THIS IS ME REPEATING MEDIA AND RUMORS. I DON’T KNOW IF THIS IS TRUE OR NOT. DISCLAIM, DISCLAIM. But on a personal note, I get in arguments with my friends over this all the time about my personal opinion. I really think Hollywood goes too far sometimes and making a movie about killing someone in a satirical or comedic way is not okay. Death and justice are hard topics to relate and separate. It’s one thing to make a historical documentary about, say, Hitler and his attempted assassinations. But to jokingly make a movie about a man that is still alive with a lot of power and a lot of powerful countries backing him up? I don’t think it was okay. In my opinion the propaganda it created took away from the fact that North Korea has an unstable government and has people there who are probably not very happy with their situation. And it also created a lot of stress for South Korea (or at least some of my South Korean friends say it has).

    5 years ago
  3. Yeah, the Catholic church has finally (after a couple millennia) learned their lesson on this. I remember when The DaVinci Code came out, they basically said, “We don’t like it, but whatevs.” I was talking to a priest once and someone asked him about that, and he said essentially what you just said, that the Catholic Church learned that by having a fit about something and banning it, they ended up doing more excellent marketing for whatever it was that was being banned than any professional pr company could ever do.

    5 years ago
  4. I can totally see why some people would be completely offended, even though I enjoyed it for what it is… there were times I was thinking,”Really? Was that really necessary??”

    BUT… there was an interview I saw of what some Koreans thought of it and some brought up a good point. Just the fact alone that anyone would have the audacity to address any issues related to North Korea, particularly anything related to Kim Jung Un, in the most non-serious way possible… is in some ways a political statement in its own right. That anyone would make fart jokes and numerous comments that your typically frat boy would love… is pretty ballsy.

    Not only that… they’re reaching an audience that will never, ever watch a documentary on this subject. Maybe some of them will even thin about the serious issues in North Korea a few minutes more than they ever would otherwise.

    Basically, if you’re remotely informed about the world around you… you already know what’s going on over there. If want more info, it is most definitely out there to be had… I just saw a new documentary available on Netflix the other day. Who knows, maybe a frat boy first saw The Interview and is actually watching a serious documentary on North Korea right this moment :p

    5 years ago
  5. Honestly, I didn’t even hear about this movie until the scandal and then all of the sudden EVERYONE and their mom knew about it. Needless to say I had no desire to see it before and I don’t have any desire to see it now. It just doesn’t look like one I would enjoy. My fiance watched it though and said it wasn’t worth the fuss. He seems to think it was all a marketing ploy and he naively fell for it, lol.
    Whether or not the hacks were real or if it was a marketing ploy, it did develop a lot more interest and I think more people saw it than would have if there had been no scandal.I do like the idea of putting just released movies on the internet for a smaller price tag than having to go to the theater though, and I support that concept so hopefully that can take off. Not everyone can afford to go to a theater or can work their schedule around show times but still want to see cool movies as soon as they are released.

    5 years ago
  6. I really enjoyed The Interview, but I think some people felt disappointed after watching it because they expected a lot more from the movie than I did. After the controversy surrounding the movie in the US and the cancellation of its release in major theaters, a lot of people were expecting the movie to be a sort of political satire addressing the issues in North Korea. I think these people were disappointed to discover that it was just another dumb Seth Rogan comedy. However, this led people to overlook some important aspects of The Interview. First of all, although this movie doesn’t delve deeply into the plight of the North Korean people, it does hint at some of the issues facing them. For instance, near the end of the movie Dave Skylark asks Kim Jong Un why he doesn’t feed his people. Now lets remember that this movie is mainstream entertainment. It may not be as accurate and in depth as some obscure documentaries, but it will reach more ears. The Interview lays the foundation for awareness about some of the atrocities taking place in North Korea. I know a few people who had never heard of the country until The Interview. Now that people know about North Korea, they can do more in depth research and expand their knowledge of the country. Lets also remember that during production of The Interview, Sony forced the creators to tone a lot of its material down. If you feel like the movie didn’t properly address the issues facing North Korean citizens, think about the fact that The Interview wouldn’t have been released if it got any more serious on the topic. Secondly, I read a few articles about what North Korean defectors thought of the movie and found some surprising results. Some of them found it offensive while some of them found it quite groundbreaking. Having been raised in North Korea, it’s still shocking for defectors to witness such blatant ridicule of Kim Jong Un. In one of the articles, a defector said that he felt watching this movie would be a big step for North Korean citizens who still revere their leader. It would certainly have some effect on anyone to see how little the outside world thinks of Kim. Now, I know a lot of people felt this movie was offensive in its portrayal of North Koreans. Everyone has different opinions on the matter, but I’d just like to point out that the plot of this movie hinged around the fact that some North Koreans were disillusioned with Kim Jong Un’s regime and wanted him out of power. If that doesn’t show that North Koreans aren’t just sheep blindly following their supreme leader, I don’t know what does. As for banning the The Interview in South Korea, I don’t know how I feel. I’m a big supporter of freedom of speech and freedom of expression, whether the material is offensive or not. However, I also understand that South Korea’s proximity to North Korea means there is a very real danger in releasing The Interview. So on one hand I want people to be able to see the movie (especially since the movie is way too dumb for all this controversy), while on the other hand I understand safety should come first and this movie really isn’t worth risking lives.

    5 years ago
  7. Personally I agree with the girl who talked about how there’s always going to be Political Satire, that this is a normal thing, and that it should be allowed just like every other piece of political satire like comics, fake interviews, articles or movies. Its just a film, I feel like people are making it seem like it such a bigger issue, guys its a movie, ya’ll need to calm down.

    5 years ago
  8. I haven’t seen the movie yet and I am not really sure I am even going to see, but political satire is not a new genre. Looking back on I recall one of the original political satire series, Hogan’s Heroes. Yes, it originally aired 20 years after World War II ended; however, it was still still banned in Germany for many years. Then more recently, North Korea was the main focus in South Park creators, Trey Parker and Matt Stone with Team America: World Police. This is not something new.

    5 years ago
  9. Hi guys!

    I just watched the movie yesterday, by chance. Honestly, I do not think the movie is making fun of North Korean people, it is making fun on North Korean crazy-shit government…actually, I feel that in the middle of all the humor, the movie shows how sad it is for that government to manipulate its people, and well, even the desire for real freedom North Koreans can have.

    Let’s face it, Kim Jong-Un, like his father before him, is a sad-walking-joke, and like the guy in the video said, “taking-him-off” could not be that bad after all. I don’t see the movie as “racist”, as I think is making fun of the North Korean regime, not Korean people…it is not like that sad Avril Lavigne video portraying all japanese as poker-face-robots.

    The movie is just a normal cheap comedy. Simon and Martina, I think you should watch it and maybe do another video on the matter, comments well-supported.

    Love from Venezuela! (and believe me, we know here what is to have CRAZY PEOPLE in the government)

    5 years ago
  10. I’m a very much for free speech, so I think it’s ridiculous to ban any movie. Having said that I think it’s just a comedy that never tried or wanted to explain the situation in N. Korea but at the most new that it would draw some attention to this subject. So I just hope (expect actually) that anyone watching has the brains to understand that this is just a COMEDY movie that cannot serve as a reliable reference point for any information. Just Google N. Korea. and educate yourself. And if you don’t you’re the one that’s going to sound stupid the next time you will be discussing this topic… it’s really that simple.

    5 years ago
  11. You’re absolutely right when you said that banning the movie was an excellent marketing strategy, because damn, did it work. I’m an American teenager and first of all, all my friends and I were going to watch the movie in theater regardless if it was to be banned or not (because, you see, here in America there’s a certain rise of asian hype- anime is suddenly becoming cool (it wasn’t cool before. I don’t really understand), the rise of ‘asian’ sounding music (ex. Kyoto – Yung Lean; Grimes)- whatever), suddenly everyone wants an asian girlfriend blah blah (thanks Childish Gambino), but you see, the fact that it was banned even led my dad, my uncle, and my teachers to watch this film, and suddenly everyone has watched it and if you haven’t watched it by now you’re probably not cool and won’t understand why everyone is making fun of Katy Perry’s ‘Firework’ and telling you that you’re “peanut butter and jealous”.
    Anyways, the film was entirely ignorant and it didn’t seriously depict any of the serious world problems going on in N. Korea, but it did certainly bring a larger attention to North Korea as an evil. You see, the average American teenager literally does not give one crap about any problem outside of the U.S. (and usually inside the U.S. but whatever), and since the media is the largest influence on the youth today, I think that creating movies like The Interview brings will inspire people to do research and be more interested in following the REAL issues concerning countries like North Korea.

    5 years ago
  12. I have absolutely no desire to watch a movie that ridicules North-Koreans as a people. I’ve seen North-Korean refugees share they went to see this movie and some of them praised the fact they were able to actually go see it, which is understandable. But I’d certainly choose to use that freedom to go watch a more interesting / higher quality one, which is pretty much any other movie it seems.

    The only time I can imagine watching this movie is if there’s a screen showing it while I’m queuing for some office desk to open, and I’m the only one in line, and there’s only a couple minutes left to wait.

    5 years ago
    • This comment screams ignorance. You know nothing about the movie, but make wild assumptions about it such as the movie ridiculing North Koreans. Don’t be ignorant.

      5 years ago
    • I honestly can’t be bothered to click my mouse a couple times to go to a website to download it for free and then actually spend time to watch it.

      5 years ago
  13. Having seen the movie here in the US I can say that I support satire but I don’t support this movie. There are too many issues with this movie, with number one being it’s racist towards Koreans. The entire movies humor consisted of racial stereotypes, sexism, and homophobia. There are a couple laughable scenes but it’s overall a comedy that lacks comedy.

    5 years ago
  14. I didnt think the movie was too bad being what it was. It’s not Seth Rogans best movie, but I wouldn’t be opposed to watching it again. I can understand where people are coming from on a negative stand point about it. Yeah its stupid and over exaggerated things, but I don’t think it had anything that was untrue about North Korea. I mean, what else would you expect from a Seth Rogan movie? He never does movies to be ‘tasteful’.

    5 years ago
  15. I honestly have no plans of seeing this movie. Not because of the concept, though that seemed in really poor taste in my opinion. But mostly because I generally dislike American “comedy” films. They just aren’t funny. From the few comedies I’ve seen in recent years they’re usually too sexual or too stupid. For me, watching a comedy is the equivalent of having a root canal done.

    5 years ago
  16. I’ve seen The Interview. In my opinion, it wasn’t as good as the commercials and trailers made it sound. It was still funny, I enjoyed I,t but I didn’t love it. The movie was made to be very stupid and witty in my opinion. It was made to make fun of Kim Jong Un and how he runs North Korea. I could see why it offended North Korea and got banned from movie theaters. In all, it wasn’t that bad of a movie. I might watch it again if someone else wants to watch it with me, but in any other case, I don’t think I’d see it again.

    5 years ago
  17. I have no interest in seeing this movie because of the premise of the movie sounds like sheer stupidity to me. I believe comedy is a great way to shed light and get people thinking and talking about difficult subject matters;however, this movie is socially and polically inaccurate which is a major pet peeve of mine.

    5 years ago
  18. Banned? No, no one banned the film in South Korea. This was the first time I heard this so I checked again, and all sources I can find on the internet say that Sony Pictures Korea decided internally not to distribute the film in South Korea. Their official statement blamed the sensitivity of the political situation, but a number of articles speculated that this was a commercial decision due to the fact that Hollywood films with this style of comedy (reliant on toilet humour) hadn’t done well in South Korea in the past, which is why films like 22 Jump Street didn’t open there either. The James Bond film Die Another Day, which also depicted North Korea and laughably bad Korean dialogue, bombed in the South Korean box office.

    Anyway, it may have been a case of self-censorship at most by Sony Pictures Korea, but certainly not a ban by the local authorities.

    5 years ago
  19. I thought this movie was in poor taste when I first saw the trailers. I had no desire to see it then and even less after the whole hacking thing.

    5 years ago
  20. I’m not a fan of bro comedies, so as I expected, it wasn’t my cup of tea. There was one part though: Eminem has a small role in it and his acting is hilarious.

    Is the movie appropriate given the seriousness of what North Korean people are dealing with? Absolutely not. I can kind of see the mentality of, “Hey, Kim Jong Un sucks and we should make fun of him because he sucks so bad,” but let’s be real, is there a successful movie out that that just makes fun of Hitler the whole time and pointedly omits anything to do with concentration camps, etc.? Nope. It would be seen as wildly offensive to all those connected to the Holocaust.

    Most people in the US don’t know how bad it is in N. Korea and therefore have no clue why The Interview is pretty inappropriate.

    5 years ago
    • I think Inglorious Bastards sort of makes fun of killing nazis and to an extent Hitler as well and completely ignores concentration camps and I would say that was a successful movie.

      5 years ago
      • Ehh, I can see that. I didn’t really take that movie as a “let’s make fun of Hitler” romp though.

        5 years ago
  21. YES. Yes to everything you said. I’m all for movies that poke fun at North Korea’s government, but this, ugh. I haven’t actually watched it yet for all of the same reasons you pointed out, and I don’t want to contribute to the whole buzz and money-making Sony gets.

    I’m glad you also pointed out how banning it makes it more desirable. How do people still not understand this? I’m still in high school and I understand this completely.

    5 years ago
  22. I’ve seen The Interview and all I’m gonna say is that it was quite funny. Also I’m not understanding why Kim Jong Un would get angry at the thought of America making a movie of him, well many other contries have made movies about our leaders and we didn’t do anything, if he watched the movie and I bet he would enjoy it.

    5 years ago
  23. I haven’t seen it and I’m not going to. It makes light of a situation that I don’t think should be. What angers me is that everyone went around banning it. It’s just like what you said, it makes people want to see it more.

    What really drives me crazy as an American is that I first saw the trailer and my thought was, “wow, that looks like an incredibly stupid movie.” And then I thought nothing more about it. I think a lot of people thought that too. But then N. Korea had to make a fuss and now I’m seeing and hearing about people saying that they’re going to watch it to be patriotic!!! N. Korea basically told America, “Hey, make sure that you go watch this movie right now.”

    I firmly believe that if they had done nothing, the only people watching it would be the Seth Rogen fans and a few other people who like that sort of thing. But now I’m seeing people who would NEVER like that kind of movie feeling like they *have* to see it, just to show North Korea that they can’t tell us what to do.

    I’m patriotic, but I’m also not willing to subject myself to a poorly made movie just to somehow “prove” something to the world.

    5 years ago
  24. I saw the movie the day it came out online, just to spite NK for hacking and threatening the US with Military action over a movie. It was for entertainment purposes and then it became a political statement because of the hacking and SK wants to stay out of it. It was one of the most stupid movies I’ve ever seen and wasn’t worth the money I spent on it. It didn’t really bring that much awareness to what is really happening in NK. It made their leader look like a dumb*** ( which is true, but not the way the movie points out) and I understand why NK is so upset over the movie. I can also understand why SK does not want to get into it over one stupid movie. Anything showing NK in this way would have repercussions. Western views on satire are very different then that of the rest of the world.SK the movie really isn’t worth it. It is a movie with two very crude and drugged out actors. This movie is more of a very bad commentary on US culture and not on NK human rights violations.

    5 years ago
  25. I disagree that we should set the expectation of a comedy to also be commentary on the social/political problems of the topic of the comedy. It can make for a great comedy, like the likes of Dr Strangelove, but it shouldn’t be an assumption. People should be informed by news and research, not Seth Rogan. It didn’t advertised itself to be anything more than a Seth Rogan-type of movie (though, anyone who called them “brave” for making the movie don’t understand how little bravery it takes to make a comedy film in the U.S. untouched by the topic of their ire). As far as the movie’s success, Sony lost a lot of money on this project. Releasing it online instead of the theaters will lose an estimated $75 mil (some to be recouped from insurance tho, so more like $30 mil). Studios get roughly 80% of the ticket sales for a movie, each individual ticket (on average about $8 a pop) for the first few weeks, and instead released it online for about $6 with no control for the number of people watching it at once. To debate it as a “good or bad” movie is absolutely valid, but to debate how it failed to address the problems of the regime is to be disappointed in results never intended to be produced.

    5 years ago
    • You’re totally right. It’s a comedy movie, and it’s not responsible for educating people about what’s happening in North Korea. I hope I didn’t seem as if I was suggesting that it had a moral responsibility to do so. I feel more along the lines of disappointment at what I think the result of the video might be, rather than a disappointment in Seth Rogen for not doing what is expected. He lived up to his expectations. It’s just the resulting perceptions that I’m not thrilled about

      5 years ago
  26. i saw the movie, and i didnt like it. i dont even think it was funny to begin with. satire or not, it was a bad movie.

    recently i have been seeing posts and articles of people outside of north korea granted permission to tour pyongyang and were allowed to take pictures freely. somehow it seems like there’s a wave of new people reporting that north korea is doing well and what we have been hearing about the poor citizens, the oppression, the starvation, the concentration camps were all propaganda by the western media. when i see articles like these, it reminds me of “the interview”, the fake grocery store scene. but i have never been to north korea myself and to be honest, i am struggling to believe either side of the story.

    my heart tells me that those defected north koreans risked their lives to escape the country, they cant be lying about the situation in north korea right? but my head tells me to analyse both sides of the story before coming to a conclusion. i’m really torn here to be honest

    5 years ago
  27. I did like the movie and I laughed at it. I wouldn’t say it was my most favorite movie ever but I liked it. It was very cheesy at times though. I thought it was a good way to spread awareness of what is happening in North Korea because a lot of people don’t want to sit down and watch a serious documentary about North Korea but wouldn’t mind watching a comedy. It does talk about how the people are starving and other things I don’t really want to go in more detail and give any spoilers.

    5 years ago
  28. I think it is sad that in this whole dust up concerning this movie that NEVER did I hear the media talk about what REAL life is like for the citizens of North Korea. No one ever talked about the brutality of the regime that had controlled the country for decades of strife and torture.

    I was watching a documentary on how South Koreans view North Koreans…not how they view the Leaders of North Korea but the people of the country. It interviewed three different generations. The elders still look at the people of North Korea as family, and feel a loss and sadness at being separated from them. The middle aged generation view the people of North Korea with pity; they are not family but they need compassion and help. The youngest (15-21) viewed the people of North Korea as their enemies. The majority of the youngest group did not feel any connection nor need to help the people in North Korea. The PD’s then showed each age group the interviews of the other two age groups. One Elder in particualar, when shown the youngests views sobbed…it was heart wrenching.

    There are no easy solutions to dictators, but seeing the people controlled by them as a mass that doesn’t deserve your care and compassion just allowed the injustice to continue.

    Okay, stepping off my sopa box now…I had no idea this video would stir me up so much. There are just times I watch the news and feel so hopeless, that humanity has lost any speck of compassion it may have once had.

    5 years ago
    • Can you tell me the name of that documentary? It seems pretty interesting to me

      5 years ago
  29. I saw it. It wasn’t epically horrible that I’d want to unsee it (unlike…say…Bruno or Anchorman 2) but just meh. Poor quality. Poor excuse for a movie. Give me my money – oh wait we illegally downloaded it – uh, give me my time back?

    Drunken Tiger’s Pay Day was in the movie though. If you have the chance, can you ask them why the heck they agreed to it?

    5 years ago
  30. Seth Rogan is always baked. I didn’t want to see the movie before the controversy and I sure didn’t see it after. I generally don’t see movies whose trailers leave me with the thought – that would be 90 minutes of my life I can never get back.

    5 years ago
  31. I saw the movie as son as it was released. Honestly it is not a good movie and you won’t miss anything special. Right after seeing the movie I thought the hack to Sony was just a marketing strategy and was not real at all. I believe they got a lot of free advertising time and caused people to feel the need to see why the movie was such a scandal.

    Does the movie reflect what’s really happening in N. Korea? I don’t think so. It is all about making fun of Kim Jong Un and the silly things about him like the “fact” that he does not pee or poo.

    I believe that baning the movie in South Korea is correct for many reasons and if people want to see it, they can allways watch it online. However, it is not worth paying for it.

    Probably the only good thing about The Interview is that we can have the chance to talk about the real situation people is suffering.

    I’m glad you made a post about this movie. I was very curious about EYK opinion but after the hate you suffered on twitter, I’m afraid those people might misunderstand you again.

    5 years ago
    • I wouldn’t worry about online hate for mature subjects. People are really reasonable when we discuss serious topics, like in our TLDRs. It’s just the Kpop videos that get people upset.

      5 years ago
  32. I’ve seen the movie. It’s a typical Seth Rogan film. For me, that means it’s not very good.

    On the matter of looking for a serious subject but the situation in Korea. I think that is a good thing to do because mockery disempowers the oppressor.

    5 years ago
  33. Don

    Do you remember Valkyrie? It was the movie about assassinating Hitler. I don’t remember anyone caring about that. The reason it’s controversial isn’t that it’s about killing the guy, it’s because 1) he’s still alive and 2) it’s a comedy.

    5 years ago
    • Same controversy with “The Pope Must Die” and George Bush in “Death of a President”.

      5 years ago
  34. Just the worst movie ever. I’ve seen it and it says very little things about the bad situation in North Korea, they just show that Kim Jong Un is a real manipulator and he fakes things up so the rest of the world can see a good goverment there.
    I can understand why KimJongUn was mad. I’d rather set the world on fire than watch such an horrible movie about myself.

    Well, you guise should watch the movie if you want to get an accurate idea about how bad it is.

    5 years ago
  35. I’ve seen it. The movie isn’t very good. But it does make one valid point: it’s no use to kill the leader of North Korea, because he will be replaced by someone else and the oppression of the people will just continue. North Korean people have been “brainwashed” and indoctrinated by the system in such a way they consider their great leader like a god. Demystifying the status of “the great leader” is the way to go…

    5 years ago
  36. That couple at the end is in for some trouble ^^

    However I think their discussion is quite interesting. Not just in the case of North Korea, but in general. When is a person allowed to kill or be killed? Since a person is “the enemy” is that person suddenly eligible for murder? If you take a look at history, that is how it works right? An enemy is not human, it is just the enemy and therefor killing it is not a crime. War works like that, a soldier can kill without being called a murderer. Personally I think that is just a way of humans to cope with the guilt of kiling/murder.
    So I think people should not be killed, but rather should repay their crimes for the rest of their lives. Now I’m not saying they can work in an office,I’m not the forgiving type, no I’d prefer to have them work in severly uncomfortable, physically/mentally (or both) demanding jobs; Like salt mines.

    Sorry for the random rambling. Now about the movie, I haven’t seen it, not planning on either. Banning it seems pretty stupid since people love to do stuff they’re not allowed to do ^^.

    Cheers

    5 years ago
  37. If you watched this expecting some kind of serious political message then you must not know Seth Rogan…

    5 years ago
    • *If anyone watched this

      5 years ago
      • As someone who majors in politicial science, I already knew there was no political message in it when I saw the trailer months ago.. Actually, most political comedies have no message…

        It’s like Inglorious Bastards. You know you’re not going to learn anything from it.

        5 years ago
  38. My bf has seen the Interview and he says that while it is funny, its a bad film. I havent seen it and honestly, I dont care to.

    I have no idea what Sony was thinking when they decided to say OK to making this movie… but it’s obvious from their hacked emails that they are not a well run compalny…

    5 years ago
    • I think maybe they thought that Seth Rogen is a safe thing to bet on, as his movies do somewhat well, no? And I also think that Seth Rogen was baked when he came up with the idea. The two…did not turn out so well this time.

      5 years ago
      • I haven’t seen a Seth Rogen film (which is strange since I know he’s from the same city I’m from and went to the high school that is a few blocks from my house) so I wouldnt know…

        Strangely, I think he was most likely not baked when he came up with the idea…. I wouldn’t be surprised if Sony preassured him to make changes he didn’t want (similar to how the Amazing Spiderman franchise is being mishandled)

        5 years ago
  39. Banning something just makes people want it more
    this is so true
    people will be more intrigued about that something and will question if that something is good or bad what makes it bad what makes it good why and so many other questions

    5 years ago